green vs park what difference

what is difference between green and park

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, General Australian) enPR: grēn, IPA(key): /ɡɹiːn/
  • (US, Canada) enPR: grēn, IPA(key): /ɡɹin/
  • Rhymes: -iːn

Etymology 1

From Middle English grene, from Old English grēne, from Proto-West Germanic *grōnī, from Proto-Germanic *grōniz (compare North Frisian green, West Frisian grien, Dutch groen, Low German grön, green, greun, German grün, Danish and Norwegian Nynorsk grøn, Swedish grön, Norwegian Bokmål grønn, Icelandic grænn), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰreh₁- (to grow). More at grow.

Adjective

green (comparative greener, superlative greenest)

  1. Having green as its color.
    Synonyms: verdant, vert
  2. (figuratively, of people) Sickly, unwell.
  3. Unripe, said of certain fruits that change color when they ripen.
  4. (figuratively) Inexperienced.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:inexperienced
    • 2008, Richard R. Rust, Renegade Champion: The Unlikely Rise of Fitzrada (page 91)
      He acted like a green racehorse, plunging over his jumps, tearing to the front of the field of riders.
  5. (figuratively, of people) Naive or unaware of obvious facts.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:gullible
  6. (figuratively, of people) Overcome with envy.
  7. (figuratively) Environmentally friendly.
    Synonym: eco-friendly
  8. (cricket) Describing a pitch which, even if there is no visible grass, still contains a significant amount of moisture.
  9. (dated) Of bacon or similar smallgoods: unprocessed, raw, unsmoked; not smoked or spiced.
    Synonyms: raw, unprocessed, unsmoked
  10. (dated) Not fully roasted; half raw.
    • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick, or The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry After Truth With a Variety of Rules to Guard
      We say the meat is green when half roasted.
  11. (film, television, historical) Of film: freshly processed by the laboratory and not yet fully physically hardened.
    • 1947, Theatre Catalog (volume 5, page 570)
      Following initial drying of film in a motion picture laboratory (after treatment in a hardening-fixing bath) the gelatin structure of an emulsion contracts and is permanently changed. The hardening action still continues for a time as a further small amount of residual moisture is given up. While traces of excess moisture remain, the emulsion is “green,” relatively soft, []
    • 1961, American Cinematographer (volume 42, page 618)
      [] attaching pre-photographed and pre-printed footage of a focusing chart to daily film footage without taking into consideration that such film may be worn or dried out and therefore, in its plane of best focus, would not be identical to that of the green film of the daily rushes.
  12. Of freshly cut wood or lumber that has not been dried: containing moisture and therefore relatively more flexible or springy.
  13. (wine) High or too high in acidity.
    Synonym: tart
  14. Full of life and vigour; fresh and vigorous; new; recent.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:new
    • 1790, Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France
      as valid against such an old and beneficent government as against [] the greenest usurpation
  15. (Philippines) Having a sexual connotation.
  16. (particle physics) Having a color charge of green.
  17. Being or relating to the green currencies of the European Union.
Antonyms
  • (having green as its colour): nongreen, ungreen
  • (having green as its colour charge): antigreen
  • (of bacon: unprocessed): processed, smoked, spiced
  • (of wine: high in acidity): cloy, sweet
  • (of certain fruits: ready to be eaten): ripe
Derived terms

Pages starting with “green”.

Related terms
Translations

See green/translations § Adjective.

References

Etymology 2

From Middle English grene, from the adjective (see above).

Noun

green (plural greens)

  1. The colour of growing foliage, as well as other plant cells containing chlorophyll; the colour between yellow and blue in the visible spectrum; one of the primary additive colour for transmitted light; the colour obtained by subtracting red and blue from white light using cyan and yellow filters.
  2. (politics, sometimes capitalised) A member of a green party; an environmentalist.
    Synonyms: environmentalist, (Australian) greenie, tree hugger, treehugger
    Hyponyms: blue green, red green
  3. (golf) A putting green, the part of a golf course near the hole.
  4. (bowls) The surface upon which bowls is played.
    Synonym: bowling green
  5. (snooker) One of the colour balls used in snooker, with a value of 3 points.
  6. (Britain) a public patch of land in the middle of a settlement.
  7. A grassy plain; a piece of ground covered with verdant herbage.
  8. (chiefly in the plural) Fresh leaves or branches of trees or other plants; wreaths.
  9. Any substance or pigment of a green colour.
  10. A green light used as a signal.
    • 1992, “How to Avoid the Most Embarrassing of Pilot Errors”, in Flying Magazine (volume 119, number 6, page 94)
      To the casual cockpit observer, landing-gear operation appears to be one of the most elementary tasks we have to perform. Either the switch is up and the lights are out, or it’s down and there are three greens.
  11. (Britain, slang, uncountable) marijuana.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:marijuana
  12. (US, slang, uncountable) Money.
  13. (particle physics) One of the three color charges for quarks.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

See green/translations § Noun.

Etymology 3

From Middle English grenen, from Old English grēnian (to become green, flourish), from Proto-Germanic *grōnijōną, *grōnijaną (to become green), from the adjective (see above). Cognate with Saterland Frisian gräinje, German Low German grönen, German grünen, Swedish gröna, Icelandic gróna.

Verb

green (third-person singular simple present greens, present participle greening, simple past and past participle greened)

  1. (transitive) To make (something) green, to turn (something) green.
    • Great spring before greened all the year.
  2. To become or grow green in colour.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, The Ancient Sage
      Her dust is greening in your leaf
    • 1886, John Greenleaf Whittier, “Flowers in Winter”
      by greening slope and singing flood
  3. (transitive) To add greenspaces to (a town, etc.).
    • 2000, AIA Guide to New York City (page 58)
      The newer 39-story, 1.5-million-square-foot tower occupies much of the original Shearson Garden, a larger parklet that briefly greened the construction site to be, and is remembered fondly by nearby Tribecans.
  4. (intransitive) To become environmentally aware.
  5. (transitive) To make (something) environmentally friendly.
Synonyms
  • (make (something) green): engreen
Derived terms
Translations

See green/translations § Verb.

See also

  • Appendix:Colors
  • Anagrams

    • Egner, Geren, genre, neger, regen

    Czech

    Etymology

    From English green.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): [ˈɡriːn]

    Noun

    green m

    1. (slang, golf) green (a putting green; the part of a golf course near the hole)

    Usage notes

    Although the official term for the green is jamkoviště, it is rarely used in practice. Instead, unofficial Czech versions of the English word green, variously spelled green, grýn, and grín, are used in practice.

    Declension

    References


    Danish

    Etymology

    From English green.

    Noun

    green c (definite singular greenen, indefinite plural greens, definite plural greenene)

    1. (golf) a green, putting green (the closely mown area surrounding each hole on a golf course)

    Further reading

    • “green” in Den Danske Ordbog

    Dutch

    Etymology 1

    Borrowed from North Germanic, from Old Norse grǫn.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ɣreːn/
    • Hyphenation: green
    • Rhymes: -eːn

    Noun

    green m (plural grenen)

    1. (obsolete) Scots pine, Pinus sylvestris
      Synonym: grove den
    Derived terms
    • grenen
    • grenenhout

    Etymology 2

    Borrowed from English green.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ɡriːn/
    • Hyphenation: green
    • Rhymes: -iːn

    Noun

    green m (plural greens)

    1. (golf) green, putting green

    German Low German

    Alternative forms

    • gren
    • (in some other dialects) gröön (grön)
    • (in some other dialects) gräun

    Adjective

    green

    1. (Low Prussian) green

    Middle English

    Alternative forms

    • gre, gree

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Old French greer; equivalent to gre +‎ -en (infinitival suffix).

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ˈɡreːən/

    Verb

    green (Late Middle English)

    1. To come to an understanding or agreement.
    2. (rare) To make a compact of reconciliation.

    Conjugation

    Descendants

    • English: gree (obsolete)
    • Scots: gree

    References

    • “grẹ̄en, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-09-15.

    North Frisian

    Etymology

    From Old Frisian grēne, from Proto-West Germanic *grōnī, from Proto-Germanic *grōniz.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ɡreːn/

    Adjective

    green

    1. (Föhr-Amrum, Sylt) green

    Norwegian Bokmål

    Noun

    green m (definite singular greenen, indefinite plural greener, definite plural greenene)

    1. (golf) a green, putting green (the closely mown area surrounding each hole on a golf course)

    Norwegian Nynorsk

    Noun

    green m (definite singular greenen, indefinite plural greenar, definite plural greenane)

    1. (golf) a green or putting green (the closely mown area surrounding each hole on a golf course)

    Swedish

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ɡriːn/
    • Rhymes: -iːn

    Noun

    green c

    1. (golf) a green, putting green (the closely mown area around a hole on a golf course)

    Declension

    Anagrams

    • gener, genre, neger


    English

    Etymology

    From Middle English park, from Old French parc (livestock pen), from Medieval Latin parcus, parricus, from Frankish *parrik (enclosure, pen), from Proto-Germanic *parrukaz (enclosure, fence). Cognate with Dutch perk (enclosure; flowerbed), Old High German pfarrih, pferrih (enclosure, pen), Old English pearroc (enclosure) (whence modern English paddock), Old Norse parrak, parak (enclosure, pen; distress, anxiety), Icelandic parraka (to keep pent in, under restraint and coercion). More at parrock, paddock.

    Pronunciation

    • enPR: pärk, IPA(key): /pɑɹk/
      • (General Australian, Boston) IPA(key): [paːk]
      • (NYC) IPA(key): [pɒək]
      • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): [pɐːk]
      • (UK) IPA(key): [pɑːk]
      • (US) IPA(key): [pɑɹk]
    • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)k

    Noun

    park (plural parks)

    1. An area of land set aside for environment preservation or recreation.
      1. A tract of ground kept in its natural state, about or adjacent to a residence, such as for the preservation of game, for walking, riding, or the like.
        • 17th century, Edmund Waller, At Penshurst
          While in the park I sing, the listening deer / Attend my passion, and forget to fear.
      2. A piece of ground in or near a city or town, enclosed and kept for ornament and recreation.
        • 1994, Robert Ferro,The Blue Star:
          I roamed the streets and parks, as far removed from the idea of art and pretense as I could take myself, discovering there the kind of truth I was supposed to be setting down on paper…
      3. An enclosed parcel of land stocked with animals for hunting, which one may have by prescription or royal grant.
    2. (US) A wide, flat-bottomed valley in a mountainous region.
    3. An area used for specific purposes.
      1. An open space occupied by or reserved for vehicles, matériel or stores.
      2. A partially enclosed basin in which oysters are grown.
      3. An area zoned for a particular (industrial or commercial) purpose.
      4. An area on which a sporting match is played; (soccer) a pitch.
    4. (Britain) An inventory of matériel.
    5. (Australia, New Zealand) A space in which to leave a car; a parking space.
      • 2003, “Johnny”, Melbourne Blackout, in Sleazegrinder (editor), Gigs from Hell: True Stories from Rock and Roll′s Frontline, page 174,
        We got to the 9th Ward and as luck would have it I found a park for my bro′s car right out the front.
      • 2010, Sandy Curtis, Dangerous Deception, Clan Destine Press, Australia, unnumbered page,
        Once they′d entered the floors of parking spaces, James found a park relatively easily, but Mark had difficulty, and only a swift sprint allowed him to catch up as James walked through the throngs of people in the casino with the determination of a man who didn′t want to be delayed.
      • 2011, Antonia Magee, The Property Diaries: A Story of Buying a House, Finding a Man and Making a Home … All on a Single Income!, John Wiley & Sons Australia, unnumbered page,
        We finally found a park and walked a few blocks to the building.

    Synonyms

    • (a piece of ground in or near a city): courtyard, garden, plaza

    Antonyms

    • (a piece of ground in or near a city): building, skyscraper, street

    Derived terms

    Descendants

    • Georgian: პარკი (ṗarḳi)
    • Irish: páirc
    • Japanese: パーク (pāku)
    • Scottish Gaelic: pàirc
    • Welsh: parc

    Translations

    Verb

    park (third-person singular simple present parks, present participle parking, simple past and past participle parked)

    1. (transitive) To bring (something such as a vehicle) to a halt or store in a specified place.
    2. (transitive, informal) To defer (a matter) until a later date.
    3. (transitive) To bring together in a park, or compact body.
    4. (transitive) To enclose in a park, or as in a park.
      • 1592, William Shakespeare, The First Part of King Henry the Sixth
        O, negligent and heedless discipline!
        How are we park’d and bounded in a pale,
        A little herd of England’s timorous deer,
        Mazed with a yelping kennel of French curs!
    5. (transitive, baseball) To hit a home run, to hit the ball out of the park.
    6. (intransitive, slang) To engage in romantic or sexual activities inside a nonmoving vehicle that was driven to a suitable spot for that purpose.
    7. (transitive, informal, sometimes reflexive) To sit, recline, or put, especially in a manner suggesting an intent to remain for some time.
    8. (transitive, finance) To invest money temporarily in an investment instrument considered to relatively free of risk, especially while awaiting other opportunities.
    9. (Internet) To register a domain name, but make no use of it (See domain parking)
    10. (transitive, oyster culture) To enclose in a park, or partially enclosed basin.
    11. (intransitive, dated) To promenade or drive in a park.
    12. (intransitive, dated, of horses) To display style or gait on a park drive.

    Antonyms

    (bring to a halt): unpark

    Derived terms

    • park and ride, park-and-ride

    Translations

    References

    • “Park” in James F. Dunnigan and Albert Nofi (1992), Dirty Little Secrets: Military Information You’re Not Supposed to Know, Harper, →ISBN, p 28.
    • Park in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

    Anagrams

    • KPRA, Karp, Prak

    Breton

    Noun

    park ?

    1. field

    Danish

    Etymology

    From French parc.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /paːrk/, [pʰɑːɡ̊]

    Noun

    park c (singular definite parken, plural indefinite parker)

    1. park

    Inflection


    Dutch

    Etymology

    From Middle Dutch parc, from Old Dutch *parruk, from Proto-Germanic *parrukaz (enclosure, fence). Doublet of perk.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /pɑrk/
    • Hyphenation: park
    • Rhymes: -ɑrk

    Noun

    park n (plural parken, diminutive parkje n)

    1. park

    Derived terms

    • attractiepark
    • dierenpark
    • kasteelpark
    • lunapark
    • nationaal park
    • natuurpark
    • parkopzichter
    • parkwachter
    • pretpark
    • safaripark
    • stadspark
    • themapark
    • vogelpark
    • volkspark
    • wagenpark
    • wandelpark

    Related terms

    • perk

    Descendants

    • Afrikaans: park
    • German: Park (partially)
      • Lower Sorbian: park
    • West Frisian: park

    German

    Pronunciation

    Verb

    park

    1. singular imperative of parken
    2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of parken

    Hungarian

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): [ˈpɒrk]
    • Rhymes: -ɒrk

    Noun

    park (plural parkok)

    1. park

    Declension

    Derived terms

    • nemzeti park

    See also

    • parkol

    Further reading

    • park in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

    Lower Sorbian

    Etymology

    Borrowed from German Park, from Old French parc (livestock pen), from Medieval Latin parcus, parricus, from Frankish *parric (enclosure, pen), from Proto-Germanic *parrukaz (enclosure, fence).

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /park/

    Noun

    park m

    1. park (piece of ground, in or near a city or town, enclosed and kept for ornament and recreation)

    Declension

    Derived terms

    • parkowy

    Middle English

    Alternative forms

    • parc, parck, perke, paric

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Old French park.

    Noun

    park (plural parks)

    1. enclosure

    Descendants

    • English: park
    • Yola: park

    References

    • “park, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

    Norwegian Bokmål

    Etymology

    From Medieval Latin parricus, via French parc

    Noun

    park m (definite singular parken, indefinite plural parker, definite plural parkene)

    1. a park (preserved green open space, usually open to the public)

    Derived terms


    Norwegian Nynorsk

    Etymology

    From Medieval Latin parricus, via French parc

    Noun

    park m (definite singular parken, indefinite plural parkar, definite plural parkane)

    1. a park (as above)

    Derived terms


    Polish

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /park/

    Noun

    park m inan

    1. park (e.g., a ground for recreation in a city or town)
    2. (obsolete) A scent released by goats, deer, or hares during breeding periods.
    3. (obsolete) Breeding period of goats, deer, or hares.

    Declension

    Further reading

    • park in Polish dictionaries at PWN

    Serbo-Croatian

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /pârk/

    Noun

    pȁrk m (Cyrillic spelling па̏рк)

    1. park

    Declension


    Swedish

    Etymology

    From Old Norse parrak, from Proto-Germanic *parrukaz.

    Pronunciation

    Noun

    park c (plural parker, definite singular parken, definite plural parkerna)

    1. park (in a city)

    Declension

    Anagrams

    • karp

    Turkish

    Etymology

    From French parc.

    Noun

    park (definite accusative parkı, plural parklar)

    1. park

    Declension


    Yola

    Etymology

    From Middle English park.

    Noun

    park

    1. a park, inclosure

    References

    • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

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