graze vs range what difference

what is difference between graze and range

English

Etymology

From Old English grasian (to feed on grass), from græs (grass).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹeɪz/
  • Homophones: grays, greys
  • Rhymes: -eɪz

Noun

graze (plural grazes)

  1. The act of grazing; a scratching or injuring lightly on passing.
  2. A light abrasion; a slight scratch.
  3. The act of animals feeding from pasture.
    • 1904, Empire Review (volume 6, page 188)
      If it be sundown, when the herds are returning from their daily graze in the long grass of the jungle, clouds of dust will be marking their track along every approach to the village []

Translations

Verb

graze (third-person singular simple present grazes, present participle grazing, simple past and past participle grazed)

  1. (transitive) To feed or supply (cattle, sheep, etc.) with grass; to furnish pasture for.
    • 1731, Jonathan Swift, Considerations upon Two Bills Relating to the Clergy
      a field or two to graze his cows
    • 1999: Although it is perfectly good meadowland, none of the villagers has ever grazed animals on the meadow on the other side of the wall. — Stardust, Neil Gaiman, page 4 (2001 Perennial Edition).
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To feed on; to eat (growing herbage); to eat grass from (a pasture)
    Cattle graze in the meadows.
    • 1993, John Montroll, Origami Inside-Out (page 41)
      The bird [Canada goose] is more often found on land than other waterfowl because of its love for seeds and grains. The long neck is well adapted for grazing.
  3. (transitive) To tend (cattle, etc.) while grazing.
    • 1596-98, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, act I, scene iii:
      Shylock: When Jacob grazed his uncle Laban’s sheep
  4. (intransitive) To eat periodically throughout the day, rather than at fixed mealtimes.
    • 2008, Mohgah Elsheikh, Caroline Murphy, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
      Furthermore, people who take the time to sit down to proper meals find their food more satisfying than people who graze throughout the day. If you skip meals, you will inevitably end up snacking on more high-fat high-sugar foods.
  5. To shoplift by consuming food or drink items before reaching the checkout.
    • 1992, Shoplifting (page 18)
      Grazing refers to customers who consume food items before paying for them, for example, a customer bags one and a half pounds of grapes in the produce department, eats some as she continues her shopping []
    • 2001, Labor Arbitration Information System (volume 2, page 59)
      Had the Grievant attempted to pay for the Mylanta or actually paid for it, then she would not be guilty of grazing or shoplifting.
  6. (transitive) To rub or touch lightly the surface of (a thing) in passing.
    the bullet grazed the wall
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 23
      But in that gale, the port, the land, is that ship’s direst jeopardy; she must fly all hospitality; one touch of land, though it but graze the keel, would make her shudder through and through.
  7. (transitive) To cause a slight wound to; to scratch.
    to graze one’s knee
  8. (intransitive) To yield grass for grazing.

Derived terms

  • Earth-grazing
  • grazing fire
  • overgraze

Translations

Anagrams

  • Garzê, Zager, gazer

Dutch

Verb

graze

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of grazen


English

Etymology

From Middle English rengen, from Old French rengier (to range, to rank, to order,), from the noun renc, reng, ranc, rang (a rank, row), from Frankish *hring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz (ring, circle, curve).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹeɪndʒ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪndʒ

Noun

range (plural ranges)

  1. A line or series of mountains, buildings, etc.
  2. A fireplace; a fire or other cooking apparatus; now specifically, a large cooking stove with many hotplates.
  3. Selection, array.
  4. An area for practicing shooting at targets.
  5. An area for military training or equipment testing.
    Synonyms: base, training area, training ground
  6. The distance from a person or sensor to an object, target, emanation, or event.
    Synonyms: distance, radius
  7. Maximum distance of capability (of a weapon, radio, detector, fuel supply, etc.).
  8. An area of open, often unfenced, grazing land.
  9. Extent or space taken in by anything excursive; compass or extent of excursion; reach; scope.
  10. (mathematics) The set of values (points) which a function can obtain.
    Antonym: domain
  11. (statistics) The length of the smallest interval which contains all the data in a sample; the difference between the largest and smallest observations in the sample.
  12. (sports, baseball) The defensive area that a player can cover.
  13. (music) The scale of all the tones a voice or an instrument can produce.
    Synonym: compass
  14. (ecology) The geographical area or zone where a species is normally naturally found.
  15. (programming) A sequential list of values specified by an iterator.
  16. An aggregate of individuals in one rank or degree; an order; a class.
    • 1677, Matthew Hale, The Primitive Origination of Mankind, Considered and Examined According to the Light of Nature
      The next Range of Beings above him are the pure and immaterial Intelligences , the next below him is the sensible Nature.
  17. (obsolete) The step of a ladder; a rung.
  18. (obsolete, Britain, dialect) A bolting sieve to sift meal.
  19. A wandering or roving; a going to and fro; an excursion; a ramble; an expedition.
    • , “Taking Pleasure in Other Men’s Sins”
      He may take a range all the world over.
  20. (US, historical) In the public land system, a row or line of townships lying between two succession meridian lines six miles apart.
  21. The variety of roles that an actor can play in a satisfactory way.

