gripe vs kick what difference

what is difference between gripe and kick

English

Etymology

From Middle English gripen, from Old English grīpan, from Proto-Germanic *grīpaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰreyb- (to grab, grasp). Cognate with West Frisian gripe, Low German griepen, Dutch grijpen, German greifen, Danish gribe, Swedish gripa. See also grip, grope.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹaɪp/
  • Rhymes: -aɪp

Verb

gripe (third-person singular simple present gripes, present participle griping, simple past griped or (obsolete) grope, past participle griped or (obsolete) gripen)

  1. (intransitive, informal) To complain; to whine.
  2. (transitive, informal) To annoy or bother.
    What’s griping you?
  3. (nautical) To tend to come up into the wind, as a ship which, when sailing close-hauled, requires constant labour at the helm.
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To pinch; to distress. Specifically, to cause pinching and spasmodic pain to the bowels of, as by the effects of certain purgative or indigestible substances.
  5. (intransitive) To suffer griping pains.
  6. (obsolete, intransitive) To make a grab (to, towards, at or upon something).
  7. (archaic, transitive) To seize or grasp.
    • 1551, Ralph Robinson (sometimes spelt Raphe Robynson) (translator), Utopia (originally written by Sir Thomas More)
      Wouldst thou gripe both gain and pleasure?
    • 1667, Richard Allestree, The Causes of the Decay of Christian Piety
      Unclutch his griping hand.

Synonyms

  • (complain): bitch (vulgar), complain, whine, whinge

Derived terms

  • begripe

Translations

Noun

gripe (plural gripes)

  1. A complaint, often a petty or trivial one.
  2. (nautical) A wire rope, often used on davits and other life raft launching systems.
  3. (obsolete) grasp; clutch; grip
    • 1764, Horace Walpole, The Castle of Otranto, I:
      The young peasant […] disengaged himself from Manfred’s gripe […].
    • 1833, Mary Shelley, The Mortal Immortal
      I started — I dropped the glass — the fluid flamed and glanced along the floor, while I felt Cornelius’s gripe at my throat, as he shrieked aloud, “Wretch! you have destroyed the labour of my life!”
  4. (obsolete) That which is grasped; a handle; a grip.
    the gripe of a sword
  5. (engineering, dated) A device for grasping or holding anything; a brake to stop a wheel.
  6. (obsolete) Oppression; cruel exaction; affliction; pinching distress.
    • 1785, William Cowper, “The Garden”, in The Task, a Poem, in Six Books. By William Cowper [] To which are Added, by the Same Author, An Epistle to Joseph Hill, Esq. Tirocinium, or a Review of Schools, and The History of John Gilpin, London: Printed for J[oseph] Johnson, No. 72 St. Paul’s Church-Yard, OCLC 221351486; republished as The Task. A Poem. In Six Books. To which is Added, Tirocinium: or, A Review of Schools, new edition, Philadelphia, Pa.: Printed for Thomas Dobson, bookseller, in Second-street, second door above Chestnut-street, 1787, OCLC 23630717, page 87:
      ‘Tis the cruel gripe, / That lean hard-handed poverty inflicts, / The hope of better things, the chance to win, / The wiſh to ſhine, the thirſt to be amus’d, / That at the found of Winter’s hoary wing, / Unpeople all our counties, of ſuch herds, / Of flutt’ring, loit’ring, cringing, begging, looſe, / And wanton vagrants, as make London, vaſt / And boundless as it is, a crowded coop.
  7. (chiefly in the plural) Pinching and spasmodic pain in the intestines.
  8. (nautical) The piece of timber that terminates the keel at the fore end; the forefoot.
  9. (nautical) The compass or sharpness of a ship’s stern under the water, having a tendency to make her keep a good wind.
  10. (nautical) An assemblage of ropes, dead-eyes, and hocks, fastened to ringbolts in the deck, to secure the boats when hoisted.
  11. (obsolete) A vulture, Gyps fulvus; the griffin.

Derived terms

  • gripe water

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Greip, Griep

Galician

Etymology

Attested since 1853. From French grippe

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡɾipɪ]

Noun

gripe m or f (plural gripes)

  1. (pathology) flu, influenza
    Synonyms: gripallada, gripalleira, gripaxe

Derived terms

  • gripallada
  • gripalleira
  • gripar
  • gripaxe
  • gripo
  • gripio

References

  • “gripe” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI – ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “gripe” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “gripe” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Middle English

Etymology 1

Verb

gripe

  1. Alternative form of gripen

Etymology 2

From Old English gripe, from Proto-Germanic *gripiz.

