grand vs sublime what difference

what is difference between grand and sublime

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹænd/
  • Rhymes: -ænd

Etymology 1

From Middle English grand, grond, graund, graunt, from Anglo-Norman graunt, from Old French grant, from Latin grandis. Doublet of grande and grandee.

Alternative forms

  • grande

Adjective

grand (comparative grander or more grand, superlative grandest or most grand)

  1. Of a large size or extent; great.
    a grand mountain
    a grand army
    a grand mistake
  2. Great in size, and fine or imposing in appearance or impression; illustrious, dignified, magnificent.
    a grand monarch
    a grand view
    His simple vision has transformed into something far more grand.
  3. Having higher rank or more dignity, size, or importance than other persons or things of the same name.
    a grand lodge
    a grand vizier
    a grand piano
    The Grand Viziers of the Ottoman Empire.
  4. (usually in compound forms) Standing in the second or some more remote degree of parentage or descent (see grand-).
    grandfather, grandson, grand-child
  5. (Ireland, Northern England, colloquial, otherwise dated) Fine; lovely.
  6. (music) Containing all the parts proper to a given form of composition.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

grand (plural grands or grand)

  1. (plural “grand”) A thousand of some unit of currency, such as dollars or pounds. (Compare G.)
    For quotations using this term, see Citations:grand.
  2. (music, plural “grands”) A grand piano
Translations

Etymology 2

From granddaughter, grandfather, grandmother, grandson, etc.

Noun

grand (plural grands)

  1. A grandparent or grandchild.
    • 1987, Toni Morrison, Beloved, page 269:
      Once, in Maryland, he met four families of slaves who had all been together for a hundred years: great-grands, grands, mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, cousins, children.
    • 2012, Brenda Jackson, Texas Wild & Beyond Temptation, page 47:
      Her granddaughter and great-granddaughter went with us as chaperones. Did I ever tell you that she had six grands and two great-grands? [] And Emily agrees with me it’s a shame that I don’t even have a grand.

Further reading

  • grand in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • DRAGN

Bourguignon

Etymology

From Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand (feminine grand or grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grands or grandes)

  1. big

French

Etymology

From Middle French grand, from Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʁɑ̃/, (followed by vowel or h muet) /ɡʁɑ̃.t‿/

Adjective

grand (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes)

  1. big, great, grand
  2. tall
  3. (usually capitalized) Great, an honorific title
  4. great; big fat; an intensifier
  5. extensive, large

Derived terms

See also

  • grand-mère
  • grand-père
  • grand-chose

Further reading

  • “grand” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian

Alternative forms

  • grant (standard orthography)

Adjective

grand

  1. Alternative form of grant

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse grand (injury, hurt).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /krant/
  • Rhymes: -ant

Noun

grand n (genitive singular grands, nominative plural grönd)

  1. damage, harm, destruction
  2. (card games) absence of trump cards/suits

Declension

Synonyms

  • mein
  • skaði
  • óskundi

Related terms

  • granda

Lombard

Etymology

Akin to Italian grande, from Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand

  1. big, large

Middle French

Alternative forms

  • grant

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes) (comparative greigneur, superlative greigneur)

  1. big; large

Descendants

  • French: grand

Norman

Alternative forms

  • grànd (Guernsey)

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrɑ̃/, /ɡrɔ̃/
  • (Jersey)

Adjective

grand m

  1. (Jersey) big

Derived terms


Occitan

Etymology

From Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular granda, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandas)

  1. big, large
    Antonyms: pichon, petit

Derived terms

  • grandament
  • grandàs
  • grandesa

Further reading

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 538.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrant/

Etymology 1

From Spanish grande.

Noun

grand m pers

  1. grandee (high-ranking Spanish nobleman)
Declension

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

grand

  1. genitive plural of granda

Further reading

  • grand in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • grand in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) grond
  • (Sutsilvan) grànd

Etymology

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular granda, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandas)

  1. (Puter) big, large
  2. (Puter) tall

Swedish

Noun

grand n

  1. a mote, a speck, something very small and unimportant

Usage notes

  • The form grann is used in the adverb litegrann (a bit), which in older texts can be written litet grand.
  • Phrases like vi åt lunch på Grand, refer to a “Grand Hotel” available in several towns

Declension


Walloon

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes, feminine plural (before noun) grandès)

  1. large, big


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /səˈblaɪm/
  • Rhymes: -aɪm

Etymology 1

From Middle English sublimen, borrowed from Old French sublimer, from Latin sublimō (to raise on high; to sublimate (in Medieval Latin)).

Verb

sublime (third-person singular simple present sublimes, present participle subliming, simple past and past participle sublimed)

  1. (chemistry, physics, transitive, intransitive) To sublimate.
  2. (transitive) To raise on high.
    • 1857, E. P. Whipple, Harper’s Magazine
      a soul sublimed by an idea above the region of vanity and conceit
  3. (transitive) To exalt; to heighten; to improve; to purify.
    Synonym: (archaic) sublimate
  4. (transitive) To dignify; to ennoble.
    • a. 1667, Jeremy Taylor, Clerus Domini, or, A discourse of the divine institution, necessity, sacredness, and separation of the office ministerial together with the nature and manner of its power and operation
      An ordinary gift cannot sublime a person to a supernatural employment.
Related terms
  • sublimation
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle French sublime, from Latin sublīmis (high), from sub- (up to, upwards) + a root of uncertain affiliation often identified with Latin līmis, ablative singular of līmus (oblique) or līmen (threshold, entrance, lintel)

Adjective

sublime (comparative sublimer, superlative sublimest)

  1. Noble and majestic.
    • 1842, Thomas De Quincey, Cicero (published in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine)
      the sublime Julian leader
  2. Impressive and awe-inspiring, yet simple.
  3. (obsolete) Lifted up; high in place; exalted aloft; uplifted; lofty.
    • Sublime on these a tower of steel is reared.
  4. (obsolete) Elevated by joy; elated.
  5. Lofty of mien; haughty; proud.
Related terms
  • subliminal
Translations

Noun

sublime (plural sublimes)

  1. Something sublime.
Translations

Anagrams

  • blueism

Danish

Adjective

sublime

  1. definite of sublim
  2. plural of sublim

French

Etymology

From Middle French sublime, borrowed from Latin sublimis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sy.blim/
  • Rhymes: -im

Adjective

sublime (plural sublimes)

  1. sublime, extraordinary

Derived terms

  • Sublime Porte

Verb

sublime

  1. inflection of sublimer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

  • “sublime” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

German

Pronunciation

Adjective

sublime

  1. inflection of sublim:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin sublimis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /suˈbli.me/

Adjective

sublime (plural sublimi)

  1. sublime

Related terms

  • sublimità

Latin

Adjective

sublīme

  1. vocative masculine singular of sublīmus

References

  • sublime in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sublime in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sublime in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.

Middle French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin sublīmus.

Adjective

sublime m or f (plural sublimes)

  1. sublime (noble, majestic, magnificent, etc.)

Descendants

  • French: sublime

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /su.ˈbli.mɪ/
  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /su.ˈbli.mɨ/
  • Hyphenation: su‧bli‧me

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin sublīmis.

Adjective

sublime m or f (plural sublimes, comparable)

  1. sublime

Noun

sublime m, f (plural sublimes)

  1. sublime

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

sublime

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of sublimar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of sublimar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of sublimar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of sublimar

Related terms


Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /suˈblime/, [suˈβ̞li.me]

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin sublimis.

Adjective

sublime (plural sublimes)

  1. sublime

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

sublime

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of sublimar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of sublimar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of sublimar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of sublimar.

Further reading

  • “sublime” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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