green vs greens what difference

what is difference between green and greens

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, General Australian) enPR: grēn, IPA(key): /ɡɹiːn/
  • (US, Canada) enPR: grēn, IPA(key): /ɡɹin/
  • Rhymes: -iːn

Etymology 1

From Middle English grene, from Old English grēne, from Proto-West Germanic *grōnī, from Proto-Germanic *grōniz (compare North Frisian green, West Frisian grien, Dutch groen, Low German grön, green, greun, German grün, Danish and Norwegian Nynorsk grøn, Swedish grön, Norwegian Bokmål grønn, Icelandic grænn), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰreh₁- (to grow). More at grow.

Adjective

green (comparative greener, superlative greenest)

  1. Having green as its color.
    Synonyms: verdant, vert
  2. (figuratively, of people) Sickly, unwell.
  3. Unripe, said of certain fruits that change color when they ripen.
  4. (figuratively) Inexperienced.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:inexperienced
    • 2008, Richard R. Rust, Renegade Champion: The Unlikely Rise of Fitzrada (page 91)
      He acted like a green racehorse, plunging over his jumps, tearing to the front of the field of riders.
  5. (figuratively, of people) Naive or unaware of obvious facts.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:gullible
  6. (figuratively, of people) Overcome with envy.
  7. (figuratively) Environmentally friendly.
    Synonym: eco-friendly
  8. (cricket) Describing a pitch which, even if there is no visible grass, still contains a significant amount of moisture.
  9. (dated) Of bacon or similar smallgoods: unprocessed, raw, unsmoked; not smoked or spiced.
    Synonyms: raw, unprocessed, unsmoked
  10. (dated) Not fully roasted; half raw.
    • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick, or The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry After Truth With a Variety of Rules to Guard
      We say the meat is green when half roasted.
  11. (film, television, historical) Of film: freshly processed by the laboratory and not yet fully physically hardened.
    • 1947, Theatre Catalog (volume 5, page 570)
      Following initial drying of film in a motion picture laboratory (after treatment in a hardening-fixing bath) the gelatin structure of an emulsion contracts and is permanently changed. The hardening action still continues for a time as a further small amount of residual moisture is given up. While traces of excess moisture remain, the emulsion is “green,” relatively soft, []
    • 1961, American Cinematographer (volume 42, page 618)
      [] attaching pre-photographed and pre-printed footage of a focusing chart to daily film footage without taking into consideration that such film may be worn or dried out and therefore, in its plane of best focus, would not be identical to that of the green film of the daily rushes.
  12. Of freshly cut wood or lumber that has not been dried: containing moisture and therefore relatively more flexible or springy.
  13. (wine) High or too high in acidity.
    Synonym: tart
  14. Full of life and vigour; fresh and vigorous; new; recent.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:new
    • 1790, Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France
      as valid against such an old and beneficent government as against [] the greenest usurpation
  15. (Philippines) Having a sexual connotation.
  16. (particle physics) Having a color charge of green.
  17. Being or relating to the green currencies of the European Union.
Antonyms
  • (having green as its colour): nongreen, ungreen
  • (having green as its colour charge): antigreen
  • (of bacon: unprocessed): processed, smoked, spiced
  • (of wine: high in acidity): cloy, sweet
  • (of certain fruits: ready to be eaten): ripe
Derived terms

Pages starting with “green”.

Related terms
Translations

See green/translations § Adjective.

References

Etymology 2

From Middle English grene, from the adjective (see above).

Noun

green (plural greens)

  1. The colour of growing foliage, as well as other plant cells containing chlorophyll; the colour between yellow and blue in the visible spectrum; one of the primary additive colour for transmitted light; the colour obtained by subtracting red and blue from white light using cyan and yellow filters.
  2. (politics, sometimes capitalised) A member of a green party; an environmentalist.
    Synonyms: environmentalist, (Australian) greenie, tree hugger, treehugger
    Hyponyms: blue green, red green
  3. (golf) A putting green, the part of a golf course near the hole.
  4. (bowls) The surface upon which bowls is played.
    Synonym: bowling green
  5. (snooker) One of the colour balls used in snooker, with a value of 3 points.
  6. (Britain) a public patch of land in the middle of a settlement.
  7. A grassy plain; a piece of ground covered with verdant herbage.
  8. (chiefly in the plural) Fresh leaves or branches of trees or other plants; wreaths.
  9. Any substance or pigment of a green colour.
  10. A green light used as a signal.
    • 1992, “How to Avoid the Most Embarrassing of Pilot Errors”, in Flying Magazine (volume 119, number 6, page 94)
      To the casual cockpit observer, landing-gear operation appears to be one of the most elementary tasks we have to perform. Either the switch is up and the lights are out, or it’s down and there are three greens.
  11. (Britain, slang, uncountable) marijuana.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:marijuana
  12. (US, slang, uncountable) Money.
  13. (particle physics) One of the three color charges for quarks.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

See green/translations § Noun.

Etymology 3

From Middle English grenen, from Old English grēnian (to become green, flourish), from Proto-Germanic *grōnijōną, *grōnijaną (to become green), from the adjective (see above). Cognate with Saterland Frisian gräinje, German Low German grönen, German grünen, Swedish gröna, Icelandic gróna.

