grim vs stern what difference

what is difference between grim and stern

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹɪm/
  • Rhymes: -ɪm

Etymology 1

From Middle English grim, from Old English grim, grimm, from Proto-West Germanic *grimm, from Proto-Germanic *grimmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrem- (to resound, thunder, grumble, roar). Noun sense derives from adjective, from 1620s.

Adjective

grim (comparative grimmer, superlative grimmest)

  1. dismal and gloomy, cold and forbidding
    Life was grim in many northern industrial towns.
  2. rigid and unrelenting
    His grim determination enabled him to win.
  3. ghastly or sinister
    A grim castle overshadowed the village.
    • 2012 March 22, Scott Tobias, “The Hunger Games”, in AV Club:
      In movie terms, it suggests Paul Verhoeven in Robocop/Starship Troopers mode, an R-rated bloodbath where the grim spectacle of children murdering each other on television is bread-and-circuses for the age of reality TV, enforced by a totalitarian regime to keep the masses at bay.
  4. disgusting; gross
    – Wanna see the dead rat I found in my fridge?
    – Mate, that is grim!
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

grim (plural grims)

  1. (obsolete) specter, ghost, haunting spirit

Verb

grim (third-person singular simple present grims, present participle grimming, simple past and past participle grimmed)

  1. (transitive, rare) To make grim; to give a stern or forbidding aspect to.

Etymology 2

From Middle English grim, grym, greme, from Old English *grimu, *grimmu, from Proto-Germanic *grimmį̄ (anger, wrath), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrem- (to resound, thunder, grumble, roar). Cognate with Middle Dutch grimme, Middle High German grimme f (anger), modern German Grimm m.

Noun

grim (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Anger, wrath.
Derived terms
  • grimful
  • grimless

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɡ̊ʁɛmˀ]

Etymology

From Old Norse grimmr, from Proto-Germanic *grimmaz.

Adjective

grim

  1. ugly, unsightly
  2. nasty

Inflection


Kalasha

Verb

grim

  1. taking

Old English

Alternative forms

  • grimm

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *grimm, from Proto-Germanic *grimmaz.

Cognate with Old Saxon grim, Old High German grim (German grimm, grimmig), Old Norse grimmr (Danish grim, Swedish grym); and with Greek χρεμίζω (chremízo), Old Church Slavonic грьмѣти (grĭměti) (Russian греме́ть (gremétʹ)), Latvian gremt.

Perhaps related in Old Norse to veiled or hooded, Grim is also an alternate name for Odin, who often went around disguised; compare the hooded appearance of The Grim Reaper.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrim/

Adjective

grim

  1. fierce, severe, terrible, savage, cruel, angry

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: grim
    • Scots: grim
    • English: grim


English

Alternative forms

  • sterne (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: stûrn, IPA(key): /stɝn/
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: stûn, IPA(key): /stɜːn/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)n

Etymology 1

From Middle English stern, sterne, sturne, from Old English styrne (stern, grave, strict, austere, hard, severe, cruel), from Proto-Germanic *sturnijaz (angry, astonished, shocked), from Proto-Indo-European *ster- (rigid, stiff). Cognate with Scots stern (bold, courageous, fierce, resolute), Old High German stornēn (to be astonished), Dutch stuurs (glum, austere), Swedish stursk (insolent).

Adjective

stern (comparative sterner, superlative sternest)

  1. Having a hardness and severity of nature or manner.
    • stern as tutors, and as uncles hard
  2. Grim and forbidding in appearance.
    • 1814, William Wordsworth, The Excursion
      these barren rocks, your stern inheritance
Translations

Etymology 2

Most likely from Old Norse stjórn (control, steering), related to stýra (to steer), from Proto-Germanic *stiurijaną, whence also English steer. Also possibly from Old Frisian stiarne (rudder), from the same Germanic root.

Noun

stern (plural sterns)

  1. (nautical) The rear part or after end of a ship or vessel.
  2. (figuratively) The post of management or direction.
  3. The hinder part of anything.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)
  4. The tail of an animal; now used only of the tail of a dog.

Synonyms
  • (of a ship): poop
Antonyms
  • bow
Derived terms
  • from stem to stern
  • sternpost
Translations
See also
  • keel
  • aft

Etymology 3

From a variant of tern.

Noun

stern (plural sterns)

  1. A bird, the black tern.
Translations

Anagrams

  • ‘rents, Ernst, Snert, nerts, rents, snert, terns

Dutch

Etymology

Possibly cognate with Latin sturnus (starling).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɛr/
  • Rhymes: -ɛr

Noun

stern m (plural sterns or sternen, diminutive sterntje n)

  1. tern

Middle English

Noun

stern

  1. Alternative form of sterne

Mòcheno

Etymology

From Middle High German stërne, stërre, stërn, from Old High German sterno, from Proto-Germanic *sternǭ, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂stḗr (star). Cognate with German Stern, English star.

Noun

stern m

  1. star

References

  • Anthony R. Rowley, Liacht as de sproch: Grammatica della lingua mòchena Deutsch-Fersentalerisch, TEMI, 2003.

Old High German

Noun

stern m

  1. Alternative form of sterno

Declension


Piedmontese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɛrŋ/

Noun

stern m

  1. breastbone

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