grinder vs torpedo what difference

what is difference between grinder and torpedo

English

Etymology

From Middle English grinder, grindere, from Old English grindere (one or that which grinds; grinder), equivalent to grind +‎ -er.

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɡɹaɪn.də(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -aɪndə(ɹ)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɡɹaɪndəɹ/

Noun

grinder (plural grinders)

  1. One who grinds something, such as the teeth.
    scissors grinder (one who sharpens scissors)
  2. (anatomy) A molar.
  3. (slang) Any tooth.
  4. A power tool with a spinning abrasive disc, used for grinding, smoothing, and shaping materials, usually metal.
  5. (US, regional, western New England) A sandwich made on a long, cylindrical roll.
    I am going to the deli to get a grinder for lunch.
  6. A kitchen gadget for processing coffee, herbs etc. into small or powdered pieces
  7. The restless flycatcher (Myiagra inquieta) of Australia, which makes a noise like a scissors grinder.
  8. (music, slang) A fan or performer of grindcore music.
  9. (slang) A biohacker who uses cybernetic implants or biochemicals to enhance or change their own body.
  10. (slang, dated) A student who studies hard; a swot.
  11. (slang, dated) A person who coaches students for an upcoming examination.
  12. (ice hockey, slang) A hard-working, physical player with limited offensive ability.
  13. (lawyer slang) A low-ranking attorney with no clients who works very hard.
  14. (US, military, slang) An outdoor space for drills and parades.
    • 2019, Chas Romeo, U.S.M.C.
      We were told then and there that we wouldn’t be allowed on the grinder again until we could do a lot better. The grinder is what that large area was called, and it was a fitting name. They literally ground us down on it.
    • 2013, USMC Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC / TC3) Guidelines
      Company formations are held on the grinder (basketball court outside the Quarterdeck).
  15. (radio, informal) Atmospheric interference producing a roaring background noise.

Usage notes

  • The type of sandwich denoted by grinder varies widely. In the Philadelphia area, for example, a grinder is distinguished from a hoagie in that the grinder is toasted or baked, and usually lacks lettuce.

Synonyms

  • (sandwich): sub

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • (a tooth; one who coaches students): 1873, John Camden Hotten, The Slang Dictionary

Anagrams

  • Girdner, derring, red ring, regrind

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

grinder m or f

  1. indefinite plural of grind

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

grinder f

  1. indefinite plural of grind


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin torpēdō (a torpedo fish; numbness, torpidity, electric ray), from torpeō (I am stiff, numb, torpid; I am astounded; I am inactive) +‎ -ēdō (noun suffix), from Proto-Indo-European *ster- (stiff).

Cognate with Old English steorfan (to die), Ancient Greek στερεός (stereós, solid), Lithuanian tirpstu (to become rigid), Old Church Slavonic трупети (trupeti).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌtɔː(ɹ)ˈpiː.dəʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌtɔɹˈpi.doʊ/
  • Hyphenation: tor‧pe‧do
  • Rhymes: -iːdəʊ

Noun

torpedo (plural torpedoes or torpedos)

  1. An electric ray of the genus Torpedo.
    • 1790, Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Men:
      The man has been changed into an artificial monster by the station in which he is born, and the consequent homage that benumbed his faculties like the torpedo’s touch [] .
  2. (military) A cylindrical explosive projectile that can travel underwater and is used as a weapon.
    1. (science fiction) A similar projectile that can travel through space.
  3. (regional) A submarine sandwich.
  4. (archaic, military) A naval mine.
  5. (obsolete, military) An explosive device buried underground and set off remotely, to destroy fortifications, troops, or cavalry; a land torpedo.
  6. (slang) A professional gunman or assassin.
  7. (rail transport, US) A small explosive device attached to the top of the rail to provide an audible warning when a train passes over it.
  8. A kind of firework in the form of a small ball, or pellet, which explodes when thrown upon a hard object.
  9. An automobile with a torpedo body.
  10. (slang, chiefly US, usually in the plural) A woman’s shoe with a pointed toe. [1910s]
  11. (slang, chiefly US, usually in the plural) A large breast; breast with a large nipple. [from 1960s]
  12. (slang) A marijuana cigarette.
    1. A thick marijuana cigarette. [1940s]
    2. A cigarette containing marijuana and crack cocaine. [from 1980s]

Synonyms

  • (sandwich): see sub
  • (rail transport): detonator (UK)
  • (an explosive underwater projectile): torp (abbreviation), fish

Derived terms

  • torpedo body
  • torpedo roll
  • torpedo stern
  • land torpedo
  • spar torpedo
  • torp (abbreviation)

Related terms

  • torpid

Translations

Verb

torpedo (third-person singular simple present torpedoes, present participle torpedoing, simple past and past participle torpedoed)

  1. To send a torpedo, usually from a submarine, that explodes below the waterline of the target ship.
  2. To sink a ship with one of more torpedoes.
  3. To undermine or destroy any endeavor with a stealthy, powerful attack.

