grease vs stain what difference

what is difference between grease and stain

English

Etymology

From Middle English grece (grease), from Anglo-Norman grece, from Old French graisse, from Vulgar Latin *grassia, from Latin crassus (fat, thick). Doublet of crass.

Pronunciation

Noun
  • (General American) enPR: grēs, IPA(key): /ɡɹis/
  • (UK) enPR: grēs, IPA(key): /ɡɹiːs/
  • Rhymes: -iːs
  • Homophone: Greece
Verb
  • (UK) enPR: grēs, IPA(key): /ɡɹiːs/
  • (General American) enPR: grēs, grēz, IPA(key): /ɡɹis/, /ɡɹiz/
  • Rhymes: -iːs (UK, US)
  • Rhymes: -iːz (US)

Noun

grease (countable and uncountable, plural greases)

  1. Animal fat in a melted or soft state
  2. (by extension) Any oily or fatty matter.
  3. Shorn but not yet cleansed wool
  4. Inflammation of a horse’s heels, also known as scratches or pastern dermatitis.
  5. (slang) Bribe money.
    • 1982, Stephen King, Survivor Type
      Some of the people I talked to said it could be done—but it would cost big money. More grease than I’d ever dreamed of.

Synonyms

  • (animal fat): fat, lard

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

grease (third-person singular simple present greases, present participle greasing, simple past and past participle greased)

  1. (transitive) To put grease or fat on something, especially in order to lubricate.
  2. (transitive, informal) To bribe.
    • the greas’d advocate that grinds the poor
  3. (transitive, informal) To cause to go easily; to facilitate.
  4. (transitive, slang, aviation) To perform a landing extraordinarily smoothly.
  5. (transitive, slang) To kill, murder.
  6. (obsolete) To cheat or cozen; to overreach.
    • You have greased him
      For chewing love again in haste
  7. To affect (a horse) with grease, the disease.

Synonyms

  • (put grease or fat on): lard
  • (slang for kill or murder): bump off, hit, whack

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Eagers, Saeger, Seager, aegers, agrees, eagers, eagres, geares, searge, ægers


English

Etymology

From Middle English steinen, steynen (to stain, colour, paint), of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse steina (to stain, colour, paint), from steinn (stone, mineral blue, colour, stain), from Proto-Norse ᛊᛏᚨᛁᚾᚨᛉ (stainaz), from Proto-Germanic *stainaz (stone), from Proto-Indo-European *steyh₂- (to stiffen). Cognate with Old English stān (stone). More at stone.

Replaced native Middle English wem (spot, blemish, stain) from Old English wem (spot, stain).

In some senses, influenced by unrelated Middle English disteynen (to discolor, remove the colour from”; literally, “de-colour), from Anglo-Norman desteindre (to remove the colour from, bleach), from Old French destaindre (to remove the color from, bleach), from des- (dis-, de-, un-) + teindre (to dye), from Latin tingo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /steɪn/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn

Noun

stain (plural stains)

  1. A discoloured spot or area.
  2. A blemish on one’s character or reputation.
  3. A substance used to soak into a surface and colour it.
  4. A reagent or dye used to stain microscope specimens so as to make some structures visible.
  5. (heraldry) Any of a number of non-standard tinctures used in modern heraldry.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

stain (third-person singular simple present stains, present participle staining, simple past and past participle stained)

  1. (transitive) To discolour.
    to stain the hand with dye
    armour stained with blood
  2. To taint or tarnish someone’s character or reputation
  3. To coat a surface with a stain
    to stain wood with acids, coloured washes, paint rubbed in, etc.
    the stained glass used for church windows
  4. (intransitive) To become stained; to take a stain.
  5. (transitive, cytology) To treat (a microscopic specimen) with a dye, especially one that dyes specific features
  6. To cause to seem inferior or soiled by comparison.
    • She stains the ripest virgins of her age.
    • c. 1591-1592, Edmund Spenser, Daphnaïda. An Elegy upon the Death of the Noble and Vertuous Douglas Howard, Daughter and Heire of Henry Lord Howard, Viscount Byndon, and Wife of Arthure Gorges Esquier
      that did all other beasts in beauty stain

Translations

Anagrams

  • Astin, Insta, Saint, Santi, Sinta, Tanis, Tians, antis, insta-, saint, sat in, satin, stian, tians, tisan

Gothic

Romanization

stain

  1. Romanization of ????????????????????

Gutnish

Etymology

From Old Norse steinn (stone), from Proto-Norse ᛊᛏᚨᛁᚾᚨᛉ (stainaz), from Proto-Germanic *stainaz (stone). Cognate with English stone, German Stein, Dutch steen, Danish sten, Norwegian Bokmål sten, Norwegian Nynorsk stein, Swedish sten, Faroese steinur, West Frisian stien, Low German Steen. Ultimately from Pre-Germanic *stoyh₂nos, o-grade from Proto-Indo-European *steyh₂- (to stiffen).

Noun

stain m

  1. stone, rock, as material or individual piece of rock or pebble

Middle English

Adjective

stain

  1. Alternative form of stonen

Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse steinn (stone), from Proto-Norse ᛊᛏᚨᛁᚾᚨᛉ (stainaz), from Proto-Germanic *stainaz (stone). Cognate with English stone, German Stein, Dutch steen, Danish sten, Norwegian Bokmål sten, Norwegian Nynorsk stein, Swedish sten, Faroese steinur, West Frisian stien, Low German Steen. Ultimately from Pre-Germanic *stoyh₂nos, o-grade from Proto-Indo-European *steyh₂- (to stiffen).

Noun

stain m

  1. stone, rock, as material or individual piece of rock or pebble

Alternative forms

  • stäin
  • stejn

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