great vs hot what difference

what is difference between great and hot

English

Etymology

From Middle English greet (great, large), from Old English grēat (big, thick, coarse, massive), from Proto-Germanic *grautaz (big in size, coarse, coarse grained), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrewd-, *gʰer- (to rub, grind, remove). Cognate with Scots great (coarse in grain or texture, thick, great), West Frisian grut (large, great), Dutch groot (large, stour), German groß (large), Old English grēot (earth, sand, grit). Related to grit.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: grāt, IPA(key): /ɡɹeɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt
  • Homophone: grate

Adjective

great (comparative greater, superlative greatest)

  1. Relatively large in scale, size, extent, number (i.e. having many parts or members) or duration (i.e. relatively long); very big.
  2. Of larger size or more importance than others of its kind.
    • So the King made Daniel a great man […]
  3. (qualifying nouns of family relationship) Involving more generations than the qualified word implies — as many extra generations as repetitions of the word great (from 1510s). [see Derived terms]
  4. (obsolete, postpositive, followed by ‘with’) Pregnant; large with young; full of.
    • the ewes great with young
  5. (obsolete, except with ‘friend’ and similar words such as ‘mate’,’buddy’) Intimate; familiar.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Followers and Friends
      those that are so great with him
  6. Extreme or more than usual.
  7. Of significant importance or consequence; important.
  8. (applied to actions, thoughts and feelings) Arising from or possessing idealism; admirable; superior; commanding; heroic; illustrious; eminent.
  9. Impressive or striking.
  10. Much in use; favoured.
  11. (applied to persons) Endowed with extraordinary powers; of exceptional talents or achievements; uncommonly gifted; able to accomplish vast results; remarkable; strong; powerful; mighty; noble.
  12. Title referring to an important leader.
  13. Doing or exemplifying (a characteristic or pursuit) on a large scale; active or enthusiastic.
  14. (often followed by ‘at’) Skilful or adroit.
  15. (informal) Very good; excellent; wonderful; fantastic. [from 1848]
  16. (informal, Britain) Intensifying a word or expression, used in mild oaths.

Usage notes

Moderating adverbs such as fairly, somewhat, etc. tend not to be used with great. Some intensifiers can be used with some senses of great; for example, a very great amount, a very great man, the party was really great, though not *the party was very great.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:large
  • See also Thesaurus:excellent
  • gr8, grt (Internet slang, text messaging)

Antonyms

  • (very big, large scale): tiny
  • (uncommonly gifted): mediocre, ordinary

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Welsh: grêt

Translations

Interjection

great

  1. Expression of gladness and content about something.
    Great! Thanks for the wonderful work.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      I am in my new apartment! Great!

  2. sarcastic inversion thereof.
    Oh, great! I just dumped all 500 sheets of the manuscript all over and now I have to put them back in order.

Translations

Noun

great (plural greats)

  1. A person of major significance, accomplishment or acclaim.
    Newton and Einstein are two of the greats of the history of science.
    • 2019, Daniel Taylor, Lionel Messi magic puts Barcelona in command of semi-final with Liverpool (in The Guardian, 1 May 2019)[3]
      Sadio Mané wasted a glorious chance in the first half and, late on, Mohamed Salah turned his shot against a post after a goal-line clearance had spun his way. That, in a nutshell, perhaps sums up the difference between Messi and the players on the next rung below – the ones who can be described as great footballers without necessarily being football greats.
  2. (music) The main division in a pipe organ, usually the loudest division.
  3. (in combinations such as “two-greats”, “three-greats” etc.) An instance of the word “great” signifying an additional generation in phrases expressing family relationships.
    My three-greats grandmother.

Antonyms

  • (person of major significance, accomplishment or acclaim): mediocre

Translations

Adverb

great (not comparable)

  1. (informal) Very well (in a very satisfactory manner).
    Those mechanical colored pencils work great because they don’t have to be sharpened.

