granny vs nan what difference

what is difference between granny and nan

English

Etymology 1

  • gran(nam) +‎ -y

Alternative forms

  • grammy (less common)
  • grannie (less common)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɹæni/
  • Rhymes: -æni
  • Hyphenation: gran‧ny

Noun

granny (plural grannies)

  1. (colloquial) A grandmother.
    I’m going to be a granny.
  2. (colloquial, derogatory) An elderly woman.
    There are too many grannies around here getting in the way.
  3. (knots) A granny knot.
    • 1977, Stephen King, Children of the Corn
      The suitcase was old. The brown leather was battered and scuffed. Two hanks of clothesline had been wrapped around it and tied in large, clownish grannies.
  4. (farming, colloquial) An older ewe that may lure a lamb away from its mother.
Synonyms
  • (grandmother): gran, grandma, nan, nanna, nanny
  • (elderly woman): old dear
Derived terms
  • granny knot
Translations

Adjective

granny (not comparable)

  1. (informal) typically or stereotypically old-fashioned, especially in clothing and accessories worn by or associated with elderly women.
    granny dress; granny glasses

Verb

granny (third-person singular simple present grannies, present participle grannying, simple past and past participle grannied)

  1. (informal, intransitive) To be a grandmother.
  2. (informal, intransitive) To act like a stereotypical grandmother; to fuss.

Etymology 2

  • gran(d) +‎ -y

Noun

granny (plural grannies)

  1. (Australia, colloquial) A grand final.
    • 2007, Steve Bedwell, Vizard Uncut, Melbourne University Publish (→ISBN), page 30:
      On the morning of the ‘granny’, the three Vizards would hop into Godfrey’s Dodge and head off towards the MCG.
    • 2016, Brent Harvey, Boomer, Macmillan Publishers Aus. (→ISBN)
      Jase was controversially suspended and prevented from playing in the granny.
    • 2020, Marlion Pickett, Dave Warner, Belief, Simon and Schuster (→ISBN)
      “Dad, I got some good news and bad news. Good news is I’ll be playing in the granny. Bad news is you’ll have to hop on a plane.”

Anagrams

  • nangry


English

Etymology 1

From Nan, pet form of the formerly very common female given names Anne and Agnes. As a nursemaid and grandmother, a clipping of earlier nana, from nanny under the probable influence of mama, also from Nan. Compare Mary.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /næn/
  • Rhymes: -æn

Noun

nan (plural nans)

  1. (obsolete) Synonym of maid: a servant girl. [1599]
  2. (slang, obsolete) Synonym of nancy: an effeminate male homosexual. [1670]
  3. (Britain, endearing) Synonym of nursemaid. [1940]
  4. (Britain, endearing) Synonym of grandmother. [1955]
    We had my nan over for Christmas dinner.

Etymology 2

See at naan.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /næn/, /nɑːn/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /næn/, /nɑn/

Noun

nan (plural nans)

  1. Alternative spelling of naan

Anagrams

  • ANN, Ann, Ann., ann, ann.

Acehnese

Noun

nan

  1. name (word or phrase indicating a particular person, place, class or thing)

References

  • 2007. The UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Department of Linguistics.

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin nānus, from Ancient Greek νᾶνος (nânos).

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈnan/

Adjective

nan (feminine nana, masculine plural nans, feminine plural nanes)

  1. (attributive) dwarf

Derived terms

  • planeta nan

Noun

nan m (plural nans, feminine nana)

  1. (mythology) dwarf (a member of a race from folklore)
  2. dwarf (a person of short stature, usually as the result of a genetic condition)
  3. (folklore) in Catalan celebrations, someone who wears a large papier-mâché head

Derived terms

  • nanisme

Further reading

  • “nan” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “nan” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “nan” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “nan” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Franco-Provençal

Pronunciation

  • (Savoyard dialect) IPA(key): /ˈnɑ/
  • (Bressan dialect) IPA(key): /ˈnɔ̃/

Interjection

nan

  1. no

Antonyms

  • ouè

Adverb

nan

  1. no

Antonyms

  • ouè

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɑ̃/

Adverb

nan

  1. (informal) nah, nope

Synonyms

  • non (standard French)

Haitian Creole

Article

nan

  1. the (definite article)

Usage notes

This word is used only when the preceding word is singular and ends with a nasal consonant.

See also

  • a
  • an
  • la
  • lan
  • yo
  • yon

Preposition

nan

  1. in

Japanese

Romanization

nan

  1. Rōmaji transcription of なん

Lombard

Etymology

Akin to Italian nano, ultimately from Greek νᾶνος.

