grid vs gridiron what difference

what is difference between grid and gridiron

English

Etymology

From a shortening of griddle or gridiron.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹɪd/
  • Hyphenation: grid
  • Rhymes: -ɪd

Noun

grid (plural grids)

  1. A rectangular array of squares or rectangles of equal size, such as in a crossword puzzle.
  2. A tiling of the plane with regular polygons; a honeycomb.
  3. A system for delivery of electricity, consisting of various substations, transformers and generators, connected by wire.
    • 1988, Die Hard (movie)
      You can’t turn off the building from here; you have to shut down the whole grid.
  4. (computing) A system or structure of distributed computers working mostly on a peer-to-peer basis, used mainly to solve single and complex scientific or technical problems or to process data at high speeds (as in clusters).
  5. (cartography) A method of marking off maps into areas.
  6. (motor racing) The pattern of starting positions of the drivers for a race.
  7. (electronics) The third (or higher) electrode of a vacuum tube (triode or higher).
  8. (electricity) A battery-plate somewhat like a grating, especially a zinc plate in a primary battery, or a lead plate in a secondary or storage battery.
  9. A grating of parallel bars; a gridiron.

Hyponyms

  • national grid
  • numerical grid
  • supergrid

Derived terms

  • gridlock
  • supergrid

Related terms

Translations

See also

References

  • grid on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

grid (third-person singular simple present grids, present participle gridding, simple past and past participle gridded)

  1. To mark with a grid.
  2. To assign a reference grid to.

Translations

Further reading

  • grid in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • grid in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • gird

Gothic

Romanization

grid

  1. Romanization of ????????????????

Portuguese

Noun

grid m (plural grids)

  1. (computing) grid (system distributed computers)
  2. (motor racing) grid (starting positions of the drivers for a race)

Synonyms

  • starting positions of racers grid de largada


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡɹɪdaɪən/

Etymology 1

Origin uncertain, perhaps related to griddle. The ending was assimilated to iron, as if from grid +‎ iron, whence grid was later derived.

Noun

gridiron (plural gridirons)

  1. An instrument of torture on which people were secured before being burned by fire. [from 13th c.]
  2. An iron rack or grate used for broiling meat and fish over coals. [from 14th c.]

Related terms

  • iron
  • grid

Derived terms

  • gridiron football
  • gridiron pendulum
  • gridiron valve

Translations

Etymology 2

From resembling the shape of a gridiron (a square rectilinear grid)

Noun

gridiron (countable and uncountable, plural gridirons)

  1. Any object resembling the rack or grate. [from 15th c.]
  2. (nautical) An openwork frame on which vessels are placed for examination, cleaning, and repairs.
  3. (theater) A raised framework from which lighting is suspended.
  4. (American football) The field on which American football is played. [from 19th c.]
  5. (uncountable, Australia and New Zealand) American and Canadian football, particularly when used to distinguish from other codes of football.
    • 1995 October 3, Peter O′Shea, Sports: Out on the field, The Advocate, page 54,
      He represented Australia in this year′s rugby tour of England and is as well-known in Australia as any top gridiron player is in the United States.
    • 2001, Langston Hughes, Dolan Hubbard, Jackie Robinson: First Negro in Big League Baseball: 1919—, The Collected Works of Langston Hughes, Volume 12: Works for Children and Young Adults, page 106,
      So Jackie′s name became known far and wide as an exceptional gridiron player.
    • 2009, Deborah Healey, Sport and the Law, reference note, UNSW Press, page 271,
      119 Yasser (1985) cites the famous US example of gridiron player Dick Butkus of the Chicago Bears.
Synonyms
  • (playing field for American football): football field
  • (football, Canadian and American): North American football, gridiron football, football (North American English)
  • (American football): football (US English)
Translations

Verb

gridiron (third-person singular simple present gridirons, present participle gridironing, simple past and past participle gridironed)

  1. To mark or cover with lines; to crisscross.
    • 1901, Archibald John Little, Mount Omi and Beyond: A Record of Travel on the Thibetan Border, Cambridge University Press, 2010, Conclusion, p. 242, [1]
      This basin of Szechuan (literally “Four Streams,” but which, reading the character idiographically, I should be inclined to render as “Gridironed by Streams”), []
    • 1923, Maximilian P.E. Groszmann, A Parent’s Manual: Child Problems, Mental and Moral, New York: Century, p. 74, [2]
      Another logical method is that of gridironing the field by a series of straight paths that are parallel to each other.
    • 1924, Herman Melville, Billy Budd, London: Constable & Co., Chapter 8, [3]
      When Billy saw the culprit’s naked back under the scourge gridironed with red welts, and worse [] Billy was horrified.
    • 1949, Lewis Sinclair, The God-Seeker, New York: Popular Library, Chapter 42, p. 227,
      His white back, gridironed with scars, was as soft as a baby’s.
    • 2012, Janet Wallach, The Richest Woman in America: Hetty Green in the Gilded Age, New York: Anchor Books, 2013, Chapter 8, p. 111, [4]
      Railways spanned the continent and gridironed the states.
  2. (New Zealand, historical) To purchase land so that the remaining adjacent sections are smaller than the minimum area purchasable as freehold, thus excluding potential freeholders.

See also

  • gridiron on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • gridiron on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

References


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