grand vs yard what difference

what is difference between grand and yard

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹænd/
  • Rhymes: -ænd

Etymology 1

From Middle English grand, grond, graund, graunt, from Anglo-Norman graunt, from Old French grant, from Latin grandis. Doublet of grande and grandee.

Alternative forms

  • grande

Adjective

grand (comparative grander or more grand, superlative grandest or most grand)

  1. Of a large size or extent; great.
    a grand mountain
    a grand army
    a grand mistake
  2. Great in size, and fine or imposing in appearance or impression; illustrious, dignified, magnificent.
    a grand monarch
    a grand view
    His simple vision has transformed into something far more grand.
  3. Having higher rank or more dignity, size, or importance than other persons or things of the same name.
    a grand lodge
    a grand vizier
    a grand piano
    The Grand Viziers of the Ottoman Empire.
  4. (usually in compound forms) Standing in the second or some more remote degree of parentage or descent (see grand-).
    grandfather, grandson, grand-child
  5. (Ireland, Northern England, colloquial, otherwise dated) Fine; lovely.
  6. (music) Containing all the parts proper to a given form of composition.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Noun

grand (plural grands or grand)

  1. (plural “grand”) A thousand of some unit of currency, such as dollars or pounds. (Compare G.)
    For quotations using this term, see Citations:grand.
  2. (music, plural “grands”) A grand piano
Translations

Etymology 2

From granddaughter, grandfather, grandmother, grandson, etc.

Noun

grand (plural grands)

  1. A grandparent or grandchild.
    • 1987, Toni Morrison, Beloved, page 269:
      Once, in Maryland, he met four families of slaves who had all been together for a hundred years: great-grands, grands, mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, cousins, children.
    • 2012, Brenda Jackson, Texas Wild & Beyond Temptation, page 47:
      Her granddaughter and great-granddaughter went with us as chaperones. Did I ever tell you that she had six grands and two great-grands? [] And Emily agrees with me it’s a shame that I don’t even have a grand.

Further reading

  • grand in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • DRAGN

Bourguignon

Etymology

From Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand (feminine grand or grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grands or grandes)

  1. big

French

Etymology

From Middle French grand, from Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʁɑ̃/, (followed by vowel or h muet) /ɡʁɑ̃.t‿/

Adjective

grand (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes)

  1. big, great, grand
  2. tall
  3. (usually capitalized) Great, an honorific title
  4. great; big fat; an intensifier
  5. extensive, large

Derived terms

See also

  • grand-mère
  • grand-père
  • grand-chose

Further reading

  • “grand” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian

Alternative forms

  • grant (standard orthography)

Adjective

grand

  1. Alternative form of grant

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse grand (injury, hurt).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /krant/
  • Rhymes: -ant

Noun

grand n (genitive singular grands, nominative plural grönd)

  1. damage, harm, destruction
  2. (card games) absence of trump cards/suits

Declension

Synonyms

  • mein
  • skaði
  • óskundi

Related terms

  • granda

Lombard

Etymology

Akin to Italian grande, from Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand

  1. big, large

Middle French

Alternative forms

  • grant

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes) (comparative greigneur, superlative greigneur)

  1. big; large

Descendants

  • French: grand

Norman

Alternative forms

  • grànd (Guernsey)

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrɑ̃/, /ɡrɔ̃/
  • (Jersey)

Adjective

grand m

  1. (Jersey) big

Derived terms


Occitan

Etymology

From Latin grandis.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular granda, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandas)

  1. big, large
    Antonyms: pichon, petit

Derived terms

  • grandament
  • grandàs
  • grandesa

Further reading

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 538.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrant/

Etymology 1

From Spanish grande.

Noun

grand m pers

  1. grandee (high-ranking Spanish nobleman)
Declension

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

grand

  1. genitive plural of granda

Further reading

  • grand in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • grand in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) grond
  • (Sutsilvan) grànd

Etymology

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular granda, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandas)

  1. (Puter) big, large
  2. (Puter) tall

Swedish

Noun

grand n

  1. a mote, a speck, something very small and unimportant

Usage notes

  • The form grann is used in the adverb litegrann (a bit), which in older texts can be written litet grand.
  • Phrases like vi åt lunch på Grand, refer to a “Grand Hotel” available in several towns

Declension


Walloon

Etymology

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

grand m (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes, feminine plural (before noun) grandès)

