grain vs texture what difference

what is difference between grain and texture

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹeɪn/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn

Etymology 1

From Middle English greyn, grayn, grein, from Old French grain, grein, from Latin grānum (seed), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵr̥h₂nóm (grain). Compare English corn. Doublet of gram.

Noun

grain (countable and uncountable, plural grains)

  1. (uncountable) The harvested seeds of various grass food crops eg: wheat, corn, barley.
  2. (uncountable) Similar seeds from any food crop, e.g., buckwheat, amaranth, quinoa.
  3. (countable) A single seed of grass food crops.
  4. (countable, uncountable) The crops from which grain is harvested.
  5. (uncountable) A linear texture of a material or surface.
  6. (countable) A single particle of a substance.
  7. (countable) A very small unit of weight, in England equal to 1480 of an ounce troy, 0.0648 grams or, to be more exact, 64.79891 milligrams (0.002285714 avoirdupois ounce). A carat grain or pearl grain is 14 carat or 50 milligrams. The old French grain was 19216 livre or 53.11 milligrams, and in the mesures usuelles permitted from 1812 to 1839, with the livre redefined as 500 grams, it was 54.25 milligrams.
  8. (countable) A former unit of gold purity, also known as carat grain, equal to 14 “carat” (karat).
  9. (materials) A region within a material having a single crystal structure or direction.
  10. A reddish dye made from the coccus insect, or kermes; hence, a red color of any tint or hue, as crimson, scarlet, etc.; sometimes used by the poets as equivalent to Tyrian purple.
    • a. 1825, Quoted by Coleridge, preface to Aids to Reflection:
      [] doing as the dyers do, who, having first dipped their silks in colours of less value, then give them the last tincture of crimson in grain.
  11. The hair side of a piece of leather, or the marking on that side.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  12. (in the plural) The remains of grain, etc., after brewing or distillation; hence, any residuum. Also called draff.
  13. (botany) A rounded prominence on the back of a sepal, as in the common dock.
  14. Temper; natural disposition; inclination.
    • brothers [] not united in grain
  15. (photography, videography) Visual texture in processed photographic film due to the presence of small particles of a metallic silver, or dye clouds, developed from silver halide that have received enough photons.
Derived terms
  • against the grain
  • grain of salt
  • grainy
Related terms
Translations
See also
  • cereal
  • Appendix:Grains – translation tables for various grains

Verb

grain (third-person singular simple present grains, present participle graining, simple past and past participle grained)

  1. To feed grain to.
  2. (transitive) To make granular; to form into grains.
  3. (intransitive) To form grains, or to assume a granular form, as the result of crystallization; to granulate.
  4. To texture a surface in imitation of the grain of a substance such as wood.
  5. (tanning) To remove the hair or fat from a skin.
  6. (tanning) To soften leather.
  7. To yield fruit.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Gower to this entry?)
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English grayn, from Old Norse grein.

Noun

grain (plural grains)

  1. A branch of a tree; a stalk or stem of a plant.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of G. Douglas to this entry?)
  2. A tine, prong, or fork.
    1. One of the branches of a valley or river.
    2. An iron fish spear or harpoon, with a number of points half-barbed inwardly.
      • 4 May 1770, Stephen Forwood (gunner on H.M. Bark Endeavour), journal (quoted by Parkin (page 195)
        Served 5 lb of fish per man which was caught by striking with grains
    3. A blade of a sword, knife, etc.
  3. (founding) A thin piece of metal, used in a mould to steady a core.

Further reading

  • grain in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • grain in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • A ring, IgNAR, Ngari, Nigra, Ragin, Rigan, agrin, nigra, raign, raing

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʁɛ̃/
  • Rhymes: -ɛ̃

Etymology 1

From Middle French, from Old French grain, grein, from Latin grānum, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ǵr̥h₂nóm.

Noun

grain m (plural grains)

  1. grain
  2. (figuratively) a small amount, a bit
Derived terms
  • avoir un grain
  • grain de beauté
  • gros-grain
  • mettre son grain de sel
  • ramener son grain de sel
  • séparer le bon grain de l’ivraie
  • veiller au grain

Related terms

  • grenier

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

grain m (plural grains)

  1. (nautical) squall, thunderstorm

Derived terms

Anagrams

  • garni

Further reading

  • “grain” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle English

Verb

grain

  1. Alternative form of greynen

Old French

Alternative forms

  • grein

Etymology

From Latin grānum.

Noun

grain m (oblique plural grainz, nominative singular grainz, nominative plural grain)

  1. grain (edible part of a cereal plant)

Related terms

  • grenier / guernier

Descendants

  • Middle French: grain
    • French: grain
  • Middle English: greyn, grayn, greyne, grayne, grein, grone
    • English: grain
    • Scots: grain
    • Yola: gryne


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French texture, borrowed from Latin textūra (a weaving, web, texture, structure), from textus, past participle of texere (to weave). See text. Doublet of tessitura.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈtɛkstʃə(ɹ)/, /ˈtɛkʃtʃə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -ɛkstʃə(ɹ)

Noun

texture (countable and uncountable, plural textures)

  1. The feel or shape of a surface or substance; the smoothness, roughness, softness, etc. of something.
  2. (art) The quality given to a work of art by the composition and interaction of its parts.
  3. (computer graphics) An image applied to a polygon to create the appearance of a surface.
    • 2004, Will Smith, Maximum PC Guide to Building a Dream PC (page 97)
      The videocard is responsible for drawing every polygon, texture, and particle effect in every game you play.
  4. (obsolete) The act or art of weaving.
  5. (obsolete) Something woven; a woven fabric; a web.
    • 1730, James Thomson, Spring
      Others, apart far in the grassy dale, / Or roughening waste, their humble texture weave.
  6. (biology, obsolete) A tissue.

Related terms

Translations

Verb

texture (third-person singular simple present textures, present participle texturing, simple past and past participle textured)

  1. To create or apply a texture.
    Drag the trowel through the plaster to texture the wall.

Further reading

  • texture in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • texture in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Etymology

From Middle French texture, borrowed from Latin textūra (a weaving, web, texture, structure), from textus, past participle of texere (to weave). See text.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɛk.styʁ/

Noun

texture f (plural textures)

  1. texture

Related terms

  • texte

Further reading

  • “texture” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Participle

textūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of textūrus

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