grieve vs sorrow what difference

what is difference between grieve and sorrow

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, US) IPA(key): /ɡɹiːv/
  • Rhymes: -iːv

Etymology 1

From Middle English greven, from Old French grever (to burden), from Latin gravō, gravāre, from adjective gravis (grave).

Verb

grieve (third-person singular simple present grieves, present participle grieving, simple past and past participle grieved)

  1. (transitive) To cause sorrow or distress to.
    • Grieve not the Holy Spirit of God.
    • Thy maidens griev’d themselves at my concern.
  2. (transitive) To feel very sad about; to mourn; to sorrow for.
    to grieve one’s fate
  3. (intransitive) To experience grief.
  4. (transitive, archaic) To harm.
  5. (transitive) To submit or file a grievance (about).
    • 2009 D’Amico, Rob, Editor, Texas Teacher, published by Texas AFT (affiliate of American Federation of Teachers, AFL-CIO); “Austin classified employees gain due process rights”, April 2009, p14:
      Even if the executive director rules against the employee on appeal, the employee can still grieve the termination to the superintendent followed by an appeal to the […] Board of Trustees.
Derived terms
  • begrieve
  • grieved
  • griever
  • grievingly
Related terms
  • grievance
  • grievous
  • grief
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English greve, greyve, grave, grafe, from Old Norse greifi, from Middle Low German grēve, grâve,
related to Old English grœfa, groefa, variants of Old English ġerēfa (steward, reeve). More at reeve.

Noun

grieve (plural grieves)

  1. (obsolete) A governor of a town or province.
  2. (chiefly Scotland) A manager or steward, e.g. of a farm.
Derived terms
  • grieveship

Anagrams

  • regive

Old French

Verb

grieve

  1. third-person singular present indicative of grever


English

Etymology

From Middle English sorow, sorwe, from Old English sorg, from Proto-West Germanic *sorgu, from Proto-Germanic *surgō (compare West Frisian soarch, Dutch zorg, German Sorge, Danish, Swedish and Norwegian sorg), from Proto-Indo-European *swergʰ- (watch over, worry; be ill, suffer) (compare Old Irish serg (sickness), Tocharian B sark (sickness), Lithuanian sirgti (be sick), Sanskrit सूर्क्षति (sū́rkṣati, worry).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: sŏrʼō, IPA(key): /ˈsɒɹ.əʊ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈsɑɹ.oʊ/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /ˈsɔɹ.oʊ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒɹəʊ

Noun

sorrow (countable and uncountable, plural sorrows)

  1. (uncountable) unhappiness, woe
    • August 28, 1750, Samuel Johnson, The Rambler No. 47
      The safe and general antidote against sorrow is employment.
  2. (countable) (usually in plural) An instance or cause of unhappiness.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

sorrow (third-person singular simple present sorrows, present participle sorrowing, simple past and past participle sorrowed)

  1. (intransitive) To feel or express grief.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, p. 424:
      Sorrow not, sir,’ says he, ‘like those without hope.’
  2. (transitive) To feel grief over; to mourn, regret.

Derived terms

  • besorrow

Translations

References

  • “sorrow” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  • “sorrow” in WordNet 3.0, Princeton University, 2006.

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