gravity vs solemnity what difference

what is difference between gravity and solemnity

English

Etymology

16th century, learned borrowing from Latin gravitās (weight) (compare French gravité), from gravis (heavy). Doublet of gravitas.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɹævɪti/
  • Hyphenation: grav‧i‧ty
  • Rhymes: -ævɪti

Noun

gravity (countable and uncountable, plural gravities)

  1. The state or condition of having weight; weight; heaviness.
  2. The state or condition of being grave; seriousness.
  3. (music) The lowness of a note.
  4. (physics) Force on Earth’s surface, of the attraction by the Earth’s masses, and the centrifugal pseudo-force caused by the Earth’s rotation, resulting from gravitation.
  5. (in casual discussion, also) Gravitation, universal force exercised by two bodies onto each other (gravity and gravitation are often used interchangeably).
  6. (physics) Specific gravity.

Synonyms

  • weightfulness
  • The state or condition of being grave: graveness, seriousness

Derived terms

  • anti-gravity
  • centre of gravity
  • gravitation
  • graviton
  • gravity-assist
  • gravity drag
  • gravity turn
  • gravity wave
  • microgravity
  • quantum gravity
  • zero gravity

Translations

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “gravity”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.
  • Gravitation in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)


English

Etymology

solemn +‎ -ity, from Middle English solemnity (observance of formality and ceremony), frequently in the phrases in solemnity, with solemnity, which from Old French solemnite, from Latin sollemnitās, from sollemnis. (Compare solemn.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /səˈlɛmnɪti/
  • Hyphenation: so‧lem‧ni‧ty

Noun

solemnity (countable and uncountable, plural solemnities)

  1. The quality of being deeply serious and sober or solemn.
    the solemnity of a funeral
    • The stateliness and gravity of the Spaniards shows itself in the solemnity of their language.
    • 1754, Jonathan Edwards, An Inquiry into the Modern Prevailing Notions Respecting that Freedom of the Will which is supposed to be Essential to Moral Agency
      These promises were often made with great solemnity and confirmed with an oath.
  2. An instance or example of solemn behavior; a rite or ceremony performed with reverence.
    • April 17, 1707, Francis Atterbury, a sermon
      The forms and solemnities of the last judgment.
  3. (Catholicism) A feast day of the highest rank celebrating a mystery of faith such as the Trinity, an event in the life of Jesus, the Virgin Mary, or another important saint.
  4. (law) A solemn or formal observance; proceeding according to due form; the formality which is necessary to render a thing done valid.
  5. (obsolete) A celebration or festivity.

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • mylonites

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