Translations

Anagrams

  • ‘Gater, Gater, Greta, ergat-, grate, retag, targe, terga

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *grautaz (big in size, coarse, coarse grained), from Proto-Indo-European *ghrewə- (to fell, put down, fall in). Cognate with Old Saxon grōt (large, thick, coarse, stour), Old High German grōz (large, thick, coarse), Old English grot (particle). More at groat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡræ͜ɑːt/

Adjective

grēat

  1. great, massive
  2. tall
  3. thick; stout
  4. coarse

Declension

Derived terms

  • grēatnes

Descendants

  • Middle English: greet, grete
    • English: great, (dialectal) gert
      • Welsh: grêt
    • Scots: great, greet, grete, greit

Scots

Alternative forms

  • greet, grete, greit

Etymology

From Old English grēat, from Proto-Germanic *grautaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɡrɛt], [ɡrɪt]
  • (North Northern Scots) IPA(key): [ɡrit]

Adjective

great (comparative greater, superlative greatest)

  1. great
  2. coarse (in grain or texture)
  3. (of things) thick, bulky, roomy
  4. (of people) big, stout
  5. (of a river) swollen with rain, in flood
  6. (of the sea) high, stormy
  7. intimate, friendly


English

Alternative forms

  • (physically attractive): hawt (slang, especially Internet), hott (slang, especially Internet)

Etymology

From Middle English hot, hat, from Old English hāt (hot, fervent, fervid, fierce), from Proto-Germanic *haitaz (hot), from Proto-Indo-European *kay- (hot; to heat). Cognate with Scots hate, hait (hot), North Frisian hiet (hot), Saterland Frisian heet (hot), West Frisian hjit (hot), Dutch heet (hot), Low German het (hot), German Low German heet (hot), German heiß (hot), Danish hed (hot), Swedish het (hot), Icelandic heitur (hot).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: hŏt, IPA(key): /hɒt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt
  • (General American) enPR: hät, IPA(key): /hɑt/

Adjective

hot (comparative hotter, superlative hottest)

  1. (of an object) Having a high temperature.
    • There was also hairdressing: hairdressing, too, really was hairdressing in those times — no running a comb through it and that was that. It was curled, frizzed, waved, put in curlers overnight, waved with hot tongs; [].
  2. (of the weather) Causing the air to be hot.
  3. (of a person or animal) Feeling the sensation of heat, especially to the point of discomfort.
  4. (of a temper) Easily provoked to anger.
  5. Feverish.
  6. (of food) Spicy, pungent, piquant, as some chilis and other spices are.
  7. (informal) Very good, remarkable, exciting. [from the 19thc.]
  8. Stolen. [from the 20thc.]
  9. (not comparable) Electrically charged.
  10. (informal) Radioactive. [from the 20thc.]
  11. (slang, of a person) Very physically and/or sexually attractive.
  12. (slang) Sexual or sexy; involving sexual intercourse or sexual excitement.
  13. (slang) Sexually aroused; randy.
  14. (slang, with for) Attracted to.
  15. Popular; in demand.
  16. Of great current interest; provoking current debate or controversy.
    a hot topic
  17. Very close to finding or guessing something to be found or guessed.
  18. Performing strongly; having repeated successes.
    • 1938, Harold M. Sherman, “Shooting Stars,” Boys’ Life (March 1938), Published by Boy Scouts of America, p.5:
      “Keep going! You’re hot tonight!” urged Wally.
    • 2002, Peter Krause & Andy King, Play-By-Play Golf, First Avenue Editions, p.55:
      The ball lands on the fairway, just a couple of yards in front of the green. “Nice shot Sarah! You’re hot today!” Jenny says.
  19. Fresh; just released.
    • 1960, Super Markets of the Sixties: Findings, recommendations.- v.2. The plans and sketches, Super Market Institute, p.30:
      A kid can stand in the street and sell newspapers, if the headlines are hot.
    • 2000, David Cressy, Travesties and transgressions in Tudor and Stuart England: tales of discord and dissension, Oxford University Press, p.34:
      Some of these publications show signs of hasty production, indicating that they were written while the news was hot.
  20. Uncomfortable, difficult to deal with; awkward, dangerous, unpleasant.
  21. (slang) Used to emphasize the short duration or small quantity of something
  22. (slang) Characterized by police presence or activity.
  23. (slang, of a draft/check) Not covered by funds on account.
  24. (of ammunition) This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Quotations

  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:hot.

