grasp vs reach what difference

what is difference between grasp and reach

English

Etymology

From Middle English graspen, grapsen, craspen (to grope; feel around), from Old English *grǣpsian, from Proto-West Germanic *graipisōn, from Proto-Germanic *graipisōną. Cognate with German Low German grapsen (to grab; grasp), Saterland Frisian Grapse (double handful), Old English grāpian (“to touch, feel, grasp”; > Modern English grope). Compare also Swedish krafsa (to scatch; scabble), Norwegian krafse (to scramble).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɡɹɑːsp/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɡɹæsp/
  • Rhymes: -æsp

Verb

grasp (third-person singular simple present grasps, present participle grasping, simple past and past participle grasped)

  1. To grip; to take hold, particularly with the hand.
  2. To understand.
    I have never been able to grasp the concept of infinity.
  3. To take advantage of something, to seize, to jump at a chance.

Synonyms

  • (grip): clasp, grip, hold tight; See also Thesaurus:grasp
  • (understand): comprehend, fathom
  • (take advantage): jump at the chance, jump on

Derived terms

  • begrasp
  • foregrasp
  • grasp the nettle

Related terms

Translations

Noun

grasp (plural grasps)

  1. (sometimes figuratively) Grip.
    • Turning back, then, toward the basement staircase, she began to grope her way through blinding darkness, but had taken only a few uncertain steps when, of a sudden, she stopped short and for a little stood like a stricken thing, quite motionless save that she quaked to her very marrow in the grasp of a great and enervating fear.
  2. Understanding.
    • 1859, George Meredith, The Ordeal of Richard Feverel, Chapter 13:
      There is for the mind but one grasp of happiness: from that uppermost pinnacle of wisdom, whence we see that this world is well designed.
  3. That which is accessible; that which is within one’s reach or ability.

Translations

Anagrams

  • ARPGs, sprag


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹiːt͡ʃ/
  • Rhymes: -iːtʃ
  • Homophone: reech

Etymology 1

From Middle English rechen, from Old English rǣċan (to reach), from Proto-West Germanic *raikijan, from Proto-Germanic *raikijaną, from the Proto-Indo-European *reyǵ- (to bind, reach).

Verb

reach (third-person singular simple present reaches, present participle reaching, simple past and past participle reached or (obsolete) raught)

  1. (intransitive) To extend, stretch, or thrust out (for example a limb or object held in the hand).
  2. (transitive) To give to someone by stretching out a limb, especially the hand; to give with the hand; to pass to another person; to hand over.
  3. (intransitive) To stretch out the hand.
  4. (transitive) To attain or obtain by stretching forth the hand; to extend some part of the body, or something held, so as to touch, strike, grasp, etc.
  5. (transitive) Of a missile: to strike or touch.
  6. (transitive, by extension) To extend an action, effort, or influence to; to penetrate to; to pierce, or cut.
    • 1889, The Kindergarten-Primary Magazine (volume 1, page 119)
      A few words, lovingly, encouragingly spoken failed to reach her heart.
  7. (transitive) To extend to; to stretch out as far as; to touch by virtue of extent.
  8. (transitive) To arrive at (a place) by effort of any kind.
    • 1705-1715, George Cheyne, Philosophical Principles of Religion Natural and Revealed
      the best Accounts of the Appearances of Nature (in any single Instance how minute or simple soever) human Penetration can reach, comes infinitely short of its Reality
  9. (transitive, figuratively) To make contact with.
    Synonyms: contact, get hold of, get in touch
  10. (transitive, figuratively) To connect with (someone) on an emotional level, making them receptive of (one); to get through to (someone).
    What will it take for me to reach him?
  11. (intransitive, India, Singapore) To arrive at a particular destination.
  12. (transitive) To continue living until or up to (a certain age).
  13. (obsolete) To understand; to comprehend.
    • Do what, sir? I reach you not.
  14. To strain after something; to make (sometimes futile or pretentious) efforts.
    • 2015, Janet S. Steinwedel, The Golden Key to Executive Coaching
      Repetitious comments are other examples of introjects that we take on as if they were truths. These include: You’re lazy; you’re selfish; you’ll never amount to anything; you have big dreams; don’t you think you’re reaching a bit; try something more attainable; you were never good in math; you’re not quick on your feet; you’re oblivious to the world around you.
  15. (intransitive) To extend in dimension, time etc.; to stretch out continuously (past, beyond, above, from etc. something).
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus 2010, page 4:
      The Thembu tribe reaches back for twenty generations to King Zwide.
  16. (nautical) To sail on the wind, as from one point of tacking to another, or with the wind nearly abeam.
Usage notes
  • In the past, raught, rought and retcht could be found as past tense forms; these are now obsolete, except perhaps in some dialects.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

reach (plural reaches)

