graze vs rake what difference

what is difference between graze and rake

English

Etymology

From Old English grasian (to feed on grass), from græs (grass).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹeɪz/
  • Homophones: grays, greys
  • Rhymes: -eɪz

Noun

graze (plural grazes)

  1. The act of grazing; a scratching or injuring lightly on passing.
  2. A light abrasion; a slight scratch.
  3. The act of animals feeding from pasture.
    • 1904, Empire Review (volume 6, page 188)
      If it be sundown, when the herds are returning from their daily graze in the long grass of the jungle, clouds of dust will be marking their track along every approach to the village []

Translations

Verb

graze (third-person singular simple present grazes, present participle grazing, simple past and past participle grazed)

  1. (transitive) To feed or supply (cattle, sheep, etc.) with grass; to furnish pasture for.
    • 1731, Jonathan Swift, Considerations upon Two Bills Relating to the Clergy
      a field or two to graze his cows
    • 1999: Although it is perfectly good meadowland, none of the villagers has ever grazed animals on the meadow on the other side of the wall. — Stardust, Neil Gaiman, page 4 (2001 Perennial Edition).
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To feed on; to eat (growing herbage); to eat grass from (a pasture)
    Cattle graze in the meadows.
    • 1993, John Montroll, Origami Inside-Out (page 41)
      The bird [Canada goose] is more often found on land than other waterfowl because of its love for seeds and grains. The long neck is well adapted for grazing.
  3. (transitive) To tend (cattle, etc.) while grazing.
    • 1596-98, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, act I, scene iii:
      Shylock: When Jacob grazed his uncle Laban’s sheep
  4. (intransitive) To eat periodically throughout the day, rather than at fixed mealtimes.
    • 2008, Mohgah Elsheikh, Caroline Murphy, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
      Furthermore, people who take the time to sit down to proper meals find their food more satisfying than people who graze throughout the day. If you skip meals, you will inevitably end up snacking on more high-fat high-sugar foods.
  5. To shoplift by consuming food or drink items before reaching the checkout.
    • 1992, Shoplifting (page 18)
      Grazing refers to customers who consume food items before paying for them, for example, a customer bags one and a half pounds of grapes in the produce department, eats some as she continues her shopping []
    • 2001, Labor Arbitration Information System (volume 2, page 59)
      Had the Grievant attempted to pay for the Mylanta or actually paid for it, then she would not be guilty of grazing or shoplifting.
  6. (transitive) To rub or touch lightly the surface of (a thing) in passing.
    the bullet grazed the wall
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 23
      But in that gale, the port, the land, is that ship’s direst jeopardy; she must fly all hospitality; one touch of land, though it but graze the keel, would make her shudder through and through.
  7. (transitive) To cause a slight wound to; to scratch.
    to graze one’s knee
  8. (intransitive) To yield grass for grazing.

Derived terms

  • Earth-grazing
  • grazing fire
  • overgraze

Translations

Anagrams

  • Garzê, Zager, gazer

Dutch

Verb

graze

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of grazen


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ɹeɪk/
  • Rhymes: -eɪk
  • Homophone: raik

Etymology 1

From Middle English rake [and other forms], from Old English raca, racu, ræce (tool with a row of pointed teeth, rake), from Proto-Germanic *rakō, *rekô (tool with a row of pointed teeth, rake), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵ- (to straighten, right oneself). The English word is cognate with Danish rage (chiefly regional), Middle Dutch rāke, rēke (modern Dutch raak, reek (both regional), riek (pitchfork, rake)), Middle Low German rāke, racke (modern German Low German Raak (rake; poker)), Old High German rehho, rech (Middle High German reche, modern German Rechen (rake)), Old Norse reka (shovel) (modern Icelandic reka (shovel)), Old Saxon recho, Old Swedish raka (modern Swedish raka (rake; (long) straight section of a road)).

Noun

rake (plural rakes)

  1. (agriculture, horticulture) A garden tool with a row of pointed teeth fixed to a long handle, used for collecting debris, grass, etc., for flattening the ground, or for loosening soil; also, a similar wheel-mounted tool drawn by a horse or a tractor.
    Synonym: (horse-drawn rake) horserake
  2. (by extension) A similarly shaped tool used for other purposes.
    1. (gambling) A tool with a straight edge at the end used by a croupier to move chips or money across a gaming table.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

The verb is partly derived:

  • from Middle English raken (to rake; to gather by raking; to rake away (debris); to cover with something; (figurative) to conceal, hide; to destroy) [and other forms], from Old Norse raka (to scrape), from Proto-Germanic *raką, probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵ- (to straighten, right oneself); and
  • from rake (tool with a row of pointed teeth): see etymology 1.

