grab vs snaffle what difference

what is difference between grab and snaffle

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹæb/
  • Rhymes: -æb

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch grabben (to grab) or Middle Low German grabben (to snap), from Proto-Germanic *grab-, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrebʰ- (compare Sanskrit गृह्णाति (gṛhṇā́ti), गृभ्णाति (gṛbhṇā́ti, he seizes), Avestan ????????????????????(garəβ, to seize)). Cognate with Danish grabbe (to grab), Swedish grabba (to grab), Old English ġegræppian (to seize), Middle English grappen (to feel with the hands; grope), Macedonian грабне (grabne, to snatch), Bulgarian грабвам (grabvam, to snatch).

Verb

grab (third-person singular simple present grabs, present participle grabbing, simple past and past participle grabbed)

  1. (transitive) To grip suddenly; to seize; to clutch.
  2. (intransitive) To make a sudden grasping or clutching motion (at something).
  3. To restrain someone; to arrest.
  4. (transitive) To grip the attention of; to enthrall or interest.
    How does that idea grab you?
  5. (informal) To quickly collect or retrieve.
    • 1987 James Grady Just a Shot Away, Bantam, page 117:
      “I’ll just grab my jacket,” said Manh-Hung.
    • 1999 Jillian Dagg, Racing Hearts, Thomas Bouregy & Co., page 105:
      Hardly believing that Rafe actually planned to relax for a while, Kate nodded. “All right. Fine. I’ll just go grab my purse.”
    • 2009 Mike Taylor, A Thousand Sleeps, Tate Publishing, page 216:
      He looked at Albert and Ben, and then back to Nurse Allen. “I’ll just grab my gear and be right back.”
  6. (informal) To consume something quickly.
  7. To take the opportunity of.
Translations

Noun

grab (countable and uncountable, plural grabs)

  1. (countable) A sudden snatch at something.
    • 1931 Harold M. Sherman, “The Baseball Clown,” Boys’ Life, volume 21, No. 4 (April 1931), Boy Scouts of America, page 47:
      The ball popped in and popped out, and when he made a grab for it on the ground he kicked it with his foot.
    • 2003 J Davey, Six Years of Darkness, Trafford Publishing, page 66:
      He made a grab for me and I swung my handbag at him as hard as I could.
  2. (countable) An acquisition by violent or unjust means.
  3. (countable) A mechanical device that grabs or clutches.
    1. A device for withdrawing drills, etc., from artesian and other wells that are drilled, bored, or driven.
  4. (countable, media) A sound bite.
  5. (obsolete) That which is seized.
  6. (uncountable) A simple card game.
Synonyms
  • catch
  • clutch
  • grasp
  • seize
  • snatch
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Arabic and Hindi ghurb?: crow, raven, a kind of Arab ship. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

grab (plural grabs)

  1. A two- or three-masted vessel used on the Malabar coast.
Alternative forms
  • gurab

Anagrams

  • ARGB, brag, garb

Lower Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *grabrъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɡrap]

Noun

grab m

  1. hornbeam (tree of genus Carpinus)

Declension

Further reading

  • Arnošt Muka (1921, 1928), “grab”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German, Russian), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted (in German)Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • grab in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrap/

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *grab(r)ъ, from Proto-Indo-European *grābʰ-

Noun

grab m inan

  1. hornbeam, any tree of genus Carpinus.
Declension
Derived terms
  • (adjective) grabowy
  • (nouns) grabina, grabniak

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

grab f

  1. genitive plural of graba

Verb

grab

  1. second-person singular imperative of grabić

Further reading

  • grab in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • grab in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *grab(r)ъ, from Proto-Indo-European *grābʰ-

Noun

grab m (Cyrillic spelling граб)

  1. hornbeam

Declension



English

Etymology

Apparently from Dutch snavel, from Middle Dutch snavel, snabel (snout), diminutive of Middle Dutch snabbe, snebbe (bird’s bill, neb). Akin to Old Frisian snavel (mouth), Middle Low German snabbe (neb, beak), Old English nebb (beak, bill, nose, face). More at neb.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsnæfəl/
    Rhymes: -æfəl

Noun

snaffle (plural snaffles)

  1. A broad-mouthed, loose-ringed bit (metal in a horse’s mouth). It brings pressure to bear on the tongue and bars and corners of the mouth. Often used as a training bit.
    • 1877, Anna Sewell, Black Beauty
      Captain went out in the cab all the morning. Harry came in after school to feed me and give me water. In the afternoon I was put into the cab. Jerry took as much pains to see if the collar and bridle fitted comfortably as if he had been John Manly over again. When the crupper was let out a hole or two it all fitted well. There was no check-rein, no curb, nothing but a plain ring snaffle. What a blessing that was!
  2. (figuratively) Decorative wear that looks like a snaffle.

Synonyms

  • bradoon

Verb

snaffle (third-person singular simple present snaffles, present participle snaffling, simple past and past participle snaffled)

  1. (transitive) To put a snaffle on, or control with a snaffle.
  2. (transitive) To clutch by the bridle.
  3. (transitive, informal) To grab or seize; to snap up.
  4. (transitive, informal) To purloin, or obtain by devious means.

Derived terms

  • foresnaffle
  • snaffle up

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