  1. The act of stretching or extending; extension.
  2. The ability to reach or touch with the person, a limb, or something held or thrown.
    The fruit is beyond my reach.
    to be within reach of cannon shot
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter VI
      [] and we have learned not to fire at any of the dinosaurs unless we can keep out of their reach for at least two minutes after hitting them in the brain or spine, or five minutes after puncturing their hearts—it takes them so long to die.
  3. The power of stretching out or extending action, influence, or the like; power of attainment or management; extent of force or capacity.
    • Drawn by others who had deeper reaches than themselves to matters which they least intended.
  4. Extent; stretch; expanse; hence, application; influence; result; scope.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost
      And on the left hand, hell, / With long reach, interposed.
    • 1999, Evan J. Mandery, The Campaign: Rudy Giuliani, Ruth Messenger, Al Sharpton, and the Race to be Mayor of New York City
      While points measure the number of times the average person in a group sees an ad, reach measures the percentage of people in a group that see an ad at least once. Increasing the reach of an ad becomes increasingly expensive as you go along (for the mathematically inclined, it is an exponential function).
  5. (informal) An exaggeration; an extension beyond evidence or normal; a stretch.
    To call George eloquent is certainly a reach.
  6. (boxing) The distance a boxer’s arm can extend to land a blow.
  7. (nautical) Any point of sail in which the wind comes from the side of a vessel, excluding close-hauled.
  8. (nautical) The distance traversed between tacks.
  9. (nautical) A stretch of a watercourse which can be sailed in one reach (in the previous sense). An extended portion of water; a stretch; a straightish portion of a stream, river, or arm of the sea extending up into the land, as from one turn to another. By extension, the adjacent land.
    • the gulfe Iasius, and all the coast thereof is very full of creekes and reaches.
    • The river’s wooded reach.
    • December 2011, Dan Houston, Sailing a classic yacht on the Thames, Classic Boat Magazine
      Close-hauled past flats at Island Gardens opposite the old Royal Naval College at Greenwich we’d been making more than seven knots over the ground and we came close enough to touch the wall. It had felt like roller-blading – long lee-bowed boards down the reaches of this historic river. They have such great names: Bugsby’s Reach, Gallions [Reach], Fiddler’s [Reach] or the evocative Lower Hope [Reach].
  10. A level stretch of a watercourse, as between rapids in a river or locks in a canal. (examples?)
  11. An extended portion or area of land or water.
    • 2002, Russell Allen, “Incantations of the Apprentice”, on Symphony X, The Odyssey.
  12. (obsolete) An article to obtain an advantage.
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, A Discourse of a War with Spain
      The Duke of Parma had particular reaches and ends of his own, under hand, to cross the design.
  13. The pole or rod connecting the rear axle with the forward bolster of a wagon.
Derived terms

reaches

Translations

Etymology 2

Verb

reach (third-person singular simple present reaches, present participle reaching, simple past and past participle reached)

  1. (obsolete or dialect) Alternative form of retch.

Noun

reach (third-person singular simple present reaches, present participle reaching, simple past and past participle reached)

  1. (obsolete or dialect) Alternative form of retch.

Anagrams

  • Arche, acher, arche, chare, chear, rache

Mòcheno

Etymology

From Middle High German rēch, from Old High German rēh, from Proto-West Germanic *raihō, from Proto-Germanic *raihô, *raihą (deer). Cognate with German Reh, English roe.

Noun

reach n

  1. roe deer

References

  • “reach” in Cimbrian, Ladin, Mòcheno: Getting to know 3 peoples. 2015. Servizio minoranze linguistiche locali della Provincia autonoma di Trento, Trento, Italy.

West Frisian

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

reach n (plural reagen, diminutive reachje)

  1. spiderweb

Further reading

  • “reach”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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