Noun

nan

  1. dwarf

Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nan/

Noun

nan m (diminutive nancycko)

  1. father

Declension

Coordinate terms

  • maś (mother)
  • syn (son)
  • źowka (daughter)

Further reading

  • Arnošt Muka (1921, 1928), “nan”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German, Russian), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted (in German)Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • nan in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Makolkol

Noun

nan

  1. mother

Further reading

  • Joshua Arlo, Indigenous language almost extinct, 2 September 2016, LoopPNG

Malecite-Passamaquoddy

Etymology

From Proto-Algonquian *nya·θanwi.

Numeral

nan

  1. five

Mandarin

Romanization

nan (Zhuyin ˙ㄋㄢ)

  1. Nonstandard spelling of nān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of nán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of nǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of nàn.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Northern Kurdish

Etymology 1

Akin to Persian نان(nān), See there for more.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɑːn/

Noun

nan m

  1. bread
  2. food
    Synonym: xwarin

Declension

Etymology 2

Verb

nan

  1. to put in, to set, to place
  2. to fuck, to copulate, to have sex with

Old English

Etymology

From ne (not) +‎ ān (one).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɑːn/

Determiner

nān

  1. no; not a, not one, not any
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, Extracts on Grammar in English

Pronoun

nān

  1. no one, nobody; none
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, “The Nativity of St. Clement the Martyr”

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: noon
    • English: none
    • Scots: nane

Old Frisian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈnaːn/

Determiner

nān

  1. Alternative form of nēn

Pronoun

nān

  1. Alternative form of nēn

References

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Papiamentu

Etymology

The third person plural pronoun nan (they) and the overall plural noun suffix -nan are unique for Papiamentu and cannot be found in any other language. According to Clements and Parkvall the pronoun nan and it’s derived suffix -nan were introduced into the language just in the 1700s because of the grown need for a plural marking. Apparently before the introduction the need for a plural marking was not felt. Just like in other South American languages the suffix originated in the form “kas-nan” literally “house-they” (ac Lenz).

Compare the Curripaco Arawak suffix -na and the Dutch suffix -en.

Searches are being undertaken to find the African connections with the words “iran”, “ene”, “na”, “nan”, “inen” and “ane” in the languages Bini, Kwa, Anabonese, Bantu, Kimbundu, Angolar, Fa d’Ambu, Edo and Saotome in the African countries of Sao Tomé, Angola, Equatorial Guinea and Nigeria (see Bartens and Schuchardt). All very improbably.

Pronoun

nan

  1. they, third person plural
  2. their

See also

  • -nan

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology 1

Conjunction

nan

  1. if (subjunctive)
    Nan robh mi beartach, b’urrainn dhomh cheannaich taigh-mòr. – If I were rich, I could buy a mansion.
  2. whether (subjunctive)
    Biodh gràdh agam air fhathast nan robh e beartach neo bochd. – I would still love him whether he were rich or poor.
Usage notes
  • Before words beginning with b, f, m or p, the form nam is used instead.
  • Only used in the conditional tense, otherwise ma is used.
  • The negative form is mura.

Etymology 2

Univerbation of an (in) +‎ an (their).

Preposition

nan (+ dative, triggers eclipsis)

  1. in their
Inflection

Etymology 3

Article

nan

  1. inflection of an (the):
    1. genitive plural preceding a consonant (excluding b-, f-, m-, p-)
    2. genitive plural preceding a vowel
Declension

Upper Sorbian

Noun

nan m

  1. father

Declension


Vietnamese

Etymology

According to Ferlus (2009), from *t-rn-aːɲ, with nominalizer -rn- infixed into Proto-Vietic *taːɲ (whence đan (to weave)).

Formationally indentical but independently developed are Khmu [Rook] tʰrnaːɲ (“material used for weaving”) (Suwilai, 2002) and Proto-West-Bahnaric *trnaːɲ (“thread”), whence Nyaheun nnaːɲ (“thread”).

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [naːn˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [naːŋ˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [naːŋ˧˧]

Noun

nan

  1. bamboo tape (for basketwork); bamboo slat (of a paper fan)

Wolof

Adverb

nan

  1. (interrogative) how

See also

  • naka

Zazaki

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈnɑn]
  • Hyphenation: nan

Etymology

Akin to Persian نان(nān, bread), see there for more.

Alternative forms

  • non
  • nun

Noun

nan m

  1. bread

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