grab vs seize what difference

what is difference between grab and seize

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹæb/
  • Rhymes: -æb

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch grabben (to grab) or Middle Low German grabben (to snap), from Proto-Germanic *grab-, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrebʰ- (compare Sanskrit गृह्णाति (gṛhṇā́ti), गृभ्णाति (gṛbhṇā́ti, he seizes), Avestan ????????????????????(garəβ, to seize)). Cognate with Danish grabbe (to grab), Swedish grabba (to grab), Old English ġegræppian (to seize), Middle English grappen (to feel with the hands; grope), Macedonian грабне (grabne, to snatch), Bulgarian грабвам (grabvam, to snatch).

Verb

grab (third-person singular simple present grabs, present participle grabbing, simple past and past participle grabbed)

  1. (transitive) To grip suddenly; to seize; to clutch.
  2. (intransitive) To make a sudden grasping or clutching motion (at something).
  3. To restrain someone; to arrest.
  4. (transitive) To grip the attention of; to enthrall or interest.
    How does that idea grab you?
  5. (informal) To quickly collect or retrieve.
    • 1987 James Grady Just a Shot Away, Bantam, page 117:
      “I’ll just grab my jacket,” said Manh-Hung.
    • 1999 Jillian Dagg, Racing Hearts, Thomas Bouregy & Co., page 105:
      Hardly believing that Rafe actually planned to relax for a while, Kate nodded. “All right. Fine. I’ll just go grab my purse.”
    • 2009 Mike Taylor, A Thousand Sleeps, Tate Publishing, page 216:
      He looked at Albert and Ben, and then back to Nurse Allen. “I’ll just grab my gear and be right back.”
  6. (informal) To consume something quickly.
  7. To take the opportunity of.
Translations

Noun

grab (countable and uncountable, plural grabs)

  1. (countable) A sudden snatch at something.
    • 1931 Harold M. Sherman, “The Baseball Clown,” Boys’ Life, volume 21, No. 4 (April 1931), Boy Scouts of America, page 47:
      The ball popped in and popped out, and when he made a grab for it on the ground he kicked it with his foot.
    • 2003 J Davey, Six Years of Darkness, Trafford Publishing, page 66:
      He made a grab for me and I swung my handbag at him as hard as I could.
  2. (countable) An acquisition by violent or unjust means.
  3. (countable) A mechanical device that grabs or clutches.
    1. A device for withdrawing drills, etc., from artesian and other wells that are drilled, bored, or driven.
  4. (countable, media) A sound bite.
  5. (obsolete) That which is seized.
  6. (uncountable) A simple card game.
Synonyms
  • catch
  • clutch
  • grasp
  • seize
  • snatch
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Arabic and Hindi ghurb?: crow, raven, a kind of Arab ship. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

grab (plural grabs)

  1. A two- or three-masted vessel used on the Malabar coast.
Alternative forms
  • gurab

Anagrams

  • ARGB, brag, garb

Lower Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *grabrъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɡrap]

Noun

grab m

  1. hornbeam (tree of genus Carpinus)

Declension

Further reading

  • Arnošt Muka (1921, 1928), “grab”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German, Russian), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted (in German)Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • grab in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrap/

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *grab(r)ъ, from Proto-Indo-European *grābʰ-

Noun

grab m inan

  1. hornbeam, any tree of genus Carpinus.
Declension
Derived terms
  • (adjective) grabowy
  • (nouns) grabina, grabniak

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

grab f

  1. genitive plural of graba

Verb

grab

  1. second-person singular imperative of grabić

Further reading

  • grab in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • grab in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *grab(r)ъ, from Proto-Indo-European *grābʰ-

Noun

grab m (Cyrillic spelling граб)

  1. hornbeam

Declension



English

Etymology

Earlier seise, from Middle English seisen, sesen, saisen, from Old French seisir (to take possession of; invest (person, court)), from Medieval Latin sacīre (to lay claim to, appropriate) (8th century) in the phrase ad propriam sacire, from Old Low Frankish *sakjan (to sue, bring legal action), from Proto-Germanic *sakjaną, *sakōną (compare Old English sacian (to strive, brawl)), from Proto-Germanic *sakaną (compare Old Saxon sakan (to accuse), Old High German sahhan (to bicker, quarrel, rebuke), Old English sacan (to quarrel, claim by law, accuse). Cognate to sake and Latin sagio (to perceive acutely).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sēz, IPA(key): /siːz/
  • Homophones: seas, sees

Verb

seize (third-person singular simple present seizes, present participle seizing, simple past and past participle seized)

  1. (transitive) To deliberately take hold of; to grab or capture.
    Synonyms: clasp, grasp, grip; see also Thesaurus:grasp
  2. (transitive) To take advantage of (an opportunity or circumstance).
    Synonym: jump on
  3. (transitive) To take possession of (by force, law etc.).
    Synonyms: arrogate, commandeer, confiscate
  4. (transitive) To have a sudden and powerful effect upon.
    • 2010, Antonio Saggio, A Secret van Gogh: His Motif and Motives, →ISBN, 11:
      This sensation of an object becoming alive is a characteristic that, I believe, seizes all viewers of a van Gogh. The Bible goes beyond being a simple still-life object to become a living thing, an expression of strength, an existence that emanates from itself, beyond the painting surface to participate in our very lives.
  5. (transitive, nautical) To bind, lash or make fast, with several turns of small rope, cord, or small line.
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To fasten, fix.
  7. (intransitive) To lay hold in seizure, by hands or claws (+ on or upon).
  8. (intransitive) To have a seizure.
  9. (intransitive) To bind or lock in position immovably; see also seize up.
    • 2012, Martha Holmberg, Modern Sauces: More Than 150 Recipes for Every Cook, Every Day (page 235)
      Chocolate seizes if a small amount of water (or watery liquid such as brandy) finds its way into the chocolate while it is melting. [] If chocolate seizes, it will look grainy and matte rather than glossy and smooth.
  10. (Britain, intransitive) To submit for consideration to a deliberative body.
  11. (law) (with of) To cause (an action or matter) to be or remain before (a certain judge or court).
    This Court will remain seized of this matter.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • seizure

Translations

References

  • seize in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • “seize”, in OED Online ⁠, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, launched 2000.

French

Etymology

From Middle French seze, from Old French seize, seze, from Latin sēdecim.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛz/
  • (Quebec) IPA(key): [saiz]
  • Rhymes: -ɛz

Numeral

seize

  1. sixteen

Derived terms

  • seizième

Related terms

  • six
  • dix

Further reading

  • “seize” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Norman

Etymology

From Old French seize, from Latin sēdecim.

Pronunciation

Numeral

seize

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) sixteen

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