greyback vs knot what difference

what is difference between greyback and knot

English

Alternative forms

  • grayback

Etymology

From grey +‎ back.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡɹeɪbak/

Noun

greyback (plural greybacks)

  1. (historical, US, colloquial) A Confederate soldier during the US Civil War (because of the grey uniforms).
    • 1988, James McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom, Oxford 2004, p. 739:
      Sheridan managed to keep the graybacks at bay while he tore up the railroad, but he abandoned the plan to link up with Hunter, and the southerners soon repaired the railroad.
  2. (dated) A louse.
    • 1886, Central Reporter: Cases, Courts of Last Resort
      It is alleged by the defendant that there were scabs and greybacks in it, and that it did not come up to the quality of No. 1 slate as contracted for.
  3. A local name for various grey birds.

Derived terms

  • greyback cane grub
  • greyback goose


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: nŏt, IPA(key): /nɒt/
  • (General American) enPR: nŏt, IPA(key): /nɑt/
  • Homophones: not, naught (in accents with the cot-caught merger)
  • Rhymes: -ɒt

Etymology 1

From Middle English knotte, from Old English cnotta, from Proto-Germanic *knuttô, *knudô (knot); (cognate with Old High German knoto (German Knoten, Dutch knot, Low German Knütte); compare also Old Norse knútr > Danish knude, Swedish knut, Norwegian knute, Faroese knútur, Icelandic hnútur). Probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gnod- (to bind), compare Latin nōdus and its Romance descendants. Doublet of node.

Noun

knot (plural knots)

  1. A looping of a piece of string or of any other long, flexible material that cannot be untangled without passing one or both ends of the material through its loops.
    Climbers must make sure that all knots are both secure and of types that will not weaken the rope.
  2. (of hair, etc) A tangled clump.
    The nurse was brushing knots from the protesting child’s hair.
  3. A maze-like pattern.
  4. (mathematics) A non-self-intersecting closed curve in (e.g., three-dimensional) space that is an abstraction of a knot (in sense 1 above).
    A knot can be defined as a non-self-intersecting broken line whose endpoints coincide: when such a knot is constrained to lie in a plane, then it is simply a polygon.
        A knot in its original sense can be modeled as a mathematical knot (or link) as follows: if the knot is made with a single piece of rope, then abstract the shape of that rope and then extend the working end to merge it with the standing end, yielding a mathematical knot. If the knot is attached to a metal ring, then that metal ring can be modeled as a trivial knot and the pair of knots become a link. If more than one mathematical knot (or link) can be thus obtained, then the simplest one (avoiding detours) is probably the one which one would want.
  5. A difficult situation.
    I got into a knot when I inadvertently insulted a policeman.
    • 1664, Robert South, A Sermon Preached Before the University at Christ-Church, Oxon
      A man shall be perplexed with knots, and problems of business, and contrary affairs.
  6. The whorl left in lumber by the base of a branch growing out of the tree’s trunk.
    When preparing to tell stories at a campfire, I like to set aside a pile of pine logs with lots of knots, since they burn brighter and make dramatic pops and cracks.
  7. Local swelling in a tissue area, especially skin, often due to injury.
    Jeremy had a knot on his head where he had bumped it on the bedframe.
  8. A tightened and contracted part of a muscle that feels like a hard lump under the skin.
  9. A protuberant joint in a plant.
  10. Any knob, lump, swelling, or protuberance.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Lancelot and Elaine
      With lips severely placid, felt the knot / Climb in her throat.
  11. the swelling of the bulbus glandis in members of the dog family, Canidae
  12. The point on which the action of a story depends; the gist of a matter.
    the knot of the tale
  13. (engineering) A node.
  14. A kind of epaulet; a shoulder knot.
  15. A group of people or things.
    • 1968, Bryce Walton, Harpoon Gunner, Thomas Y. Crowell Company, NY, (1968), page 20,
      He pushed through knots of whalemen grouped with their families and friends, and surrounded by piles of luggage.
  16. A bond of union; a connection; a tie.
    • 1646, Joseph Hall, The Balm of Gilead
      ere we knit the knot that can never be loosed
  17. (aviation, nautical) A unit of speed, equal to one nautical mile per hour. (From the practice of counting the number of knots in the log-line (as it is paid out) in a standard time. Traditionally spaced at one every 1120 of a mile.)
    Cedric claimed his old yacht could make 12 knots.
  18. (nautical) A nautical mile
  19. (slang) The bulbus glandis
  20. (fandom slang) In omegaverse fiction, a bulbus glandis-like structure on the penis of a male alpha, which ties him to an omega during intercourse.
    • 2014, Mark Shrayber, “‘Knotting’ Is the Weird Fanfic Sex Trend That Cannot Be Unseen”, Jezebel, 18 July 2014:
      Since the knot won’t release until the alpha has finished and can’t be controlled by either party, the sex has to go on until it’s done.
    • 2017, Taylor Boulware, “Fascination/Frustration: Slash Fandom, Genre, and Queer Uptake”, dissertation submitted to the University of Washington, page 155:
      The pair cannot separate until the knot has subsided – anywhere from twenty minutes to hours, depending on the fic.
    • 2017, Marianne Gunderson, “What is an omega? Rewriting sex and gender in omegaverse fanfiction”, thesis submitted to the University of Oslo, page 89:
      When John bites down on Sherlock’s neck as his knot locks them together, the act which would otherwise be a tool for domination only reinforces the existing emotional bonds they have for each other.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:knot.
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • (whorl in wood): shake

