grapple vs grip what difference

what is difference between grapple and grip

English

Alternative forms

  • graple (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: grăpʹəl, IPA(key): /ˈɡɹæpəl/
  • Rhymes: -æpəl
  • Hyphenation: grap‧ple

Etymology 1

From Middle English *grapplen (to seize, lay hold of), from Old English *græpplian (to seize) (compare Old English ġegræppian (to seize)), from Proto-Germanic *graipilōną, *grabbalōną (to seize), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrebʰ- (to take, seize, rake), equivalent to grab +‎ -le. Cognate with Dutch grabbelen (to grope, scramble, scrabble), German grabbeln (to rummage, grope about) and grapsen, grapschen (to seize, grasp, grabble). Influenced in some senses by grapple (tool with claws or hooks, noun) (see below). See further at grasp.

Verb

grapple (third-person singular simple present grapples, present participle grappling, simple past and past participle grappled)

  1. (transitive) To seize something and hold it firmly.
  2. (intransitive) To wrestle or tussle.
  3. (figuratively, with with) To ponder and intensely evaluate a problem; to struggle to deal with.
Translations

Noun

grapple (countable and uncountable, plural grapples)

  1. A close hand-to-hand struggle
  2. The act of grappling (uncountable)
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English *grapple, *graple, from Old French grappil (a ship’s grapple) (compare Old French grappin (hook)), from Old French grape, grappe, crape (hook), of Germanic origin, from Frankish *krappō (hook), from Proto-Indo-European *grep- (hook), *gremb- (crooked, uneven), from Proto-Indo-European *ger- (to turn, bend, twist). See further at grape. Influenced in some senses by grapple (seize, verb) (see above).

Noun

grapple (plural grapples)

  1. A tool with claws or hooks which is used to catch or hold something.
    1. (nautical) A device consisting of iron claws, attached to the end of a rope, used for grasping and holding an enemy ship prior to boarding; a grappling iron.
    2. (nautical) A grapnel (type of anchor).
Translations

Verb

grapple (third-person singular simple present grapples, present participle grappling, simple past and past participle grappled)