Hyponyms

Holonyms

  • (values a function can obtain): codomain

Coordinate terms

  • (firing range): shooting gallery
  • (radius): azimuth, elevation, inclination
  • (cooking stove): oven

Derived terms

  • open the range
  • very-long-range

Translations

Descendants

  • Japanese: レンジ (​renji)
  • Korean: 레인지 (reinji)

Verb

range (third-person singular simple present ranges, present participle ranging, simple past and past participle ranged)

  1. (intransitive) To travel over (an area, etc); to roam, wander. [from 15th c.]
  2. (transitive) To rove over or through.
    to range the fields
    • 1713, John Gay, Rural Sports
      Teach him to range the ditch, and force the brake.
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To exercise the power of something over something else; to cause to submit to, over. [16th-19th c.]
  4. (transitive) To bring (something) into a specified position or relationship (especially, of opposition) with something else. [from 16th c.]
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 22
      At last we gained such an offing, that the two pilots were needed no longer. The stout sail-boat that had accompanied us began ranging alongside.
  5. (intransitive, mathematics, computing, followed by over) Of a variable, to be able to take any of the values in a specified range.
  6. (transitive) To classify.
    to range plants and animals in genera and species
  7. (intransitive) To form a line or a row.
    The front of a house ranges with the street.
    • 1873, James Thomson (B.V.), The City of Dreadful Night
      The street-lamps burn amid the baleful glooms, / Amidst the soundless solitudes immense / Of ranged mansions dark and still as tombs.
  8. (intransitive) To be placed in order; to be ranked; to admit of arrangement or classification; to rank.
  9. (transitive) To set in a row, or in rows; to place in a regular line or lines, or in ranks; to dispose in the proper order.
    • Maccabeus ranged his army by hands.
  10. (transitive) To place among others in a line, row, or order, as in the ranks of an army; usually, reflexively and figuratively, to espouse a cause, to join a party, etc.
    • 1796, Edmund Burke, a letter to a noble lord
      It would be absurd in me to range myself on the side of the Duke of Bedford and the corresponding society.
  11. (biology) To be native to, or live in, a certain district or region.
  12. To separate into parts; to sift.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)
  13. To sail or pass in a direction parallel to or near.
  14. (baseball) Of a player, to travel a significant distance for a defensive play.
    • 2009, Jason Aronoff, Going, Going … Caught!: Baseball’s Great Outfield Catches as Described by Those Who Saw Them, 1887-1964, page 250, →ISBN
      Willie, playing in left-center, raced toward a ball no human had any business getting a glove to. Mays ranged to his left, searching, digging in, pouring on the speed, as the crowd screamed its anticipation of a triple.

For more quotations using this term, see Citations:range.

Translations

Further reading

  • range in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • range in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • range at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Agner, Negar, Regan, anger, areng, grane, regna, renga

Estonian

Etymology

Allegedly coined ex nihilo by Johannes Aavik in the 20th century.

Adjective

range (genitive range, partitive ranget)

  1. strict

Declension


French

Pronunciation

Verb

range

  1. first-person singular present indicative of ranger
  2. third-person singular present indicative of ranger
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of ranger
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of ranger
  5. second-person singular imperative of ranger

Anagrams

  • nager, régna

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From the adjective rang and vrang.

Noun

range f (definite singular ranga, indefinite plural ranger, definite plural rangene)

  1. the inside of a piece of clothing, but worn inside-out
    Antonym: rette
  2. the trachea, due to it being the wrong pipe, as opposed to the oesophagus, when eating

Verb

range (present tense rangar, past tense ranga, past participle ranga, passive infinitive rangast, present participle rangande, imperative rang)

  1. (transitive) to turn inside-out (e.g. a piece of clothing)

Alternative forms

  • ranga (a-infinitive)

Derived terms

  • range seg inn på ein

Adjective

range

  1. definite singular of rang
  2. plural of rang

References

  • “range” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • ganer, garen, genar, grena, ragen, ragne, regna, renga

Portuguese

Verb

range

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of ranger
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of ranger

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