grand vs thou what difference

what is difference between grand and thou

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹænd/
  • Rhymes: -ænd

Etymology 1

From Middle English grand, grond, graund, graunt, from Anglo-Norman graunt, from Old French grant, from Latin grandis. Doublet of grande and grandee.

Alternative forms

  • grande

Adjective

grand (comparative grander or more grand, superlative grandest or most grand)

  1. Of a large size or extent; great.
    a grand mountain
    a grand army
    a grand mistake
  2. Great in size, and fine or imposing in appearance or impression; illustrious, dignified, magnificent.
    a grand monarch
    a grand view
    His simple vision has transformed into something far more grand.
  3. Having higher rank or more dignity, size, or importance than other persons or things of the same name.
    a grand lodge
    a grand vizier
    a grand piano
    The Grand Viziers of the Ottoman Empire.
  4. (usually in compound forms) Standing in the second or some more remote degree of parentage or descent (see grand-).
    grandfather, grandson, grand-child
  5. (Ireland, Northern England, colloquial, otherwise dated) Fine; lovely.
  6. (music) Containing all the parts proper to a given form of composition.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

grand (plural grands or grand)

  1. (plural “grand”) A thousand of some unit of currency, such as dollars or pounds. (Compare G.)
    For quotations using this term, see Citations:grand.
  2. (music, plural “grands”) A grand piano
Translations

Etymology 2

From granddaughter, grandfather, grandmother, grandson, etc.

Noun

grand (plural grands)

  1. A grandparent or grandchild.
    • 1987, Toni Morrison, Beloved, page 269:
      Once, in Maryland, he met four families of slaves who had all been together for a hundred years: great-grands, grands, mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, cousins, children.
    • 2012, Brenda Jackson, Texas Wild & Beyond Temptation, page 47:
      Her granddaughter and great-granddaughter went with us as chaperones. Did I ever tell you that she had six grands and two great-grands? [] And Emily agrees with me it’s a shame that I don’t even have a grand.

Further reading

  • grand in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • DRAGN

Bourguignon

Etymology

From Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand (feminine grand or grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grands or grandes)

  1. big

French

Etymology

From Middle French grand, from Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʁɑ̃/, (followed by vowel or h muet) /ɡʁɑ̃.t‿/

Adjective

grand (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes)

  1. big, great, grand
  2. tall
  3. (usually capitalized) Great, an honorific title
  4. great; big fat; an intensifier
  5. extensive, large

Derived terms

See also

  • grand-mère
  • grand-père
  • grand-chose

Further reading

  • “grand” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian

Alternative forms

  • grant (standard orthography)

Adjective

grand

  1. Alternative form of grant

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse grand (injury, hurt).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /krant/
  • Rhymes: -ant

Noun

grand n (genitive singular grands, nominative plural grönd)

  1. damage, harm, destruction
  2. (card games) absence of trump cards/suits

Declension

Synonyms

  • mein
  • skaði
  • óskundi

Related terms

  • granda

Lombard

Etymology

Akin to Italian grande, from Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand

  1. big, large

Middle French

Alternative forms

  • grant

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes) (comparative greigneur, superlative greigneur)

  1. big; large

Descendants

  • French: grand

Norman

Alternative forms

  • grànd (Guernsey)

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrɑ̃/, /ɡrɔ̃/
  • (Jersey)

Adjective

grand m

  1. (Jersey) big

Derived terms


Occitan

Etymology

From Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular granda, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandas)

  1. big, large
    Antonyms: pichon, petit

Derived terms

  • grandament
  • grandàs
  • grandesa

Further reading

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 538.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrant/

Etymology 1

From Spanish grande.

Noun

grand m pers

  1. grandee (high-ranking Spanish nobleman)
Declension

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

grand

  1. genitive plural of granda

Further reading

  • grand in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • grand in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) grond
  • (Sutsilvan) grànd

Etymology

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular granda, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandas)

  1. (Puter) big, large
  2. (Puter) tall

Swedish

Noun

grand n

  1. a mote, a speck, something very small and unimportant

Usage notes

  • The form grann is used in the adverb litegrann (a bit), which in older texts can be written litet grand.
  • Phrases like vi åt lunch på Grand, refer to a “Grand Hotel” available in several towns

Declension


Walloon

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes, feminine plural (before noun) grandès)

  1. large, big


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English thou, tho, thogh, thoue, thouȝ, thow, thowe, tou, towe, thu, thue, thugh, tu, you (Northern England), ðhu, þeou, þeu, þou (the latter three early Southwest England), from Old English þū, from Proto-West Germanic *þū, from Proto-Germanic *þū (you (singular), thou), from Proto-Indo-European *túh₂ (you, thou).

