grille vs wicket what difference

what is difference between grille and wicket

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French grille.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹɪl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Noun

grille (plural grilles)

  1. Alternative form of grill (only in the senses of “grating over opening” and “grating on the front of a vehicle“)
    • The house was a big elaborate limestone affair, evidently new. Winter sunshine sparkled on lace-hung casement, on glass marquise, and the burnished bronze foliations of grille and door.

Anagrams

  • Giller

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʁij/

Etymology 1

From Middle French grille, grisle, from Old French greille, graïlle, from earlier gradilie (end of 10th century), from Latin crāticula (or a Vulgar Latin graticula).

Noun

grille f (plural grilles)

  1. gate
  2. grate
  3. grid
Derived terms
  • gril
  • grille de départ
  • griller
Descendants
  • English: grille
  • Italian: griglia

Etymology 2

Verb

grille

  1. first-person singular present indicative of griller
  2. third-person singular present indicative of griller
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of griller
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of griller
  5. second-person singular imperative of griller

Further reading

  • “grille” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

German

Verb

grille

  1. inflection of grillen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Limburgish

Alternative forms

  • chrèlle
  • chrille
  • gkrèlle
  • gkrille
  • grèlle

Etymology

Borrowed from Dutch grillen, itself borrowed from English grill. Displaced older steinreustere.

Verb

grille

  1. to grill

Conjugation


Middle English

Etymology

From Old English grel (harsh). Compare German grell (lurid, shrill).

Adjective

grille

  1. gril, harsh, severe
    • c. 1370s. Geoffrey Chaucer, The Romaunt of the Rose. 71-4.
      The briddes, that han left hir song,
      Whyl they han suffred cold so strong
      In wedres grille, and derk to sighte,
      Ben in May, for the sonne brighte,

Descendants

  • English: gril

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

grille (imperative grill, present tense griller, passive grilles, simple past and past participle grilla or grillet, present participle grillende)

  1. to grill (food, in a grill)
  2. (figuratively) to grill (subject someone to intense questioning)

Related terms

  • grill

References

  • “grille” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Spanish

Verb

grille

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of grillar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of grillar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of grillar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of grillar.


English

Etymology

From Anglo-Norman, Old Northern French wiket, from Old Norse (specifically, Old East Norse) víkjas, diminutive of vik. Compare modern French guichet, ultimately from the same Old Norse source.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈwɪkɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪkɪt

Noun

wicket (plural wickets)

  1. A small door or gate, especially one beside a larger one.
  2. A small window or other opening, sometimes fitted with a grating.
    • 1978, Lawrence Durrell, Livia, Faber & Faber 1992 (Avignon Quintet), p. 386:
      As he did so he heard the shuffle of footsteps entering the chapel and the clicking of the confessional wicket.
  3. (Britain) A service window, as in a bank or train station, where a customer conducts transactions with a teller; #* 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
    • Watt climbed the stone steps and stood before the wicket, looking through its bars. He admired the permanent way, stretching away on either hand, in the moonlight, and the starlight, as far as the eye could reach, as far as Watt’s eye could have reached, if it had been inside the station.

a ticket barrier at a rail station, box office at a cinema, etc.

  1. (cricket) One of the two wooden structures at each end of the pitch, consisting of three vertical stumps and two bails; the target for the bowler, defended by the batsman.
  2. (cricket) A dismissal; the act of a batsman getting out.
  3. (cricket) The period during which two batsmen bat together.
  4. (cricket) The pitch.
  5. (cricket) The area around the stumps where the batsmen stand.
  6. (croquet) Any of the small arches through which the balls are driven.
  7. (skiing, snowboarding) A temporary metal attachment that one attaches one’s lift-ticket to.
  8. (US, dialect) A shelter made from tree boughs, used by lumbermen.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bartlett to this entry?)
  9. (mining) The space between the pillars, in post-and-stall working.
  10. (Internet, informal) An angle bracket when used in HTML.
  11. (veterinary) A device to measure the height of animals, usually dogs.

Derived terms

  • on a good wicket
  • sticky wicket
  • wicket gate

Translations

References


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