  1. large, big


English

Alternative forms

  • yaird (obsolete, Scotland)
  • yeard (archaic)
  • yerd (obsolete)
  • yod (pronunciation spelling)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /jɑːd/
  • (General American) enPR: yärd, IPA(key): /jɑɹd/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)d

Etymology 1

From Middle English yerd, yard, ȝerd, ȝeard, from Old English ġeard (yard, garden, fence, enclosure, enclosed place, court, residence, dwelling, home, region, land; hedge), from Proto-Germanic *gardaz (enclosure, yard) (compare Dutch gaard, obsolete German Gart, Swedish and Norwegian Bokmål gård, Norwegian Nynorsk gard), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰórdʰos, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰerdʰ- (to enclose) (Lithuanian gardas (pen, enclosure), Russian го́род (górod, town), Albanian gardh (fence), Romanian gard, Avestan ????????????????????????????(gərədha, dev’s cave), Sanskrit गृह (gṛha)), Medieval Latin gardinus, Medieval Latin jardinus. Doublet of garden.

Noun

yard (plural yards)

  1. A small, usually uncultivated area adjoining or (now especially) within the precincts of a house or other building.
  2. (US, Canada, Australia) The property surrounding one’s house, typically dominated by one’s lawn.
    Synonym: (UK) garden
  3. An enclosed area designated for a specific purpose, e.g. on farms, railways etc.
  4. A place where moose or deer herd together in winter for pasture, protection, etc.
  5. (Jamaican, MLE) One’s house or home.
Derived terms

See also Yard

Translations

Verb

yard (third-person singular simple present yards, present participle yarding, simple past and past participle yarded)

  1. (transitive) To confine to a yard.

Etymology 2

From Middle English ȝerde, yerd, ȝerd, from Old English ġierd (branch; rod, staff; measuring stick; yardland), from Proto-West Germanic *gaʀd, from Proto-Germanic *gazdaz. Cognate with Dutch gard (twig), German Gerte and probably related to Latin hasta (spear).

Noun

yard (plural yards)

  1. A unit of length equal to 3 feet in the US customary and British imperial systems of measurement, equal to precisely 0.9144 m since 1959 (US) or 1963 (UK).
  2. Units of similar composition or length in other systems.
  3. (nautical) Any spar carried aloft.
    1. (nautical) A long tapered timber hung on a mast to which is bent a sail, and may be further qualified as a square, lateen, or lug yard. The first is hung at right angles to the mast, the latter two hang obliquely.
  4. (obsolete) A branch, twig, or shoot.
  5. (obsolete) A staff, rod, or stick.
  6. (obsolete, medicine) A penis.
  7. (US, slang, uncommon) 100 dollars.
  8. (obsolete) The yardland, an obsolete English unit of land roughly understood as 30 acres.
    • a. 1634, W. Noye, The Complete Lawyer, 57:
      You must note, that two Fardells of Land make a Nooke of Land, and two Nookes make halfe a Yard of Land.
  9. (obsolete) The rod, a surveying unit of (once) 15 or (now) 16+12 feet.
  10. (obsolete) The rood, area bound by a square rod, 14 acre.
Synonyms
  • (arm length): See ell
  • ($100): See hundred
  • (surveying measure): See rod
  • (large unit of area): See virgate
  • (small unit of area): See rood
Hypernyms
  • (unit of area): See virgate
Hyponyms
  • (unit of area): See virgate
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Clipping of milliard.

Noun

yard (plural yards)

  1. (finance) 109, A short scale billion; a long scale thousand millions or milliard.
    I need to hedge a yard of yen.

References

Anagrams

  • Dray, Dyar, Rady, adry, dray

Czech

Noun

yard m

  1. yard (unit of length)

Further reading

  • yard in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • yard in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

French

Etymology

From English yard.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jaʁd/

Noun

yard m (plural yards)

  1. yard (unit of length)

Further reading

  • “yard” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

From English yard.

Noun

yard f (plural yards)

  1. yard (unit of length)
    Synonym: iarda

Further reading

  • yard in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Jamaican Creole

Alternative forms

  • yaad, yawd

Etymology

From English yard.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɑːd/, /jɔːd/
  • Hyphenation: yard

Noun

yard

  1. home

Noun

yard (plural: yard dem, quantified: yard)

  1. yard

Further reading

  • Richard Allsopp (main editor), Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage, 2003 (reprint by The University of the West Indies Press, originally 1996 by Oxford University Press), ISBN 9789766401450 (originally ISBN-10: 976-640-145-4), page 617

Middle English

Noun

yard

  1. Alternative form of yerd

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