Alternative forms

  • tha (Yorkshire, Lancashire)
  • thow, thu (Scotland)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: thou, IPA(key): /ðaʊ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ

Pronoun

thou (plural ye, objective case thee, reflexive thyself, possessive determiner thy or thine, possessive pronoun thine)

  1. (archaic, dialectal, literary, religion, or humorous) Nominative singular of ye (you). [chiefly up to early 17th c.]
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:thou.
Usage notes
  • When the subject of a verb in the indicative mood is thou, the verb usually ends in -est, in both the present and simple past tenses, as in “Lovest thou me?” (from John 21:17 of the King James Bible). This is the case even for modal verbs, which do not specially conjugate for the third person singular. A few verbs have irregular present forms: art (of be), hast (of have), dost (of do), wost (of wit), canst (of can), shalt (of shall), wilt (of will). Must does not change. In weak past tenses, the ending is either -edest or contracted -edst. In the subjunctive, as is normal, the bare form is usually used. However, thou beest is sometimes used instead of thou be.
  • Traditionally, use of thou and ye followed the T–V distinction, thou being the informal pronoun and ye, the plural, being used in its place in formal situations. This is preserved in the dialects in which thou is still in everyday use, but in Standard English, due to the pronoun’s association with religious texts and poetry, some speakers find it more solemn or even formal.
  • Occasionally thou was, and to a lesser extent still is, used to represent a translated language’s second-person singular-plural distinction, disregarding English’s T-V distinction by translating the second-person singular as thou even where English would likely use ye instead. It is also sometimes still used to represent a translated language’s T-V distinction.
Alternative forms
  • du, tha, thoo, thow, thu
Derived terms
Translations
See also

Etymology 2

From Late Middle English thouen, theu, thew, thou, thowe, thowen, thui, thuy (to address (a person) with thou, particularly in a contemptuous or polite manner), from the pronoun thou: see etymology 1 above.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: thou, IPA(key): /ðaʊ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ

Verb

thou (third-person singular simple present thous, present participle thouing, simple past and past participle thoued)

  1. (transitive) To address (a person) using the pronoun thou, especially as an expression of contempt or familiarity.
    Synonym: thee
    Antonym: you
  2. (intransitive) To use the word thou.
    Synonym: thee
    Antonym: you
Translations

Etymology 3

Short for thou(sandth).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: thou, IPA(key): /θaʊ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ

Noun

thou (plural thous)

  1. (Britain, dated) A unit of length equal to one-thousandth of an inch.
    Synonym: (US) mil

Etymology 4

Short for thou(sand).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: thou, IPA(key): /θaʊ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ

Noun

thou (plural thou)

  1. (slang) A thousand, especially a thousand of some currency (dollars, pounds sterling, etc.).

Etymology 5

A misspelling of though.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: thō, IPA(key): /ðəʊ/
  • (General American) enPR: thō, IPA(key): /ðoʊ/

Adverb

thou (not comparable)

  1. Misspelling of though.

Conjunction

thou

  1. Misspelling of though.

References

Further reading

  • thou on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • thou (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Hout, Huot, hout

Middle English

Pronoun

thou (objective the, possessive determiner thy, possessive pronoun thyn)

  1. Alternative form of þou

References

  • “thǒu, pron.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 5 May 2018.

Scots

Alternative forms

  • du, thoo

Etymology

From Middle English þou, from Old English þū, from Proto-Germanic *þū, from Proto-Indo-European *túh₂ (you).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ðu/
  • (Orkney, Shetland) IPA(key): /du/

Pronoun

thou (objective case thee, reflexive thysel, possessive determiner thy)

  1. (archaic outside Orkney and Shetland) thou, you (2nd person singular subject pronoun, informal)

Usage notes

  • Regularly used throughout Scotland up until the middle of the 1800s; now only used as an archaism outside Shetland and Orkney.

References

  • “thou, pers. pron, v.” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.

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