green vs jet what difference

what is difference between green and jet

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, General Australian) enPR: grēn, IPA(key): /ɡɹiːn/
  • (US, Canada) enPR: grēn, IPA(key): /ɡɹin/
  • Rhymes: -iːn

Etymology 1

From Middle English grene, from Old English grēne, from Proto-West Germanic *grōnī, from Proto-Germanic *grōniz (compare North Frisian green, West Frisian grien, Dutch groen, Low German grön, green, greun, German grün, Danish and Norwegian Nynorsk grøn, Swedish grön, Norwegian Bokmål grønn, Icelandic grænn), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰreh₁- (to grow). More at grow.

Adjective

green (comparative greener, superlative greenest)

  1. Having green as its color.
    Synonyms: verdant, vert
  2. (figuratively, of people) Sickly, unwell.
  3. Unripe, said of certain fruits that change color when they ripen.
  4. (figuratively) Inexperienced.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:inexperienced
    • 2008, Richard R. Rust, Renegade Champion: The Unlikely Rise of Fitzrada (page 91)
      He acted like a green racehorse, plunging over his jumps, tearing to the front of the field of riders.
  5. (figuratively, of people) Naive or unaware of obvious facts.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:gullible
  6. (figuratively, of people) Overcome with envy.
  7. (figuratively) Environmentally friendly.
    Synonym: eco-friendly
  8. (cricket) Describing a pitch which, even if there is no visible grass, still contains a significant amount of moisture.
  9. (dated) Of bacon or similar smallgoods: unprocessed, raw, unsmoked; not smoked or spiced.
    Synonyms: raw, unprocessed, unsmoked
  10. (dated) Not fully roasted; half raw.
    • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick, or The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry After Truth With a Variety of Rules to Guard
      We say the meat is green when half roasted.
  11. (film, television, historical) Of film: freshly processed by the laboratory and not yet fully physically hardened.
    • 1947, Theatre Catalog (volume 5, page 570)
      Following initial drying of film in a motion picture laboratory (after treatment in a hardening-fixing bath) the gelatin structure of an emulsion contracts and is permanently changed. The hardening action still continues for a time as a further small amount of residual moisture is given up. While traces of excess moisture remain, the emulsion is “green,” relatively soft, []
    • 1961, American Cinematographer (volume 42, page 618)
      [] attaching pre-photographed and pre-printed footage of a focusing chart to daily film footage without taking into consideration that such film may be worn or dried out and therefore, in its plane of best focus, would not be identical to that of the green film of the daily rushes.
  12. Of freshly cut wood or lumber that has not been dried: containing moisture and therefore relatively more flexible or springy.
  13. (wine) High or too high in acidity.
    Synonym: tart
  14. Full of life and vigour; fresh and vigorous; new; recent.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:new
    • 1790, Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France
      as valid against such an old and beneficent government as against [] the greenest usurpation
  15. (Philippines) Having a sexual connotation.
  16. (particle physics) Having a color charge of green.
  17. Being or relating to the green currencies of the European Union.
Antonyms
  • (having green as its colour): nongreen, ungreen
  • (having green as its colour charge): antigreen
  • (of bacon: unprocessed): processed, smoked, spiced
  • (of wine: high in acidity): cloy, sweet
  • (of certain fruits: ready to be eaten): ripe
Derived terms

Pages starting with “green”.

Related terms
Translations

See green/translations § Adjective.

References

Etymology 2

From Middle English grene, from the adjective (see above).

Noun

green (plural greens)

  1. The colour of growing foliage, as well as other plant cells containing chlorophyll; the colour between yellow and blue in the visible spectrum; one of the primary additive colour for transmitted light; the colour obtained by subtracting red and blue from white light using cyan and yellow filters.
  2. (politics, sometimes capitalised) A member of a green party; an environmentalist.
    Synonyms: environmentalist, (Australian) greenie, tree hugger, treehugger
    Hyponyms: blue green, red green
  3. (golf) A putting green, the part of a golf course near the hole.
  4. (bowls) The surface upon which bowls is played.
    Synonym: bowling green
  5. (snooker) One of the colour balls used in snooker, with a value of 3 points.
  6. (Britain) a public patch of land in the middle of a settlement.
  7. A grassy plain; a piece of ground covered with verdant herbage.
  8. (chiefly in the plural) Fresh leaves or branches of trees or other plants; wreaths.
  9. Any substance or pigment of a green colour.
  10. A green light used as a signal.
    • 1992, “How to Avoid the Most Embarrassing of Pilot Errors”, in Flying Magazine (volume 119, number 6, page 94)
      To the casual cockpit observer, landing-gear operation appears to be one of the most elementary tasks we have to perform. Either the switch is up and the lights are out, or it’s down and there are three greens.
  11. (Britain, slang, uncountable) marijuana.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:marijuana
  12. (US, slang, uncountable) Money.
  13. (particle physics) One of the three color charges for quarks.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

See green/translations § Noun.

Etymology 3

From Middle English grenen, from Old English grēnian (to become green, flourish), from Proto-Germanic *grōnijōną, *grōnijaną (to become green), from the adjective (see above). Cognate with Saterland Frisian gräinje, German Low German grönen, German grünen, Swedish gröna, Icelandic gróna.

Verb

green (third-person singular simple present greens, present participle greening, simple past and past participle greened)

  1. (transitive) To make (something) green, to turn (something) green.
    • Great spring before greened all the year.
  2. To become or grow green in colour.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, The Ancient Sage
      Her dust is greening in your leaf
    • 1886, John Greenleaf Whittier, “Flowers in Winter”
      by greening slope and singing flood
  3. (transitive) To add greenspaces to (a town, etc.).
    • 2000, AIA Guide to New York City (page 58)
      The newer 39-story, 1.5-million-square-foot tower occupies much of the original Shearson Garden, a larger parklet that briefly greened the construction site to be, and is remembered fondly by nearby Tribecans.
  4. (intransitive) To become environmentally aware.
  5. (transitive) To make (something) environmentally friendly.
Synonyms
  • (make (something) green): engreen
Derived terms
Translations

See green/translations § Verb.

See also

  • Appendix:Colors
  • Anagrams

    • Egner, Geren, genre, neger, regen

    Czech

    Etymology

    From English green.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): [ˈɡriːn]

    Noun

    green m

    1. (slang, golf) green (a putting green; the part of a golf course near the hole)

    Usage notes

    Although the official term for the green is jamkoviště, it is rarely used in practice. Instead, unofficial Czech versions of the English word green, variously spelled green, grýn, and grín, are used in practice.

    Declension

    References


    Danish

    Etymology

    From English green.

    Noun

    green c (definite singular greenen, indefinite plural greens, definite plural greenene)

    1. (golf) a green, putting green (the closely mown area surrounding each hole on a golf course)

    Further reading

    • “green” in Den Danske Ordbog

    Dutch

    Etymology 1

    Borrowed from North Germanic, from Old Norse grǫn.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ɣreːn/
    • Hyphenation: green
    • Rhymes: -eːn

    Noun

    green m (plural grenen)

    1. (obsolete) Scots pine, Pinus sylvestris
      Synonym: grove den
    Derived terms
    • grenen
    • grenenhout

    Etymology 2

    Borrowed from English green.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ɡriːn/
    • Hyphenation: green
    • Rhymes: -iːn

    Noun

    green m (plural greens)

    1. (golf) green, putting green

    German Low German

    Alternative forms

    • gren
    • (in some other dialects) gröön (grön)
    • (in some other dialects) gräun

    Adjective

    green

    1. (Low Prussian) green

    Middle English

    Alternative forms

    • gre, gree

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Old French greer; equivalent to gre +‎ -en (infinitival suffix).

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ˈɡreːən/

    Verb

    green (Late Middle English)

    1. To come to an understanding or agreement.
    2. (rare) To make a compact of reconciliation.

    Conjugation

    Descendants

    • English: gree (obsolete)
    • Scots: gree

    References

    • “grẹ̄en, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-09-15.

    North Frisian

    Etymology

    From Old Frisian grēne, from Proto-West Germanic *grōnī, from Proto-Germanic *grōniz.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ɡreːn/

    Adjective

    green

    1. (Föhr-Amrum, Sylt) green

    Norwegian Bokmål

    Noun

    green m (definite singular greenen, indefinite plural greener, definite plural greenene)

    1. (golf) a green, putting green (the closely mown area surrounding each hole on a golf course)

    Norwegian Nynorsk

    Noun

    green m (definite singular greenen, indefinite plural greenar, definite plural greenane)

    1. (golf) a green or putting green (the closely mown area surrounding each hole on a golf course)

    Swedish

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ɡriːn/
    • Rhymes: -iːn

    Noun

    green c

    1. (golf) a green, putting green (the closely mown area around a hole on a golf course)

    Declension

    Anagrams

    • gener, genre, neger


    English

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /dʒɛt/
    • Rhymes: -ɛt

    Etymology 1

    Borrowed from French jet (spurt, literally a throw), from Old French get, giet, from Vulgar Latin *iectus, jectus, from Latin iactus (a throwing, a throw), from iacere (to throw). See abject, ejaculate, gist, jess, jut. Cognate with Spanish echar.

    Noun

    jet (plural jets)

    1. A collimated stream, spurt or flow of liquid or gas from a pressurized container, an engine, etc.
    2. A spout or nozzle for creating a jet of fluid.
    3. (aviation) A type of airplane using jet engines rather than propellers.
    4. An engine that propels a vehicle using a stream of fluid as propulsion.
      1. A turbine.
      2. A rocket engine.
    5. A part of a carburetor that controls the amount of fuel mixed with the air.
    6. (physics) A narrow cone of hadrons and other particles produced by the hadronization of a quark or gluon.
    7. (dated) Drift; scope; range, as of an argument.
    8. (printing, dated) The sprue of a type, which is broken from it when the type is cold.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
    Derived terms
    Translations

    Verb

    jet (third-person singular simple present jets, present participle jetting, simple past and past participle jetted)

    1. (intransitive) To spray out of a container.
    2. (transitive) To spray with liquid from a container.
    3. (intransitive) To travel on a jet aircraft or otherwise by jet propulsion
    4. (intransitive) To move (running, walking etc.) rapidly around
    5. To shoot forward or out; to project; to jut out.
    6. To strut; to walk with a lofty or haughty gait; to be insolent; to obtrude.
      • c. 1593, William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus, Act II Scene 1,[1]
        Why, lords, and think you not how dangerous
        It is to jet upon a prince’s right?
      • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, Act II Scene 5,[2]
        Contemplation makes a rare turkey-cock of him: how he jets under his advanced plumes!
    7. To jerk; to jolt; to be shaken.
      • 1719, Richard Wiseman, Serjeant-Chirurgeon to King Charles II, Eight Chirurgical Treatises, London: B. Tooke et al., 5th edition, Volume 2, Book 5, Chapter 4, p. 78,[3]
        A Lady was wounded down the whole Length of the Forehead to the Nose [] It happened to her travelling in a Hackney-Coach, upon the jetting whereof she was thrown out of the hinder Seat against a Bar of Iron in the forepart of the Coach.
    8. To adjust the fuel to air ratio of a carburetor; to install or adjust a carburetor jet
    9. (slang) To leave.
    Translations

    Adjective

    jet (not comparable)

    1. Propelled by turbine engines.
      jet airplane
    Translations

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English get, geet, gete, from a northern form of Old French jayet, jaiet, gaiet, from Latin gagātēs, from Ancient Greek Γαγάτης (Gagátēs), from Γάγας (Gágas, a town and river in Lycia). Doublet of gagate.

    Noun

    jet (plural jets)

    1. (mineralogy) A hard, black form of coal, sometimes used in jewellery.
      Hypernyms: lignite, mineraloid
    2. (color) The colour of jet coal, deep grey.
    Alternative forms
    • jeat (obsolete)
    Derived terms
    • jet-black
    Descendants
    • German: Jett
    Translations

    Adjective

    jet (comparative jetter or more jet, superlative jettest or most jet)

    1. Very dark black in colour.
      Synonym: jet-black
      • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, p. 23:
        She was an ash blonde with greenish eyes, beaded lashes, hair waved smoothly back from ears in which large jet buttons glittered.
    Translations

    See also

    • Appendix:Colors

    Further reading

    • jet in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
    • jet on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
    • jet (gemstone) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

    Anagrams

    • tej

    Central Franconian

    Etymology

    From Old High German iowiht, from io (always) + wiht (thing) << Proto-West Germanic *wihti.

    Cognate with Middle Dutch iewet, iet (whence Limburgish get, contemporary Dutch iets), English aught.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /jɛt/, /jət/

    Pronoun

    jet (indefinite)

    1. (Ripuarian, northernmost Moselle Franconian) something; anything
      Luur ens, ich hann der jet metjebraht.

      Look, I’ve brought you something.

    Synonyms

    • eppes, ebbes (most of Moselle Franconian)

    Antonyms

    • nühs (nix)

    Czech

    Etymology

    From Proto-Slavic *ěxati, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ey-.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /jɛt/
    • Homophone: jed
    • Rhymes: -ɛt

    Verb

    jet impf

    1. to ride
    2. to go (by vehicle)

    Usage notes

    Jet is in the class of Czech concrete verbs. Its counterpart, jezdit, is an abstract verb.

    Conjugation

    Antonyms

    • nejet

    Derived terms

    • dojet
    • nadjet
    • podjet
    • projet
    • přejet
    • objet
    • rozjet
    • ujet
    • vjet
    • zajet

    Related terms

    See also

    • jezdit

    References

    Further reading

    • jeti in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
    • jeti in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

    French

    Etymology 1

    From Old French get, giet, from a Vulgar Latin *iectus, jectus, an alteration of Latin iactus (a throwing, throw).

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ʒɛ/

    Noun

    jet m (plural jets)

    1. throw
    2. spurt, spout, jet

    Derived terms

    Related terms

    • jeter

    Descendants

    • English: jet

    Further reading

    • “jet” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

    Etymology 2

    From English jet (airplane).

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /dʒɛt/

    Noun

    jet m (plural jets)

    1. jet (airplane)

    Further reading

    • “jet” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

    Friulian

    Noun

    jet m (plural jets)

    1. bed

    Middle English

    Noun

    jet

    1. Alternative form of get (jet)

    Old French

    Etymology

    From Latin iactus

    Noun

    jet

    1. throw

    Descendants

    • Anglo-Norman: jet
    • French: jet
      • English: jet

    Romanian

    Etymology

    From French jet.

    Noun

    jet n (plural jeturi)

    1. jet (of a gas of liquid)

    Declension


    Spanish

    Etymology

    Unadapted borrowing from English jet.

    Pronunciation

    Noun

    jet m (plural jets)

    1. jet

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