The English word is cognate with Middle Dutch rāken (modern Dutch raken (to rake) (regional)), Middle Low German rāken, Old Danish raghæ, rakæ (modern Danish rage (to shave)), Old Swedish raka (modern Swedish raka (to rake; to shave)).

The noun is derived from the verb.

Verb

rake (third-person singular simple present rakes, present participle raking, simple past and past participle raked)

  1. To act upon with a rake, or as if with a rake.
    1. (transitive, also figuratively) Often followed by in: to gather (things which are apart) together, especially quickly.
    2. (transitive) Often followed by an adverb or preposition such as away, off, out, etc.: to drag or pull in a certain direction.
    3. (transitive, intransitive, figuratively) To claw at; to scrape, to scratch; followed by away: to erase, to obliterate.
    4. (transitive, intransitive, figuratively) Followed by up: to bring up or uncover (something), as embarrassing information, past misdeeds, etc.
    5. (transitive, intransitive, also figuratively) To move (a beam of light, a glance with the eyes, etc.) across (something) with a long side-to-side motion; specifically (often military) to use a weapon to fire at (something) with a side-to-side motion; to spray with gunfire.
    6. (transitive, chiefly Ireland, Northern England, Scotland, also figuratively) To cover (something) by or as if by raking things over it.
Conjugation
Translations

Noun

rake (plural rakes)

  1. The act of raking.
  2. Something that is raked.
    1. A share of profits, takings, etc., especially if obtained illegally; specifically (gambling) the scaled commission fee taken by a cardroom operating a poker game.
    2. (chiefly Ireland, Scotland, slang) A lot, plenty.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English rake, rakke (pass, path, track; type of fencing thrust; pasture land (?)), and then partly:

  • probably from Old English racu (bed of a stream; path; account, narrative; explanation; argument, reasoning; reason) (compare Old English hrace, hraca, hracu (gorge)), from Proto-Germanic *rakō (path, track; course, direction; an unfolding, unwinding; account, narrative; argument, reasoning) [and other forms], from Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵ- (to straighten, right oneself); and
  • from Old Norse rák (strip; stripe; furrow; small mountain ravine), further etymology uncertain but probably ultimately from Proto-Germanic *rakō, as above.

The English word is cognate with Icelandic rák (streak, stripe; notch in a rock; vein in stone or wood), Norwegian råk (channel (in ice); cow path; trail), Norwegian Nynorsk råk (channel (in ice); cow path; trail; furrow; stripe), Swedish råk (crack or channel in ice; river valley), Westrobothnian råk (crack or hole in ice; channel; swath, windrow; hair parting); and probably cognate with Old Danish rag (modern Danish rag (stiff; taut) (regional)), Old Norse rakr (straight), Swedish rak (straight).

Noun

rake (plural rakes)

  1. (Northern England and climbing, also figuratively) A course, a path, especially a narrow and steep path or route up a hillside.
  2. (mining) A fissure or mineral vein of ore traversing the strata vertically, or nearly so.
  3. (Britain, originally Northern England, Scotland) A series, a succession; specifically (rail transport) a set of coupled rail vehicles, normally coaches or wagons.
    Synonym: consist
  4. (systems theory) In cellular automata: a puffer that emits a stream of spaceships rather than a trail of debris.
  5. (Midlands, Northern England) Alternative spelling of raik (a course, a way; pastureland over which animals graze; a journey to transport something between two places; a run; also, the quantity of items so transported)
Translations

Verb

rake (third-person singular simple present rakes, present participle raking, simple past and past participle raked)

  1. Alternative spelling of raik (“(intransitive, Midlands, Northern England, Scotland) to walk; to roam, to wander; of animals (especially sheep): to graze; (transitive, chiefly Scotland) to roam or wander through (somewhere)”)

Etymology 4

The verb is derived from Middle English raken (to go, proceed; to move quickly, hasten, rush; to roam, wander) [and other forms], from Old English racian (to go forward, move, run; to hasten; to take a course or direction; to control, direct, govern, rule), from Proto-Germanic *rakōną (to take a course or direction; to run), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵ- (to straighten; to direct oneself). The English word is cognate with Middle Dutch rāken (to acquire; to hit (not miss); to reach; to touch) (modern Dutch raken (to hit (not miss); to touch; to become)), Middle Low German rāken, rōken (to hit (not miss); to reach; to touch), Old High German rahhōn (to narrate, speak), and probably Swedish raka (to rush off).

The noun is derived from the verb.

