grinning vs smile what difference

what is difference between grinning and smile

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɹɪnɪŋ/

Verb

grinning

  1. present participle of grin
    I’m grinning because someone told me a joke.

Noun

grinning (countable and uncountable, plural grinnings)

  1. The act or expression of one who grins.
    • 1835, Thomas Babington Macaulay, History (essay in the Edinburgh Review)
      The agitations resembled the grinnings and writhings of a galvanized corpse, not the struggles of an athletic man.


English

Etymology

From Middle English smilen (to smile), from Old Norse smíla (to smile) (compare Danish smile, Swedish smila (to smile)), from Proto-Germanic *smīlijaną, *smirōną (to smile), from Proto-Indo-European *smey- (to laugh, be glad, wonder). Cognate with Saterland Frisian smielje (to smile), Low German smielen (to smile), Dutch smuilen (to smile), Middle High German smielen (to smile). Related also to Old High German smierōn (to smile), Old English smerian (to laugh at), Old English smercian, smearcian (“to smile”; > English smirk), Latin miror (to wonder at).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsmaɪl/, /ˈsmaɪ.əl/
  • Rhymes: -aɪl

Noun

smile (plural smiles)

  1. A facial expression comprised by flexing the muscles of both ends of one’s mouth, often showing the front teeth, without vocalisation, and in humans is a common involuntary or voluntary expression of happiness, pleasure, amusement, goodwill, or anxiety.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:smile
  2. (figuratively) Favour; propitious regard.
  3. (slang, dated) A drink bought by one person for another.
    Synonym: treat

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

smile (third-person singular simple present smiles, present participle smiling, simple past and past participle smiled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To have (a smile) on one’s face.
  2. (transitive) To express by smiling.
  3. (intransitive) To express amusement, pleasure, or love and kindness.
  4. (intransitive) To look cheerful and joyous; to have an appearance suited to excite joy.
  5. (intransitive) To be propitious or favourable; to countenance.

Derived terms

  • smiler

Translations

Anagrams

  • Imels, Liems, Miles, Selim, limes, miles, milse, misle, slime

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse smíla (to smile), from Proto-Germanic *smīlijaną, *smirōną (to smile), from Proto-Indo-European *smey- (to laugh, be glad, wonder).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /smiːlø/, [ˈsmiːˀlə]
  • Rhymes: -iːlə

Verb

smile (imperative smil, infinitive at smile, present tense smiler, past tense smilede, perfect tense har smilet)

  1. to smile

Related terms

  • smil

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

smile (imperative smil, present tense smiler, simple past smilte, past participle smilt, present participle smilende)

  1. to smile
    smile fra øre til øre – grin from ear to ear
    Smil til kameraet. – Smile for the camera.

Related terms

  • smil (noun)

References

  • “smile” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

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