greet vs recognise what difference

what is difference between greet and recognise

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹiːt/
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Etymology 1

From Middle English greten, from Old English grētan, from Proto-Germanic *grōtijaną.

Verb

greet (third-person singular simple present greets, present participle greeting, simple past and past participle greeted)

  1. (transitive) To welcome in a friendly manner, either in person or through another means such as writing.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Richard III, Act III, scene 1
      My lord, the mayor of London comes to greet you.
    • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars, Chapter I,
      Warwick observed, as they passed through the respectable quarter, that few people who met the girl greeted her, and that some others whom she passed at gates or doorways gave her no sign of recognition; from which he inferred that she was possibly a visitor in the town and not well acquainted.
  2. (transitive) To arrive at or reach, or meet.
    • 1707, Joseph Addison, Rosamond, Act I, scene 4
      In vain the spring my senses greets.
    • 2009, Loren Long, ‎Phil Bildner, Magic in the Outfield (page 47)
      Way deep in left field, where the carpet of green sloped upward to a terrace and greeted the thick line of trees, he reached out his glove.
  3. (transitive) To accost; to address.
    • 1725, Alexander Pope translating Homer, Odyssey
      Fair on his feet the polish’d sandals shine,
      And thus he greets the master of the swine:
  4. (intransitive, archaic) To meet and give salutations.
    • circa 1590, William Shakespeare, Titus Adronicus, Act I, scene 2, line 90
      There greet in silence, as the dead are wont, And sleep in peace.
  5. (transitive) To be perceived by (somebody).
Conjugation

Derived terms

  • greeter
  • meet-and-greet
  • regreet

Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English greet, grete (great).

Adjective

greet (comparative more greet, superlative most greet)

  1. (obsolete outside Scotland) Great.

Etymology 3

From a blend of two Old English verbs, grētan, grǣtan (itself from Proto-Germanic *grētaną); and of Old English grēotan (itself from Proto-Germanic *greutaną), both meaning “to weep, lament”.

Verb

greet (third-person singular simple present greets, present participle greeting, simple past and past participle greeted or grat or grutten)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) To weep; to cry.
    • 1933, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Cloud Howe, Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), page 312:
      And damn’t! if he didn’t take down her bit things and scone her so sore she grat like a bairn […].
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, page 2:
      My maw went potty and started greeting.

Related terms

  • regret

Noun

greet (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Mourning, weeping, lamentation.

Further reading

  • Frank Graham (1987) The New Geordie Dictionary, →ISBN
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4
  • greet in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • Geter, egret, reget

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • grete
  • girt, gert (dialectal)

Etymology

From Old English grēat, in turn from Proto-Germanic *grautaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrɛːt/

Adjective

greet (plural and weak singular greete, comparative greter, superlative gretest)

  1. great (large, significant)

Descendants

  • English: great, (dialectal) gert
    • Welsh: grêt
  • Scots: great, greet, grete, greit

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrit/

Etymology 1

From a blend of two Old English verbs, grētan (cognate with Swedish gråta‘, Danish græde) and grēotan (of uncertain ultimate origin), both ‘weep, lament’.

Verb

greet (third-person singular present greets, present participle greetin, past grat or grettit, past participle grutten)

  1. to weep, lament

Noun

greet (uncountable)

  1. cry, lamentation

Etymology 2

Adjective

greet (comparative greeter, superlative greetest)

  1. Alternative form of great


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɛkənaɪz/, /ˈɹɛkəɡnaɪz/

Verb

recognise (third-person singular simple present recognises, present participle recognising, simple past and past participle recognised)

  1. (Non-Oxford British English) Alternative form of recognize

Anagrams

  • cinegoers, congeries

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