Translations

Anagrams

  • optrode, pet door, toe drop, trooped

Cebuano

Etymology

From English torpedo, borrowed from Latin torpēdō (a torpedo fish; numbness, torpidity, electric ray), from torpeō (I am stiff, numb, torpid; I am astounded; I am inactive) +‎ -ēdō (noun suffix), from Proto-Indo-European *ster- (stiff).

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: tor‧pe‧do

Noun

torpedo

  1. (military) a torpedo; a cylindrical explosive projectile that can travel underwater and is used as a weapon

Dutch

Etymology

From Latin torpēdō (a torpedo fish), from torpēdō (numbness, torpidity, electric ray), from torpeō (I am stiff, numb, torpid; I am astounded; I am inactive) and -dō (noun suffix), from Proto-Indo-European *ster- (stiff), see also Old English steorfan (to die), Ancient Greek στερεός (stereós, solid), Lithuanian tirpstu (to become rigid), Old Church Slavonic трупети (trupeti)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɔrˈpeː.doː/
  • Hyphenation: tor‧pe‧do

Noun

torpedo f or m (plural torpedo’s, diminutive torpedootje n)

  1. A torpedo (projectile adapted for underwater use).
  2. (dated) A low-lying streamlined car.

Derived terms

  • torpedoboot

Related terms

  • torpederen

Esperanto

Etymology

From English torpedo, Spanish torpedo, German Torpedo; all ultimately from Latin torpedo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /torˈpedo/
  • Hyphenation: tor‧pe‧do
  • Rhymes: -edo

Noun

torpedo (accusative singular torpedon, plural torpedoj, accusative plural torpedojn)

  1. torpedo

Derived terms

  • torpedi

Finnish

Alternative forms

  • torpeedo (archaic)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtorpe(ː)do/, [ˈt̪o̞rpe̞(ː)do̞]
  • Rhymes: -orpedo
  • Syllabification: tor‧pe‧do

Noun

torpedo

  1. torpedo (self-propelled cylindrical explosive projectile that can travel underwater)

Declension

Derived terms

  • torpedoida
  • torpedovene

Italian

Noun

torpedo f (invariable)

  1. tourer (motorcar)

See also

  • torpedine

Anagrams

  • deporto, deportò

Latin

Etymology

torpeō (I am stiff or numb) +‎ -ēdō.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /torˈpeː.doː/, [t̪ɔɾˈpeːd̪oː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /torˈpe.do/, [t̪ɔrˈpɛːd̪ɔ]

Noun

torpēdō f (genitive torpēdinis); third declension

  1. lethargy, inertness, sluggishness
  2. torpedo fish

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Descendants

References

  • torpedo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • torpedo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • torpedo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin torpedo, via English torpedo or German Torpedo

Noun

torpedo m (definite singular torpedoen, indefinite plural torpedoer, definite plural torpedoene)

  1. a torpedo

Derived terms

  • torpedere

References

  • “torpedo” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin torpedo, via English torpedo or German Torpedo

Noun

torpedo m (definite singular torpedoen, indefinite plural torpedoar, definite plural torpedoane)

  1. a torpedo

Derived terms

  • torpedere

References

  • “torpedo” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin torpēdō (a torpedo fish), from torpēdō (numbness, torpidity, electric ray), from torpeō (I am stiff, numb, torpid; I am astounded; I am inactive) and -dō (noun suffix). Compare torpor.

Pronunciation

  • (South Brazil) IPA(key): /toɻ.ˈpe.do/

Noun

torpedo m (plural torpedos)

  1. torpedo (submarine weapon)
  2. (Brazil) SMS (a text message sent on a cell phone)

Related terms

  • torpedagem, torpedear, torpedeamento, torpedeiro

Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /torpěːdo/
  • Hyphenation: tor‧pe‧do

Noun

torpédo m (Cyrillic spelling торпе́до)

  1. torpedo

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

From Latin torpēdō (a torpedo fish).

Pronunciation

Noun

torpedo m (plural torpedos)

  1. torpedo (fish)
    Synonyms: raya torpedo, raya negra, raya eléctrica
  2. torpedo (weapon)

Derived terms

  • lanzatorpedos
  • cazatorpedos
  • torpedear

Further reading

  • “torpedo” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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