Synonyms

  • (having a high temperature): heated; see also Thesaurus:hot
  • (of the weather): baking, boiling, boiling hot, sultry, sweltering
  • (feeling the sensation of heat): baking, boiling, boiling hot
  • (feverish): feverish, having a temperature
  • (spicy): piquant, spicy, tangy
  • (slang: stolen): stolen
  • (electrically charged): live
  • (radioactive): radioactive
  • (slang: physically or sexually attractive): attractive, beautiful, cute, fit, foxy, gorgeous, handsome, hunky, lush, pretty, sexy, studly, tasty, yummy
  • (of a draft/check): rubber, bad

Antonyms

  • (having a high temperature): chilled, chilly, cold, cold as ice, freezing, freezing cold, frigid, glacial, ice-cold, icy
  • (of the weather): cold, freezing, freezing cold, icy
  • (feeling the sensation of heat): freezing, freezing cold
  • (spicy): bland, mild
  • (electrically charged): neutral, dead
  • (slang): lifeless

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

hot (third-person singular simple present hots, present participle hotting, simple past and past participle hotted)

  1. (with up) To heat; to make or become hot.
  2. (with up) To become lively or exciting.
    • 2018 “Clean Slate”, Wentworth
      Turf war’s hotting up.

Synonyms

  • hot up; heat, heat up

Anagrams

  • -oth, OTH, o’th’, oth, tho, tho’, thô

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɦɔt/
  • Hyphenation: hot
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Etymology 1

Unknown.

Adjective

hot (comparative hoter, superlative hotst)

  1. (nautical) right, on the right side
    Synonym: rechts
Derived terms
  • van hot naar her
See also
  • stuurboord

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English hot.

Adjective

hot (comparative hotter, superlative hotst)

  1. (informal) hot, popular
  2. (informal) hot, sexy, attractive
Inflection

Ingrian

Etymology

Borrowed from Russian хоть (xotʹ).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhot/

Conjunction

hot

  1. though

Particle

hot

  1. Used to make a pronoun, adverb or determiner indefinite

References

  • Vitalij Chernyavskij (2005) Ižoran keel (Ittseopastaja)[2]

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • hoth, whote
  • hate, hatte (northern)

Etymology

From Old English hāt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɔːt/, /hɔt/

Adjective

hot

  1. hot

Noun

hot (uncountable)

  1. hotness

Descendants

  • English: hot
  • Scots: hat, hait, hate
  • Yola: hoat, hote

References

  • “hō̆t, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  • “hō̆t, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Pennsylvania German

Verb

hot

  1. third-person singular present indicative of hawwe

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxot/, [ˈxot̪]

Adjective

hot (plural hot or hots)

  1. hot; sexy

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish hōt n, from Old Norse hót n pl, from Proto-Germanic *hwōtō (threat), cognate with Gothic ???????????????? f (ƕōta). Related to *hwētaną (to attack, stab).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /huːt/

Noun

hot n

  1. a threat

Declension

Related terms

  • bombhot
  • hota
  • hotbild
  • hotbrev
  • hotfull
  • hotande
  • mordhot
  • terrorhot

Westrobothnian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /huːt/, [hɯ́ᵝːt]
    Rhymes: -úːt

Etymology 1

Compare Icelandic hót, contraction of Old Norse hvat.

Noun

hot m

  1. A whit, a bit.
    n litn hot

    a little bit, a little piece

Etymology 2

Ablaut of Icelandic hvata (to sting, jab,) dialectal Norwegian hvæta (to jab,) and related to gwätt, wäti.

Noun

hot n (nominative & accusative definite singular hote)

  1. A sting, pang.
    ja hav söm e hot ått brösten

    I feel a sting in my chest.

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