grand vs thousand what difference

what is difference between grand and thousand

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹænd/
  • Rhymes: -ænd

Etymology 1

From Middle English grand, grond, graund, graunt, from Anglo-Norman graunt, from Old French grant, from Latin grandis. Doublet of grande and grandee.

Alternative forms

  • grande

Adjective

grand (comparative grander or more grand, superlative grandest or most grand)

  1. Of a large size or extent; great.
    a grand mountain
    a grand army
    a grand mistake
  2. Great in size, and fine or imposing in appearance or impression; illustrious, dignified, magnificent.
    a grand monarch
    a grand view
    His simple vision has transformed into something far more grand.
  3. Having higher rank or more dignity, size, or importance than other persons or things of the same name.
    a grand lodge
    a grand vizier
    a grand piano
    The Grand Viziers of the Ottoman Empire.
  4. (usually in compound forms) Standing in the second or some more remote degree of parentage or descent (see grand-).
    grandfather, grandson, grand-child
  5. (Ireland, Northern England, colloquial, otherwise dated) Fine; lovely.
  6. (music) Containing all the parts proper to a given form of composition.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

grand (plural grands or grand)

  1. (plural “grand”) A thousand of some unit of currency, such as dollars or pounds. (Compare G.)
    For quotations using this term, see Citations:grand.
  2. (music, plural “grands”) A grand piano
Translations

Etymology 2

From granddaughter, grandfather, grandmother, grandson, etc.

Noun

grand (plural grands)

  1. A grandparent or grandchild.
    • 1987, Toni Morrison, Beloved, page 269:
      Once, in Maryland, he met four families of slaves who had all been together for a hundred years: great-grands, grands, mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, cousins, children.
    • 2012, Brenda Jackson, Texas Wild & Beyond Temptation, page 47:
      Her granddaughter and great-granddaughter went with us as chaperones. Did I ever tell you that she had six grands and two great-grands? [] And Emily agrees with me it’s a shame that I don’t even have a grand.

Further reading

  • grand in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • DRAGN

Bourguignon

Etymology

From Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand (feminine grand or grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grands or grandes)

  1. big

French

Etymology

From Middle French grand, from Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʁɑ̃/, (followed by vowel or h muet) /ɡʁɑ̃.t‿/

Adjective

grand (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes)

  1. big, great, grand
  2. tall
  3. (usually capitalized) Great, an honorific title
  4. great; big fat; an intensifier
  5. extensive, large

Derived terms

See also

  • grand-mère
  • grand-père
  • grand-chose

Further reading

  • “grand” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian

Alternative forms

  • grant (standard orthography)

Adjective

grand

  1. Alternative form of grant

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse grand (injury, hurt).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /krant/
  • Rhymes: -ant

Noun

grand n (genitive singular grands, nominative plural grönd)

  1. damage, harm, destruction
  2. (card games) absence of trump cards/suits

Declension

Synonyms

  • mein
  • skaði
  • óskundi

Related terms

  • granda

Lombard

Etymology

Akin to Italian grande, from Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand

  1. big, large

Middle French

Alternative forms

  • grant

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes) (comparative greigneur, superlative greigneur)

  1. big; large

Descendants

  • French: grand

Norman

Alternative forms

  • grànd (Guernsey)

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrɑ̃/, /ɡrɔ̃/
  • (Jersey)

Adjective

grand m

  1. (Jersey) big

Derived terms


Occitan

Etymology

From Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular granda, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandas)

  1. big, large
    Antonyms: pichon, petit

Derived terms

  • grandament
  • grandàs
  • grandesa

Further reading

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 538.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrant/

Etymology 1

From Spanish grande.

Noun

grand m pers

  1. grandee (high-ranking Spanish nobleman)
Declension

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

grand

  1. genitive plural of granda

Further reading

  • grand in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • grand in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) grond
  • (Sutsilvan) grànd

Etymology

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular granda, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandas)

  1. (Puter) big, large
  2. (Puter) tall

Swedish

Noun

grand n

  1. a mote, a speck, something very small and unimportant

Usage notes

  • The form grann is used in the adverb litegrann (a bit), which in older texts can be written litet grand.
  • Phrases like vi åt lunch på Grand, refer to a “Grand Hotel” available in several towns

Declension


Walloon

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes, feminine plural (before noun) grandès)

  1. large, big


Translingual

Etymology

From English thousand

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈtauˈzænd] [sic]

Numeral

thousand

  1. Code word for combinations of thousand (that is, the digits 000 or the thousands spacer) in the NATO/ICAO spelling alphabet
    one zero thousand nine four six meter (10,946 m)

Usage notes

The code word ‘thousand’ is used when reciting distances (including altitudes), but not for serial numbers. That is, a serial number 10,946 would be read simply as its digits: one zero nine four six.

References


English

Alternative forms

  • Arabic numerals: 1000 (see for numerical forms in other scripts)
  • Roman numerals: M
  • ISO prefix: kilo-
  • Exponential notation: 103

Etymology

From Middle English thousend, thusand, from Old English þūsend (thousand), from Proto-West Germanic *þūsundi, from Proto-Germanic *þūsundī (thousand), (compare Scots thousand (thousand), Saterland Frisian duusend (thousand), West Frisian tûzen (thousand), Dutch duizend (thousand), German tausend (thousand), Danish tusind (thousand), Swedish tusen (thousand), Norwegian tusen (thousand), Icelandic þúsund (thousand), Faroese túsund (thousand)), from Proto-Indo-European *tuHsont-, *tuHsenti- (compare Lithuanian tūkstantis (thousand), Russian ты́сяча (týsjača)).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈθaʊzənd/, IPA(key): [ˈθaʊzn̩d]
  • (US) enPR: thou′zənd, IPA(key): /ˈθaʊz(ə)nd/, [ˈθaʊ̯zɹ̩nd]
  • Hyphenation: thou‧sand

Numeral

thousand (plural thousands)

  1. A numerical value equal to 1,000 = 10 × 100 = 103

Usage notes

Unlike cardinal numerals such as ten or ninety-nine (where one can say e.g. there were ten men present), the word thousand is a noun like dozen and needs a determiner or another numeral to function as a numeral: one cannot say *there were thousand men present, but must say:

  • there were a thousand men / one thousand men / forty-three thousand men present
  • one can also speak of the thousand men, several thousand men, or some thousand men who were present
  • compare a dozen men / one dozen men / forty-three dozen men, the dozen men, several dozen men, some dozen men

When preceded by a determiner or numeral and followed by of, it can be singular or plural:

  • two thousand of the inhabitants died, several thousand of the inhabitants fled
  • many thousands of women marched
  • “Aragorn should find some two thousands of those that he had gathered to him in the South; but Imrahil should find three and a half thousands; and Éomer five hundreds of the Rohirrim who were unhorsed but themselves warworthy.” (J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King)

When followed by of and not preceded by a determiner or numeral, it must be pluralized with -s: thousands of women protested, countless thousands of women voted, not *thousand of women.

Synonyms

  • (numerical): a thousand, one thousand

Derived terms

See also

  • Appendix:Words used as placeholders to count seconds

Descendants

  • Hawaiian: kaukani

Translations

Anagrams

  • handouts, hands out

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