grievance vs score what difference

what is difference between grievance and score

English

Alternative forms

  • grievaunce (archaic)

Etymology

From Old French grievance, from the verb grever (to irritate; to bother; to annoy) + -ance.

Pronunciation

  • (Canada, General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡɹi.vəns/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɡɹiː.vəns/
  • Rhymes: -ivəns

Noun

grievance (countable and uncountable, plural grievances)

  1. (countable) Something which causes grief.
  2. (countable) A wrong or hardship suffered, which is the grounds of a complaint.
    • November 2 2014, Daniel Taylor, “Sergio Agüero strike wins derby for Manchester City against 10-man United,” guardian.co.uk
      Wayne Rooney spent much of the game remonstrating with Oliver about his own grievances and, in the interest of balance, there were certainly occasions when United had legitimate complaints.
  3. (uncountable) Feelings of being wronged; outrage.
  4. (countable) A complaint or annoyance.
  5. (countable) A formal complaint, especially in the context of a unionized workplace.
    If you want the problem fixed, you’ll have to file a grievance with the city.
  6. (uncountable) Violation of regulations or objectionable behavior.

Translations

Anagrams

  • caregiven

Old French

Noun

grievance f (oblique plural grievances, nominative singular grievance, nominative plural grievances)

  1. Alternative form of grevance


English

Etymology

From Middle English score, skore, schore, from Old English scoru (notch; tally; score), from Old Norse skor, from Proto-Germanic *skurō (incision; tear; rift), which is related to *skeraną (to cut).

Cognate with Icelandic skora, Swedish skåra, Danish skår. Related to shear.
(For twenty: The mark on a tally made by drovers for every twenty beasts passing through a tollgate.)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: skôr, IPA(key): /skɔː/
  • (General American) enPR: skôrʹ, IPA(key): /skɔɹ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: skōrʹ, IPA(key): /sko(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /skoə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)

Noun

score (plural scores)

  1. The total number of goals, points, runs, etc. earned by a participant in a game.
  2. The number of points accrued by each of the participants in a game, expressed as a ratio or a series of numbers.
  3. The performance of an individual or group on an examination or test, expressed by a number, letter, or other symbol; a grade.
  4. Twenty, 20.
  5. (gambling) An amount of money won in gambling; winnings.
    • 2013, Arnold Snyder, Big Book of Blackjack
      Use a few “introductory plays” to become known to a casino before you go for a big score.
  6. A distance of twenty yards, in ancient archery and gunnery.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  7. A weight of twenty pounds.
  8. (music) The written form of a musical composition showing all instrumental and vocal parts below each other.
  9. (music) The music of a movie or play.
  10. Subject.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 245e.
      Well, although we haven’t discussed the views of all those who make precise reckonings of being and not [being], we’ve done enough on that score.
  11. Account; reason; motive; sake; behalf.
    • But left the trade, as many more / Have lately done on the same score.
    • 1665, John Dryden, The Indian Emperour
      You act your kindness on Cydria’s score.
  12. A notch or incision; especially, one that is made as a tally mark; hence, a mark, or line, made for the purpose of account.
  13. An account or reckoning; account of dues; bill; debt.
  14. (US, crime, slang) a criminal act, especially:
    1. A robbery.
    2. A bribe paid to a police officer.
    3. An illegal sale, especially of drugs.
    4. A prostitute’s client.
  15. (US, vulgar, slang) A sexual conquest.

Usage notes

As a quantity, a score is counted as any other unit: ten score, twelve score, fourteen score, etc. (or tenscore, twelvescore). There is no word for 202; rather, twenty score is used, and twice that forty score.

Synonyms

  • (prostitute’s client): see Thesaurus:prostitute’s client

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

score (third-person singular simple present scores, present participle scoring, simple past and past participle scored)

  1. (transitive) To cut a notch or a groove in a surface.
  2. (intransitive) To record the tally of points for a game, a match, or an examination.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To obtain something desired.
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 50
      “Of course it would be hypocritical for me to pretend that I regret what Abraham did. After all, I’ve scored by it.”
    1. To earn points in a game.
    2. To achieve (a score) in e.g. a test.
      • 2004, Diane McGuinness, Early reading instruction: what science really tells us about how to teach reading
        At the end of first grade, the children scored 80 percent correct on this test, a value that remained unchanged through third grade.
    3. (gambling) To win money by gambling.
      • 2005, Shannon Nash, For the Love of Money (page 215)
        [] he scored big by hitting the jack pot at the Bellagio (he won $7,000). The next day, he won $15,000 on the nickel machines at the Palm Casino!
    4. (slang) To acquire or gain.
    5. (US, crime, slang, of a police officer) To extract a bribe.
    6. (vulgar, slang) To obtain a sexual favor.
  4. (transitive) To provide (a film, etc.) with a musical score.
    • 1974, New York Magazine (volume 7, number 45, page 98)
      Godfather II is nothing like ready. It is not yet scored, and thus not mixed. There remain additional shooting, looping, editing.

Synonyms

  • (to cut a groove in a surface): groove, notch
  • (to record the score): keep, score, tally
  • (to earn points in a game):
  • (to achieve a score in a test):
  • (to acquire or gain): come by, earn, obtain; see also Thesaurus:receive
  • (to extract a bribe): shake down
  • (to obtain a sexual favor): pull
  • (to provide with a musical score): soundtrack

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Irish: scóráil

Translations

Interjection

score!

  1. (US, slang) Acknowledgement of success

See also

  • grade

References

  • Tom Dalzell, The Routledge Dictionary of Modern American Slang and Unconventional English, 2008, page 846

Anagrams

  • Corse, Crose, ROCEs, Secor, Sorce, ceros, cores, corse, creos, ocres

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English score.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skoːrə/, [ˈsɡ̊oːɐ]

Noun

score c (singular definite scoren, plural indefinite scorer)

  1. A score, a number of points earned.

Declension

Verb

score

  1. score a goal/point
  2. land (to acquire; to secure)
  3. (slang) steal
  4. persuade (someone) to have sex with oneself [from 1959]

Conjugation

Derived terms


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English score.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈskoː.rə/
  • Hyphenation: sco‧re

Noun

score m (plural scores, diminutive scoretje n)

  1. score (number of points earned)

Derived terms

  • scorebord

Related terms

  • scoren

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English score.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skɔʁ/

Noun

score m (plural scores)

  1. score (in a sport, game)

Derived terms

  • scorer

Further reading

  • “score” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • corse, Corse
  • ocres

Norwegian Bokmål

Alternative forms

  • (of noun) skår
  • (of verb) skåre

Etymology

Via English score, from Old Norse skor. Related to Old Norse skera (modern Norwegian Bokmål skjære).

Noun

score m (definite singular scoren, indefinite plural scorer, definite plural scorene)

  1. a score

Verb

score (imperative scor, present tense scorer, passive scores, simple past and past participle scora or scoret, present participle scorende)

  1. to score (earn points in a game)

Derived terms

  • scorer
  • scoring
  • scoringsposisjon
  • scoringssjanse

References

  • “score” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “score” in The Ordnett Dictionary

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • (of noun) skår
  • (of verb) skåre, skåra
  • (of verb) scora

Etymology

Borrowed from English score. Doublet of skòr.

Noun

score m (definite singular scoren, indefinite plural scorar, definite plural scorane)

  1. a score

Verb

score (present tense scorar, past tense scora, past participle scora, passive infinitive scorast, present participle scorande, imperative scor)

  1. to score (earn points in a game)

References

  • “score” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Spanish

Etymology

From English score.

Noun

score m (plural scores)

  1. (sports) score

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