grandiloquent vs overblown what difference

what is difference between grandiloquent and overblown

English

Etymology

From Middle French grandiloquent, from Latin grandiloquus, from grandis (great, full) + loquēns, present participle of loquor (I speak). Compare eloquent.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, US) IPA(key): /ɡɹænˈdɪl.ə.kwənt/

Adjective

grandiloquent (comparative more grandiloquent, superlative most grandiloquent)

  1. (of a person, their language or writing) Given to using language in a showy way by using an excessive amount of difficult words to impress others; bombastic; turgid

Synonyms

  • (overly wordy or elaborate): See Thesaurus:verbose

Related terms

Translations


French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin grandiloquus, remodelled after éloquent.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʁɑ̃.di.lɔ.kɑ̃/

Adjective

grandiloquent (feminine singular grandiloquente, masculine plural grandiloquents, feminine plural grandiloquentes)

  1. grandiloquent
    Synonym: pompeux

Related terms

  • grandiloquence

Further reading

  • “grandiloquent” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -əʊn

Adjective

overblown (comparative more overblown, superlative most overblown)

  1. Of exaggerated importance; too heavily emphasized, hyped, etc.
    They went all that way just to be in some overblown conference?

Synonyms

  • inflated

Translations

Verb

overblown

  1. past participle of overblow

Anagrams

  • blown over

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