Verb

green (third-person singular simple present greens, present participle greening, simple past and past participle greened)

  1. (transitive) To make (something) green, to turn (something) green.
    • Great spring before greened all the year.
  2. To become or grow green in colour.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, The Ancient Sage
      Her dust is greening in your leaf
    • 1886, John Greenleaf Whittier, “Flowers in Winter”
      by greening slope and singing flood
  3. (transitive) To add greenspaces to (a town, etc.).
    • 2000, AIA Guide to New York City (page 58)
      The newer 39-story, 1.5-million-square-foot tower occupies much of the original Shearson Garden, a larger parklet that briefly greened the construction site to be, and is remembered fondly by nearby Tribecans.
  4. (intransitive) To become environmentally aware.
  5. (transitive) To make (something) environmentally friendly.
Synonyms
  • (make (something) green): engreen
Derived terms
Translations

See green/translations § Verb.

See also

  • Appendix:Colors
  • Anagrams

    • Egner, Geren, genre, neger, regen

    Czech

    Etymology

    From English green.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): [ˈɡriːn]

    Noun

    green m

    1. (slang, golf) green (a putting green; the part of a golf course near the hole)

    Usage notes

    Although the official term for the green is jamkoviště, it is rarely used in practice. Instead, unofficial Czech versions of the English word green, variously spelled green, grýn, and grín, are used in practice.

    Declension

    References


    Danish

    Etymology

    From English green.

    Noun

    green c (definite singular greenen, indefinite plural greens, definite plural greenene)

    1. (golf) a green, putting green (the closely mown area surrounding each hole on a golf course)

    Further reading

    • “green” in Den Danske Ordbog

    Dutch

    Etymology 1

    Borrowed from North Germanic, from Old Norse grǫn.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ɣreːn/
    • Hyphenation: green
    • Rhymes: -eːn

    Noun

    green m (plural grenen)

    1. (obsolete) Scots pine, Pinus sylvestris
      Synonym: grove den
    Derived terms
    • grenen
    • grenenhout

    Etymology 2

    Borrowed from English green.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ɡriːn/
    • Hyphenation: green
    • Rhymes: -iːn

    Noun

    green m (plural greens)

    1. (golf) green, putting green

    German Low German

    Alternative forms

    • gren
    • (in some other dialects) gröön (grön)
    • (in some other dialects) gräun

    Adjective

    green

    1. (Low Prussian) green

    Middle English

    Alternative forms

    • gre, gree

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Old French greer; equivalent to gre +‎ -en (infinitival suffix).

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ˈɡreːən/

    Verb

    green (Late Middle English)

    1. To come to an understanding or agreement.
    2. (rare) To make a compact of reconciliation.

    Conjugation

    Descendants

    • English: gree (obsolete)
    • Scots: gree

    References

    • “grẹ̄en, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-09-15.

    North Frisian

    Etymology

    From Old Frisian grēne, from Proto-West Germanic *grōnī, from Proto-Germanic *grōniz.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ɡreːn/

    Adjective

    green

    1. (Föhr-Amrum, Sylt) green

    Norwegian Bokmål

    Noun

    green m (definite singular greenen, indefinite plural greener, definite plural greenene)

    1. (golf) a green, putting green (the closely mown area surrounding each hole on a golf course)

    Norwegian Nynorsk

    Noun

    green m (definite singular greenen, indefinite plural greenar, definite plural greenane)

    1. (golf) a green or putting green (the closely mown area surrounding each hole on a golf course)

    Swedish

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ɡriːn/
    • Rhymes: -iːn

    Noun

    green c

    1. (golf) a green, putting green (the closely mown area around a hole on a golf course)

    Declension

    Anagrams

    • gener, genre, neger


    English

    Pronunciation

    • enPR: grēnz, IPA(key): /ɡɹiːnz/
    • Rhymes: -iːnz

    Etymology 1

    From Middle English grenes, equivalent to green +‎ -s. Compare Saterland Frisian Gräinieten (vegetable), West Frisian grienten (vegetables, greens), Dutch groenten (vegetables, greens), German Low German Gröönten (vegetables, greens), Danish grøntsager (vegetables), Swedish grönsaker (vegetables).

    Noun

    greens pl (plural only)

    1. Leaves and leaf-like parts of edible plants when eaten as vegetables or in salads.
    2. Green vegetables; edible plants or plant parts that contain chlorophyll.
    3. Leafy plants that are used for decoration.
    4. The green uniform of the United States Marine Corps.
      • 1991, The Leatherneck (volume 74)
        Some years ago, moths ruined my greens, and my son, a career Army man, sensed my loss.
    Derived terms
    Translations

    Noun

    greens

    1. plural of green

    Etymology 2

    From green (verb).

    Verb

    greens

    1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of green

    References

    • greens on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

    Anagrams

    • Egners, Gerens, Senger, genres, negers, regens

    Danish

    Noun

    greens c

    1. indefinite plural of green

    Dutch

    Pronunciation

    Noun

    greens

    1. plural of green

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