greasy vs sebaceous what difference

what is difference between greasy and sebaceous

English

Etymology

From Middle English gresi, gressy, equivalent to grease +‎ -y.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡɹi.si/, (especially Southern U.S.) /ˈɡɹi.zi/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɡɹiː.si/
  • Rhymes: -iːsi, -iːzi

Adjective

greasy (comparative greasier, superlative greasiest)

  1. Having a slippery surface; having a surface covered with grease.
    a greasy mineral
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, Act V, Scene 2,[1]
      [] mechanic slaves
      With greasy aprons, rules, and hammers, shall
      Uplift us to the view []
    • 1961, V. S. Naipaul, A House for Mr Biswas, London: André Deutsch, Part One, Chapter 2, p. 54,[2]
      it was in the garage that Alec worked, [] doing mysterious greasy things. Grease blackened his hairy legs; grease had turned his white canvas shoes black; grease blackened his hands even beyond the wrist; grease made his short working trousers black and stiff. Yet he had the gift, which Mr Biswas admired, of being able to hold a cigarette between greasy fingers and greasy lips without staining it.
  2. Containing a lot of grease or fat.
    • c. 1795, Margaret Taylor, Mrs. Taylor’s Family Companion: or The Whole Art of Cookery Display’d, London: W. Lane, “To fry flat Fish,” p. 37,[3]
      Before you dish them up, lay them upon a drainer before the fire sloping, for two or three minutes, which will prevent their eating greasy.
  3. (slang) shady, sketchy, dodgy, detestable, unethical.
  4. (obsolete) fat, bulky
    • c. 1600, William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Act II, Scene 1,[6]
      Let’s consult together against this greasy knight.
  5. (obsolete) gross; indelicate; indecent
    • 1601, John Marston, Jack Drum’s Entertainment, London: Richard Olive, Act I,[7]
      Now I am perfect hate, I lou’d but three things in the world, Philosophy, Thrift, and my self. Thou hast made me hate Philosophy. A Vsurers greasie Codpeece made me loath Thrift: but if all the Brewers Iades in the town can drug me from loue of my selfe, they shall doo more then e’re the seuen wise men of Greece could []
  6. (of a horse) Afflicted with the disease called grease.

Derived terms

  • greasily
  • greasiness
  • greasy pole
  • greasy spoon
  • nongreasy
  • ungreasy

Translations

Anagrams

  • Gareys, Gearys, Yagers, gayers, gyrase, re-gays, yagers


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin sebaceus, from Latin sebum, from Proto-Indo-European *seyb- (to pour out), which Proto-Germanic *saipǭ (“soap”) is also derived from.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -eɪʃəs

Adjective

sebaceous (not comparable)

  1. of or relating to fat, sebum
  2. oozing fat
  3. (botany) tallowy, waxy
    a sebaceous plant secretion

Derived terms

  • keratosebaceous
  • sebaceous follicle
  • sebaceous gland

Related terms

  • sebacic acid
  • sebum

Translations


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