Verb

knot (third-person singular simple present knots, present participle knotting, simple past and past participle knotted)

  1. (transitive) To form into a knot; to tie with a knot or knots.
    We knotted the ends of the rope to keep it from unravelling.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, St. Simeon Stylites
      as tight as I could knot the noose
  2. (transitive) To form wrinkles in the forehead, as a sign of concentration, concern, surprise, etc.
    She knotted her brow in concentration while attempting to unravel the tangled strands.
  3. To unite closely; to knit together.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  4. (transitive, obsolete, rare) To entangle or perplex; to puzzle.
  5. (intransitive) To form knots.
  6. (intransitive) To knit knots for a fringe.
Synonyms
  • (form into a knot): bind, tie
  • (form wrinkles in forehead): knit
  • (unite closely): attach, join, put together; see also Thesaurus:join
  • (entangle or perplex): baffle, flummox; see also Thesaurus:confuse
Antonyms
  • (form into a knot): loosen, unbind, unknot, untie
Translations

See also

Etymology 2

Supposed to be derived from the name of King Canute, with whom the bird was a favourite article of food. See the specific epithet canutus.

Noun

knot (plural knots or knot)

  1. One of a variety of shore birds; the red-breasted sandpiper (variously Calidris canutus or Tringa canutus).
    • c.1610, Ben Jonson, The Alchemist
      My foot-boy shall eat pheasants, calvered salmons, / Knots, godwits, lampreys: I myself will have / The beards of barbels, served instead of salads []

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • Red Knot on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Tkon, Tonk, tonk

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈknot]

Noun

knot m

  1. A candle wick

Declension

Further reading

  • knot in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • knot in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /knɔt/

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch cnudde, Old Dutch *knotto, from Proto-Germanic *knuttan-, *knuttô.

Related to knod, English knot, West Frisian knotte, Middle High German Knotze, German Knoten, Danish knude, Norwegian knute, Swedish knut, etc.

Noun

knot f or m (plural knotten, diminutive knotje n)

  1. A knot, bun (of hair), skein
  2. The top or crest (with messy branches) of certain woody plants, notably willows
  3. A flax seed box
  4. (dialect) A marble to play with
  5. A prank, joke
Derived terms
  • knotten (verb)
  • knotrank
  • knottenkaf n
  • haarknot
  • vlasknot
  • beknotten (verb)
Related terms
  • knotwilg

Etymology 2

From the cognate English knot, possibly influenced by Vulgar Latin canutus (grey-headed”, “grizzled)

Noun

knot f or m (plural knotten, diminutive knotje n)

  1. The bird species Calidris canutus (syn. Tringa canutis)
Synonyms
  • kanoetstrandloper m
  • kanoetvogel m

Anagrams

  • kont

Middle English

Noun

knot

  1. Alternative form of knotte

Polish

Etymology

From Middle High German knotze.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /knɔt/

Noun

knot m inan (diminutive knotek or knocik)

  1. wick (of a candle)

Declension

Further reading

  • knot in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • knot in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Upper Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *krъtъ.

Noun

knot m anim

  1. mole, talpid (mammal of the family Talpidae)

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