grip vs hairgrip what difference

what is difference between grip and hairgrip

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: grĭp, IPA(key): /ɡɹɪp/
  • Rhymes: -ɪp

Etymology 1

From Middle English grippen, from Old English grippan, from a Proto-Germanic *gripjaną (compare Old High German gripfen); compare the related Old English grīpan, whence English gripe. See also grope, and the related Proto-Germanic *grīpaną.

Verb

grip (third-person singular simple present grips, present participle gripping, simple past and past participle gripped)

  1. (transitive) To take hold of, particularly with the hand.
  2. (transitive) To help or assist, particularly in an emotional sense.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      By and by fumes of brandy began to fill the air, and climb to where I lay, overcoming the mouldy smell of decayed wood and the dampness of the green walls. It may have been that these fumes mounted to my head, and gave me courage not my own, but so it was that I lost something of the stifling fear that had gripped me, and could listen with more ease to what was going forward
  3. (intransitive) To do something with another that makes you happy/gives you relief.
  4. To trench; to drain.
Synonyms
  • (take hold of): clasp, grasp; See also Thesaurus:grasp
  • (help or assist): aid, help out, lend a hand; See also Thesaurus:help
  • (do something happy with another): hang out
  • (trench):
Derived terms
  • begrip
  • gripping
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English grippe, gripe, an amalgam of Old English gripe (grasp, hold) (cognate with German Griff) and Old English gripa (handful) (cognate with Swedish grepp).

Noun

grip (countable and uncountable, plural grips)

  1. A hold or way of holding, particularly with the hand.
  2. A handle or other place to grip.
  3. (computing, graphical user interface) A visual component on a window etc. enabling it to be resized and/or moved.
  4. (film production) A person responsible for handling equipment on the set.
    Hyponym: key grip
    Coordinate terms: gaffer, gofer
  5. A channel cut through a grass verge (especially for the purpose of draining water away from the highway).
  6. (chiefly Southern California slang) A lot of something.
  7. (chiefly Southern California slang) A long time.
  8. Archaic spelling of grippe: Influenza, flu.
    • 1911, Theodore Dreiser, Jennie Gerhardt, Chapter XXXII:
      It so happened that, during a stretch of inclement weather in the fall, Lester was seized with a mild form of grip. When he felt the first symptoms he thought that his indisposition would be a matter of short duration, and tried to overcome it by taking a hot bath and a liberal dose of quinine. But the infection was stronger than he counted on; by morning he was flat on his back, with a severe fever and a splitting headache.
  9. (archaic) A small travelling-bag or gripsack.
  10. An apparatus attached to a car for clutching a traction cable.
  11. Assistance; help or encouragement. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  12. A helpful, interesting, admirable, or inspiring person.
  13. (slang) As much as one can hold in a hand; a handful.
  14. (figuratively) A tenacious grasp; a holding fast.
  15. A device for grasping or holding fast to something.
See also
  • (a lot of) hella, hecka
Related terms
  • come to grips
  • get to grips with
  • key grip
  • get a grip
  • gripper
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English grip, grippe, gryppe (a ditch, drain), from Old English grēp (a furrow, burrow) and grēpe (a furrow, ditch, drain), from Proto-Germanic *grōpiz (a furrow, groove). Cognate with Middle Dutch grippe, gruppe (ditch, drain), greppe, German Low German Gruppe (ditch, drain). Related also to Old English grōp (a ditch, drain). More at groop.

Alternative forms

  • gripe

Noun

grip (plural grips)

  1. (dialectal) A small ditch or trench; a channel to carry off water or other liquid; a drain.
Derived terms
  • gripple

Etymology 4

From Middle English gripe, from Old French gripe, from Latin grypus, gryphus.

Noun

grip (plural grips)

  1. (obsolete) The griffin.

Anagrams

  • IGRP, PIRG, prig

Albanian

Etymology

Probably a modern loanword, from German Grippe.

Noun

grip m

  1. flu, influenza

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from French grippe, from Frankish *grīpan (to seize), from Proto-Germanic *grīpaną.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈɡɾip/

Noun

grip f (plural grips)

  1. flu (influenza)

Further reading

  • “grip” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “grip” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “grip” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “grip” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English grip.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣrɪp/

Noun

grip m (plural grippen, diminutive gripje n)

  1. hold (to ensure control)

Related terms

  • greep
  • griep
  • grijpen
  • begrip

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French grippe (influenza).

Noun

grip

  1. influenza, flu

Icelandic

Noun

grip

  1. inflection of gripur:
    1. indefinite accusative singular
    2. indefinite dative singular

Ladino

Etymology

Borrowed from French grippe (influenza).

Noun

grip f (Latin spelling)

  1. (medicine) influenza, flu

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old French gripe.

Noun

grip

  1. Alternative form of gripe (griffin)

Etymology 2

From Old English grēp.

Noun

grip

  1. Alternative form of grippe

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

grip

  1. imperative of gripe

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

grip

  1. present tense of gripa and gripe
  2. imperative of gripa and gripe

Romansch

Noun

grip m (plural grips)

  1. rock

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡriːp/
  • Rhymes: -iːp

Noun

grip c

  1. griffin

Declension

Verb

grip

  1. imperative of gripa.

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from French grippe.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɾip/

Noun

grip (definite accusative gripi, plural gripler)

  1. (pathology) flu, influenza, grippe

Yola

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

grip (plural gripès)

  1. stitch

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith


English

Etymology

hair +‎ grip

Pronunciation

Alternative forms

  • hair-grip, hair grip

Noun

hairgrip (plural hairgrips)

  1. A flat hairpin having two prongs that hold bobbed hair together.

Synonyms

  • bobby pin
  • grip
  • kirby grip

Translations


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