grand vs lordly what difference

what is difference between grand and lordly

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹænd/
  • Rhymes: -ænd

Etymology 1

From Middle English grand, grond, graund, graunt, from Anglo-Norman graunt, from Old French grant, from Latin grandis. Doublet of grande and grandee.

Alternative forms

  • grande

Adjective

grand (comparative grander or more grand, superlative grandest or most grand)

  1. Of a large size or extent; great.
    a grand mountain
    a grand army
    a grand mistake
  2. Great in size, and fine or imposing in appearance or impression; illustrious, dignified, magnificent.
    a grand monarch
    a grand view
    His simple vision has transformed into something far more grand.
  3. Having higher rank or more dignity, size, or importance than other persons or things of the same name.
    a grand lodge
    a grand vizier
    a grand piano
    The Grand Viziers of the Ottoman Empire.
  4. (usually in compound forms) Standing in the second or some more remote degree of parentage or descent (see grand-).
    grandfather, grandson, grand-child
  5. (Ireland, Northern England, colloquial, otherwise dated) Fine; lovely.
  6. (music) Containing all the parts proper to a given form of composition.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

grand (plural grands or grand)

  1. (plural “grand”) A thousand of some unit of currency, such as dollars or pounds. (Compare G.)
    For quotations using this term, see Citations:grand.
  2. (music, plural “grands”) A grand piano
Translations

Etymology 2

From granddaughter, grandfather, grandmother, grandson, etc.

Noun

grand (plural grands)

  1. A grandparent or grandchild.
    • 1987, Toni Morrison, Beloved, page 269:
      Once, in Maryland, he met four families of slaves who had all been together for a hundred years: great-grands, grands, mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, cousins, children.
    • 2012, Brenda Jackson, Texas Wild & Beyond Temptation, page 47:
      Her granddaughter and great-granddaughter went with us as chaperones. Did I ever tell you that she had six grands and two great-grands? [] And Emily agrees with me it’s a shame that I don’t even have a grand.

Further reading

  • grand in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • DRAGN

Bourguignon

Etymology

From Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand (feminine grand or grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grands or grandes)

  1. big

French

Etymology

From Middle French grand, from Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʁɑ̃/, (followed by vowel or h muet) /ɡʁɑ̃.t‿/

Adjective

grand (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes)

  1. big, great, grand
  2. tall
  3. (usually capitalized) Great, an honorific title
  4. great; big fat; an intensifier
  5. extensive, large

Derived terms

See also

  • grand-mère
  • grand-père
  • grand-chose

Further reading

  • “grand” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian

Alternative forms

  • grant (standard orthography)

Adjective

grand

  1. Alternative form of grant

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse grand (injury, hurt).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /krant/
  • Rhymes: -ant

Noun

grand n (genitive singular grands, nominative plural grönd)

  1. damage, harm, destruction
  2. (card games) absence of trump cards/suits

Declension

Synonyms

  • mein
  • skaði
  • óskundi

Related terms

  • granda

Lombard

Etymology

Akin to Italian grande, from Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand

  1. big, large

Middle French

Alternative forms

  • grant

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes) (comparative greigneur, superlative greigneur)

  1. big; large

Descendants

  • French: grand

Norman

Alternative forms

  • grànd (Guernsey)

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrɑ̃/, /ɡrɔ̃/
  • (Jersey)

Adjective

grand m

  1. (Jersey) big

Derived terms


Occitan

Etymology

From Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular granda, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandas)

  1. big, large
    Antonyms: pichon, petit

Derived terms

  • grandament
  • grandàs
  • grandesa

Further reading

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 538.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrant/

Etymology 1

From Spanish grande.

Noun

grand m pers

  1. grandee (high-ranking Spanish nobleman)
Declension

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

grand

  1. genitive plural of granda

Further reading

  • grand in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • grand in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) grond
  • (Sutsilvan) grànd

Etymology

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular granda, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandas)

  1. (Puter) big, large
  2. (Puter) tall

Swedish

Noun

grand n

  1. a mote, a speck, something very small and unimportant

Usage notes

  • The form grann is used in the adverb litegrann (a bit), which in older texts can be written litet grand.
  • Phrases like vi åt lunch på Grand, refer to a “Grand Hotel” available in several towns

Declension


Walloon

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes, feminine plural (before noun) grandès)

  1. large, big


English

Alternative forms

  • Lordly

Etymology

From Middle English louerdlich, lordlyche, lordeliche, from Old English hlāfordlīċ (lordly; heroic; noble), equivalent to lord +‎ -ly.

The adverb is from Middle English lordly, lordely, lordliche.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɔː(ɹ)dli/

Adjective

lordly (comparative lordlier or more lordly, superlative lordliest or most lordly)

  1. Of or relating to a lord.
    Show us your lordly might: demonstrate that you can order people and get them to obey.
    • 1880, John Nichols, The Gentleman’s Magazine – Volume 248 – Page 60:
      But they are the peers of the Queensland Parliament, and, having no lordly robes, must approach the Old Country model as closely as possible.
    • 2006, Steve Wharton, Screening Reality – Page 104:
      […] in that some form of duty and sacrifice (here, participation in the 1848 Revolution and a recognition of his lordly duty) is not only beneficially character- forming but also leads ultimately to a condition which is ‘sublime’.
    • 2011, Thomas Smith, C. Matthew McMahon, Therese B. McMahon, Select Memoirs of the English and Scottish Divines: – Page 282:
      Samson, in reply to this, says, “If you are not lordly, nor value your lordly title, as you tell me, and I trust in truth and sincerity, shall I call you a phoenix?
    • 2011, Mary Jane Staples, Appointment At The Palace: An Adams Family Saga Novel – Page 275:
      […] he’s still got his lordly habits, and more so since coming out of the war as a general.’ ‘A colonel, Sammy,’ said Rachel. ‘Same thing, good as,’ said Sammy. ‘Boots, of course, does wear his lordly crown with style,’ said Rachel. ‘Don’t I know it?
  2. Having the qualities of a lord; lordlike; noble
  3. Appropriate for, or suitable to, a lord; glorious.
    • 1849, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, In Memorium A. H. H.
      The maidens gathered strength and grace / And presence, lordlier than before.
  4. Proud; haughty; imperious; insolent.

Derived terms

  • lordliness

Translations

Adverb

lordly (comparative lordlier, superlative lordliest)

  1. In the manner of a lord. Showing command or nobility.
    • 1891, Sir Edwin Arnold, The Light of the World: Or, The Great Consummation,[1] Book I — “Mary Magdalene”, Funk & Wagnalls, page 56,
      [] / And Herod’s painted pinnaces, ablaze / With lamps, and brazen shields and spangled slaves, / Came and went lordly at Tiberias; / []

Anagrams

  • drolly

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial