greensward vs turf what difference

what is difference between greensward and turf

English

Alternative forms

  • green-sward, green sward

Etymology

From green +‎ sward.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡɹiːnswɔːd/

Noun

greensward (countable and uncountable, plural greenswards)

  1. A tract of land that is green with grass.
    • 1879, Proceedings of the Dorset Natural History and Antiquarian Field Club, Volumes 3-4, page 74,
      Ventagladia is also a Latin form of the name Vindogladia, and would, as it seems to me, be a good name for the broad reach of greensward below, above and south of Woodyates’ Inn. Gwent gledd would mean the open or unenclosed land of greensward.
    • 1913, Charles Benjamin Purdom, The Garden City: A Study in the Development of a Modern Town, page 258,
      One of the first roads was Norton Way, running from north to south of the town area, and is 60 feet between boundaries, with a 16-foot carriage way of 9-inch slag bottom and 4-inch granite metalling, kerbed with 4-inch pennant kerbing; on either side two 12-foot greenswards and two 10-foot paths; the surface being drained by open ditches in the greensward (Plate VI., No 3).
    • 2015, Colin Fisher, Urban Green: Nature, Recreation, and the Working Class in Industrial Chicago, University of North Carolina Press, page 16,
      He followed much of Olmsted and Vaux’s plan, creating features such as South Open Ground, a vast greensward created by thinning out native oaks and shaping tons of soil and animal waste into “pleasing slopes and graceful undulations.”

Derived terms

  • greenswarded

Translations

See also

  • grassland
  • green
  • lea
  • meadow
  • pasture

Further reading

  • Grassland on Wikipedia.Wikipedia


English

Etymology

From Middle English turf, torf, from Old English turf (turf, sod, soil, piece of grass covered earth, greensward), from Proto-West Germanic *turb, from Proto-Germanic *turbz (turf, lawn), from Proto-Indo-European *derbʰ- (tuft, grass). Cognate with Dutch turf (turf), Middle Low German torf (peat, turf) (whence German Torf and German Low German Torf), Swedish torv (turf), Norwegian torv (turf), Icelandic torf (turf), Russian трава (trava, grass), Sanskrit दर्भ (darbhá, a kind of grass), दूर्वा (dū́rvā, bent grass).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /tɝf/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /tɜːf/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)f
  • Homophone: TERF

Noun

turf (countable and uncountable, plural turfs or turves)

  1. (uncountable) A layer of earth covered with grass; sod.
  2. (countable) A piece of such a layer cut from the soil. May be used as sod to make a lawn, dried for peat, stacked to form earthen structures, etc.
  3. (countable, Ireland) A sod of peat used as fuel.
  4. (uncountable, slang) A territory claimed by a person, gang, etc. as their own.
  5. (uncountable, with “the”) A racetrack; or the sport of racing horses.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

turf (third-person singular simple present turfs, present participle turfing, simple past and past participle turfed)

  1. To cover with turf; to create a lawn by laying turfs.
  2. (Ultimate Frisbee) To throw a frisbee well short of its intended target, usually causing it to hit the ground within 10 yards of its release.
  3. (business) To fire from a job or dismiss from a task.
    Eight managers were turfed after the merger of the two companies.
  4. (business) To cancel a project or product.
    The company turfed the concept car because the prototype performed poorly.
  5. (informal, transitive) To expel, eject, or throw out; to turf out.
  6. (medical slang, transitive) To transfer or attempt to transfer (a patient or case); to eschew or avoid responsibility for.

Derived terms

  • turfer
  • turf out

Translations

Anagrams

  • ruft

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʏrf/
  • Hyphenation: turf
  • Rhymes: -ʏrf

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch torf, from Old Dutch *torf, from Proto-Germanic *turbz (turf, lawn), from Proto-Indo-European *derbʰ- (tuft, grass).

Noun

turf m (plural turven, diminutive turfje n)

  1. peat
  2. A tally mark representing five.
  3. (informal) A fat book, tome; a book containing many pages.
Derived terms
  • turfgas
  • turfsteker
  • turfwinning

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

turf

  1. first-person singular present indicative of turven
  2. imperative of turven

Anagrams

  • ruft

Hungarian

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈturf]
  • Hyphenation: turf
  • Rhymes: -urf

Noun

turf (plural turfok)

  1. (sports) turf (a racetrack or the sport of racing horses)

Declension

Further reading

  • turf in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • turfe, torf, tourfe

Etymology

From Old English turf, from Proto-West Germanic *turb, from Proto-Germanic *turbz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /turf/

Noun

turf (plural turfes or turves)

  1. soil, earth

Descendants

  • English: turf
  • Yola: dhrivès (plural)

References

  • “turf, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *turbz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /turf/, [turˠf]

Noun

turf f (nominative plural tyrf)

  1. turf

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: turf, turfe, torf, tourfe
    • English: turf
    • Yola: dhrivès (plural)

References

  • Joseph Bosworth and T. Northcote Toller (1898), “turf”, in An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Spanish

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

turf m (plural turfs)

  1. racetrack

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