  1. (transitive) To fasten, as with a grapple; (by extension) to fix; to join indissolubly.
    • The gallies were grapled to the Centurion.
    • 1901, Leonard Charles Smithers, Oriental Tales, page 291:
      [] he provided himself with thieves’ tackle and repaired to the house of the vizier in question, where he grappled a rope ladder with grappling irons to the battlements and climbed up to the roof of the palace .
    • 1914, Proceedings of the International Anti-vivisection and Animal Protection Congress, Held at Washington, D.C., December 8th to 11th, 1913, page 51:
      [Animals are hung] one by one, by a chain or rope grappled about a hind ankle, and carried, thus suspended, by an overhead device, to where the sticker stands. As rapidly as he can thrust his knife into the throat he does his work.
    • 1988, Roger Lichtenberg Simon, Raising the dead (→ISBN)
      Then I saw it — a figure swinging just above the arches, hanging from rope grappled to a lintel of an alcove fifty feet above. It had to be Gordie.
    • 1997, European Conference on Security and Detection – ECOS97, Incorporating the One Day Symposium on Technology Used for Combating Fraud: 28-30 April 1997, Venue, Commomwealth Institute, London
      These toppings impart a swaying motion to anyone climbing a rope grappled onto them, making climbing difficult. This form of topping is worthy of further study.
    • 2012, Rudy Rodriguez, Before There Was, Lulu.com (→ISBN), page 448:
      He had one of the ropes grappled around a ledge of a window and the other end around his ankle for safety purposes, not really expecting it to come into play. He falls at such an accelerated speed that when the rope becomes taut, it spikes …
    • 2014, Robert E. Waters, The Wayward Eight: A Contract to Die For, Winged Hussar Publishing (→ISBN):
      The men scrambled down the three ropes that had been grappled up the shaft.
    • 2015, Chris Allen, Avenger: The Alex Morgan Interpol Spy Thriller Series (Intrepid 3), Pan (→ISBN)
      Morgan recoiled, ready to fend off another attack, but the rope grappled him back against the fence.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To climb (whether by means of a grapple and rope, or by hand, etc).
    • 2012, Allen G. Davison, The Blessed (→ISBN), page 149:
      Sam quickly geared up and placed the first hook. “I am coming as well,” Alicia announced. [] Sam planted the anchor and then grappled down as Alicia struggled to move more than a foot or shift down.
    • 2016, Cora Buhlert, St. Nicholas of Hell’s Kitchen: An Silencer Holiday Story, Pegasus Pulp Publishing (→ISBN), page 27:
      In cases such as this, the Silencer usually grappled up the outside of the building. But Rumpus’ tower was sixty storeys tall []
    • 2016, Russ Katz, The Principal’s Daughter, Dog Ear Publishing (→ISBN), page 5:
      I made haste and grappled up the next branch, determined to get to the top first.
    • 2017, Edward W. Robertson, Freefall:
      MacAdams didn’t look back to see what they were up to, just ran across the flat roof and grappled down the other side of the building.
    • 2020, Adair Hart, The Earthborn Box Set: Books 1-3, Quantum Edge Publishing (→ISBN)
      He grappled up the tree and perched himself on a branch that gave him a good view over the most of the jungle.
    • 2020, Siddhartha Thorat, Operation Hellfire (Sristhi Publishers & Distributors, →ISBN)
      As soon as the snipers had confirmed that the roof was clear, the commandos had grappled up the five stories. They had used a grappling hook called Tactical Air Initiated Launch (TAIL) System which could shoot a grappling hook using []
  3. (intransitive) To use a grapple (for example to attempt to find, hook, and raise a net or cable).
    • 1912, Sessional Papers – Legislature of the Province of Ontario, page 126:
      The following days I spent patrolling the river and grappling for nets. On Wednesday , 18th July , left Gananoque at 7 a.m.; patrolled down to Rockport, []
    • 2012, Jamal Manassah, Innovations in Telecommunications, Elsevier (→ISBN), page 427:
      After returning from the cable factory with another load of cable and repeaters, the buoy will be recovered or the rope grappled for. When the previous section is aboard the ship, transmission tests are made []
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To hook and raise with a grapple.
    • 1861, Report of the Joint Committee Appointed by the Lords of the Committee of [Great British] Privy Council for Trade and the Atlantic Telegraph Company, page 263:
      The place where the cable got jammed and broken at the bottom was two or three miles from where I grappled up the cable the first time. I do not, of course, know for certain whether rocks with crevices exist.
    • 1908, New York (State). Court of Appeals., New York Court of Appeals. Records and Briefs:
      [page 11:] Weston had just grappled the net, when we saw the light corning up the lake.
      [page 15:] A. About an hour and a half after dark with Weston I rowed across to this point where the net was set, and he, with a grappling hook, grappled up the net.

Translations

References

  • “grapple”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: grĭp, IPA(key): /ɡɹɪp/
  • Rhymes: -ɪp

Etymology 1

From Middle English grippen, from Old English grippan, from a Proto-Germanic *gripjaną (compare Old High German gripfen); compare the related Old English grīpan, whence English gripe. See also grope, and the related Proto-Germanic *grīpaną.

Verb

grip (third-person singular simple present grips, present participle gripping, simple past and past participle gripped)

  1. (transitive) To take hold of, particularly with the hand.
  2. (transitive) To help or assist, particularly in an emotional sense.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      By and by fumes of brandy began to fill the air, and climb to where I lay, overcoming the mouldy smell of decayed wood and the dampness of the green walls. It may have been that these fumes mounted to my head, and gave me courage not my own, but so it was that I lost something of the stifling fear that had gripped me, and could listen with more ease to what was going forward
  3. (intransitive) To do something with another that makes you happy/gives you relief.
  4. To trench; to drain.
Synonyms
  • (take hold of): clasp, grasp; See also Thesaurus:grasp
  • (help or assist): aid, help out, lend a hand; See also Thesaurus:help
  • (do something happy with another): hang out
  • (trench):
Derived terms
  • begrip
  • gripping
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English grippe, gripe, an amalgam of Old English gripe (grasp, hold) (cognate with German Griff) and Old English gripa (handful) (cognate with Swedish grepp).

Noun

grip (countable and uncountable, plural grips)

  1. A hold or way of holding, particularly with the hand.
  2. A handle or other place to grip.
  3. (computing, graphical user interface) A visual component on a window etc. enabling it to be resized and/or moved.
  4. (film production) A person responsible for handling equipment on the set.
    Hyponym: key grip
    Coordinate terms: gaffer, gofer
  5. A channel cut through a grass verge (especially for the purpose of draining water away from the highway).
  6. (chiefly Southern California slang) A lot of something.
  7. (chiefly Southern California slang) A long time.
  8. Archaic spelling of grippe: Influenza, flu.
    • 1911, Theodore Dreiser, Jennie Gerhardt, Chapter XXXII:
      It so happened that, during a stretch of inclement weather in the fall, Lester was seized with a mild form of grip. When he felt the first symptoms he thought that his indisposition would be a matter of short duration, and tried to overcome it by taking a hot bath and a liberal dose of quinine. But the infection was stronger than he counted on; by morning he was flat on his back, with a severe fever and a splitting headache.
  9. (archaic) A small travelling-bag or gripsack.
  10. An apparatus attached to a car for clutching a traction cable.
  11. Assistance; help or encouragement. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  12. A helpful, interesting, admirable, or inspiring person.
  13. (slang) As much as one can hold in a hand; a handful.
  14. (figuratively) A tenacious grasp; a holding fast.
  15. A device for grasping or holding fast to something.
See also
  • (a lot of) hella, hecka
Related terms
  • come to grips
  • get to grips with
  • key grip
  • get a grip
  • gripper
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English grip, grippe, gryppe (a ditch, drain), from Old English grēp (a furrow, burrow) and grēpe (a furrow, ditch, drain), from Proto-Germanic *grōpiz (a furrow, groove). Cognate with Middle Dutch grippe, gruppe (ditch, drain), greppe, German Low German Gruppe (ditch, drain). Related also to Old English grōp (a ditch, drain). More at groop.

Alternative forms

  • gripe

Noun

grip (plural grips)

  1. (dialectal) A small ditch or trench; a channel to carry off water or other liquid; a drain.
Derived terms
  • gripple

Etymology 4

From Middle English gripe, from Old French gripe, from Latin grypus, gryphus.

Noun

grip (plural grips)

  1. (obsolete) The griffin.

Anagrams

  • IGRP, PIRG, prig

Albanian

Etymology

Probably a modern loanword, from German Grippe.

Noun

grip m

  1. flu, influenza

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from French grippe, from Frankish *grīpan (to seize), from Proto-Germanic *grīpaną.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈɡɾip/

Noun

grip f (plural grips)

  1. flu (influenza)

Further reading

  • “grip” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “grip” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “grip” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “grip” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English grip.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣrɪp/

Noun

grip m (plural grippen, diminutive gripje n)

  1. hold (to ensure control)

Related terms

  • greep
  • griep
  • grijpen
  • begrip

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French grippe (influenza).

Noun

grip

  1. influenza, flu

Icelandic

Noun

grip

  1. inflection of gripur:
    1. indefinite accusative singular
    2. indefinite dative singular

Ladino

Etymology

Borrowed from French grippe (influenza).

Noun

grip f (Latin spelling)

  1. (medicine) influenza, flu

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old French gripe.

Noun

grip

  1. Alternative form of gripe (griffin)

Etymology 2

From Old English grēp.

Noun

grip

  1. Alternative form of grippe

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

grip

  1. imperative of gripe

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

grip

  1. present tense of gripa and gripe
  2. imperative of gripa and gripe

Romansch

Noun

grip m (plural grips)

  1. rock

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡriːp/
  • Rhymes: -iːp

Noun

grip c

  1. griffin

Declension

Verb

grip

  1. imperative of gripa.

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from French grippe.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɾip/

Noun

grip (definite accusative gripi, plural gripler)

  1. (pathology) flu, influenza, grippe

Yola

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

grip (plural gripès)

  1. stitch

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

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