Verb

rake (third-person singular simple present rakes, present participle raking, simple past and past participle raked)

  1. (intransitive, chiefly Midlands, Northern England, Scotland) To move swiftly; to proceed rapidly.
  2. (intransitive, falconry) Of a bird of prey: to fly after a quarry; also, to fly away from the falconer, to go wide of the quarry being pursued.

Noun

rake (plural rakes)

  1. (Scotland) Rate of progress; pace, speed.
Alternative forms
  • raik

Etymology 5

The origin of the verb is uncertain, but it may be related to:

  • German ragen (to rise up out of; to jut or stick out), from Middle High German ragen (compare Middle Dutch rāgen, Middle Low German rāgen), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁erǵʰ- (to go up, rise); and
  • possibly to Middle Dutch rāken (to acquire; to hit (not miss); to reach; to touch) (modern Dutch raken (to hit (not miss); to touch; to become)), Middle Low German rāken, rōken (to hit (not miss); to reach; to touch), from Proto-Germanic *rakōną (to take a course or direction; to run) (see further at etymology 4).

The noun is probably derived from the verb.

Verb

rake (third-person singular simple present rakes, present participle raking, simple past and past participle raked)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To incline (something) from a perpendicular direction.
    Synonym: slope
  2. (nautical) Senses relating to watercraft.
    1. (transitive) To provide (the bow or stern of a watercraft) with a rake (a slant that causes it to extend beyond the keel).
    2. (intransitive, rare) Of a watercraft: to have a rake at its bow or stern.
Translations

Noun

rake (plural rakes)

  1. A divergence from the horizontal or perpendicular; a slant, a slope.
  2. (specifically) In full, angle of rake or rake angle: the angle between the edge or face of a tool (especially a cutting tool) and a plane (usually one perpendicular to the object that the tool is being applied to).
  3. (geology) The direction of slip during the movement of a fault, measured within the fault plane.
  4. (nautical) Senses relating to watercraft.
    1. A slant that causes the bow or stern of a watercraft to extend beyond the keel; also, the upper part of the bow or stern that extends beyond the keel.
    2. A slant of some other part of a watercraft (such as a funnel or mast) away from the perpendicular, usually towards the stern.
  5. (roofing) The sloped edge of a roof at or adjacent to the first or last rafter.
Translations

Etymology 6

The noun is a clipping of rakehell ((archaic) lewd or wanton person, debauchee, rake), from to rake (out) hell (“to search through hell thoroughly”), in the sense of a person so evil or immoral that they cannot be found in hell even after an extensive search: see rake (to search through (thoroughly)).

The verb is derived from the noun.

Noun

rake (plural rakes)

  1. A person (usually a man) who is stylish but habituated to hedonistic and immoral conduct.
    Synonym: roué
Translations

Verb

rake (third-person singular simple present rakes, present participle raking, simple past and past participle raked)

  1. (intransitive, dated, rare) To behave as a rake; to lead a hedonistic and immoral life.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:harlotize
    • 1758, William Shenstone, Epilogue to Cleone
      When women hid their necks , and veil’d their faces ,
      Nor romp’d , nor raked , nor stared at public places

Notes

References

Further reading

  • rake (stock character) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • rake (tool) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • rake (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “rake”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.

Anagrams

  • KERA, Kear, Kera, aker, reak

Dutch

Pronunciation

Adjective

rake

  1. Inflected form of raak

Verb

rake

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of raken

Garo

Adverb

rake

  1. hard

Hausa

Etymology

Borrowed from Yoruba ireke.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɽà.kéː/
    • (Standard Kano Hausa) IPA(key): [ɽə̀.céː]

Noun

ràkē m (possessed form ràken)

  1. sugarcane

Norwegian Bokmål

Adjective

rake

  1. definite singular/plural of rak

Norwegian Nynorsk

Adjective

rake

  1. definite singular/plural of rak

Verb

rake (present tense rakar, past tense raka, past participle raka, passive infinitive rakast, present participle rakande, imperative rak)

  1. Alternative form of raka

Scots

Alternative forms

  • raik, rayk

Etymology

From Middle English raken, from Old English racian (to direct; rule; take a course or direction; run).

Verb

rake (third-person singular present rakes, present participle rakin, past rakit, past participle rakit)

  1. To proceed with speed; go; make one’s way
  2. To journey; travel
  3. (of animals) To move across or search for pasture; wander; roam
  4. To stray

Swedish

Adjective

rake

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of rak.

Anagrams

  • ekar, reka

Teop

Verb

rake

  1. to want

References

  • Ulrike Mosel, The Teop sketch grammar

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