grate vs grating what difference

what is difference between grate and grating

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: grāt, IPA(key): /ɡɹeɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt
  • Homophone: great

Etymology 1

From Middle English grate, from a Medieval Latin grāta, from a Latin word for a hurdle; or Italian grata, from Latin cratis.

Noun

grate (plural grates)

  1. a horizontal metal grill through which water, ash, or small objects can fall, while larger objects cannot
  2. a frame or bed, or kind of basket, of iron bars, for holding fuel while burning
Synonyms
  • grill
Translations

Verb

grate (third-person singular simple present grates, present participle grating, simple past and past participle grated)

  1. (transitive) to furnish with grates; to protect with a grating or crossbars

Etymology 2

From Middle English graten, from Old French grater (to scrape) ( > French gratter), from Frankish *krattōn, from Proto-Germanic *krattōną. Cognate with Old High German krazzon ( > German kratzen (to scrawl) > Danish kradse), Icelandic krassa (to scrawl) and Danish kratte.

Verb

grate (third-person singular simple present grates, present participle grating, simple past and past participle grated)

  1. (transitive, cooking) to shred (things, usually foodstuffs), by rubbing across a grater
  2. (intransitive) to make an unpleasant rasping sound, often as the result of rubbing against something
    • 1856, Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary, Part 3 Chapter X, translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling
      The gate suddenly grated. It was Lestiboudois; he came to fetch his spade, that he had forgotten. He recognised Justin climbing over the wall, and at last knew who was the culprit who stole his potatoes.
  3. (by extension, intransitive) to get on one’s nerves; to irritate, annoy
  4. (by extension, transitive) to annoy
    • 2015, Art Levy in Florida Trend, Roland Martin is a Florida ‘Icon’
      one of the issues that’s kind of grating me a little bit is weed control.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Latin grātus (agreeable).

Adjective

grate (comparative more grate, superlative most grate)

  1. (obsolete) serving to gratify; agreeable.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir T. Herbert to this entry?)

Etymology 4

Adjective

grate (comparative more grate, superlative most grate)

  1. Obsolete spelling of great
    • c. 1815, Mary Woody, A true account of Nayomy Wise
      He promisd her a grate reward

References

Anagrams

  • ‘Gater, Gater, Greta, ergat-, great, great-, retag, targe, terga

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡra.te/

Adjective

grate f

  1. feminine plural of grato

Anagrams

  • terga

Latin

Etymology

From grātus (agreeable).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈɡraː.teː/, [ˈɡɾäːt̪eː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈɡra.te/, [ˈɡrɑːt̪ɛ]

Adverb

grātē (comparative grātius, superlative grātissimē)

  1. gladly, willingly
  2. gratefully, thankfully

Related terms

References

  • grate in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • grate in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Yola

Etymology

From Middle English grot.

Noun

grate

  1. a groat

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɹeɪtɪŋ/
    • (General American) IPA(key): [ˈɡɹeɪ̯ɾɪŋ]
    • Homophone: grading
  • Rhymes: -eɪtɪŋ

Adjective

grating

  1. (typically of a voice) Harsh and unpleasant.
  2. Abrasive; tending to annoy.

Translations

Noun

grating (plural gratings)

  1. A barrier that has parallel or crossed bars blocking a passage but admitting air.
  2. A frame of iron bars to hold a fire.
  3. The loose material that comes from something being grated.
    Add a few gratings of nutmeg to the hot milk.
  4. An optical system of close equidistant and parallel lines or bars, especially lines ruled on a polished surface, used for producing spectra by diffraction.
  5. (nautical, in the plural) The strong wooden lattice used to cover a hatch, admitting light and air; also, a movable lattice used for the flooring of boats.
  6. The sound made by something that grates against something else.
    • 1901, Melville Cox Keith, Keith’s Domestic Practice and Botanic Handbook
      If, with these symptoms, are heard gratings of the teeth, irregular appetite, and sudden ebullitions of temper we may reasonably conclude that parasites are irritating the intestines and should be gotten rid of.

Synonyms

  • grill

Related terms

  • grate

Translations

Verb

grating

  1. present participle of grate

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