Alternative forms

  • grippe, grype, grepe

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡrip(ə)/, /ˈɡreːp(ə)/

Noun

gripe (plural grippes or gripen)

  1. Gripping, taking, or grabbing; taking with one’s hand.
  2. (rare) A small group or collection of things.
  3. (rare) An assailing; an offensive strike.
Related terms
  • gripel
Descendants
  • English: grip
  • Scots: grip, grup
References
  • “grip(e, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-11-22.

Etymology 3

Borrowed from Old French gripe, from Latin gryps, grȳphus, from Ancient Greek γρῡ́ψ (grū́ps).

Alternative forms

  • grippe, grype, gryyp, grijp, grip, gryp

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡrip(ə)/, /ˈɡriːp(ə)/

Noun

gripe (plural gripes)

  1. A griffin (mythological beast; also in heraldry).
  2. A vulture (compare modern English griffon vulture).
Descendants
  • English: grip (obsolete)
References
  • “grī̆p(e, n.(3).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-11-22.

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian gripa, which derives from Proto-Germanic *grīpaną.

Verb

gripe

  1. (Mooring) to grab, seize

Conjugation


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse grípa (to grab), from Proto-Germanic *grīpaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰreyb- (to grasp, grab). Cognate with Danish gribe, Swedish gripa, Icelandic grípa, English gripe, Dutch grijpen, German greifen.

Verb

gripe (imperative grip, present tense griper, simple past grep or greip, past participle grepet, present participle gripende)

  1. to grab, grasp, grip
  2. to seize (grab, capture).
  3. to seize (take advantage of an opportunity).

Derived terms

Related terms

  • grep

References

  • “gripe” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²ɡriːpə/ (example of pronunciation)

Verb

gripe (present tense grip, past tense greip, past participle gripe, passive infinitive gripast, present participle gripande, imperative grip)

  1. Alternative form of gripa

Derived terms

  • gripe dagen
  • gripe inn

Old English

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *gripiz. Cognate with Old High German grif- (German Griff), Old Norse gripr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡri.pe/

Noun

gripe m (nominative plural gripe or gripas)

  1. grip, clutch, grasp
Declension
Descendants
  • English: grip

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • grīpe: IPA(key): /ˈɡriː.pe/
  • gripe: IPA(key): /ˈɡri.pe/

Verb

grīpe

  1. inflection of grīpan:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. singular present subjunctive

Verb

gripe

  1. inflection of grīpan:
    1. second-person singular past indicative
    2. singular past subjunctive

Portuguese

Alternative forms

  • grippe (obsolete)

Noun

gripe f (plural gripes)

  1. The flu, influenza.

Verb

gripe

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of gripar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of gripar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of gripar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of gripar

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡripe]

Noun

gripe f pl

  1. indefinite plural of gripă
  2. indefinite genitive/dative singular of gripă

Spanish

Alternative forms

  • gripa (Colombia, Mexico)

Etymology

Borrowed from French grippe, from gripper (to seize), of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɾipe/, [ˈɡɾi.pe]

Noun

gripe f (plural gripes)

  1. (medicine) flu, influenza
    Synonym: influenza
    Tengo la gripe / Tengo gripe
    I have (the) flu.

Derived terms

  • antigripal
  • agriparse
  • gripe aviar
  • gripe española
  • gripe porcina

Anagrams

  • pigre

Further reading

  • “gripe” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian grīpa, from Proto-Germanic *grīpaną.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡripə/

Verb

gripe

  1. to grab, to grasp

Inflection

Derived terms

  • begripe

Further reading

  • “gripe (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɪk/, [kʰɪk]
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Etymology 1

From Middle English kiken (to strike out with the foot), from Old Norse kikna (to sink at the knees) and keikja (to bend backwards) (compare Old Norse keikr (bent backwards, the belly jutting forward)), from Proto-Germanic *kaikaz (bent backwards), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Proto-Germanic *kī-, *kij- (to split, dodge, swerve sidewards), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵeyH- (to sprout, shoot). Compare also Dutch kijken (to look), Middle Low German kīken (to look, watch). See keek.

Verb

kick (third-person singular simple present kicks, present participle kicking, simple past and past participle kicked)

  1. (transitive) To strike or hit with the foot or other extremity of the leg.
    Did you kick your brother?
    • 1895, George MacDonald, Lilith, Chapter XII: Friends and Foes,
      I was cuffed by the women and kicked by the men because I would not swallow it.
    • 1905, Fielding H. Yost, Football for Player and Spectator, Chapter 6,
      A punt is made by letting the ball drop from the hands and kicking it just before it touches the ground.
    • 1919, Sherwood Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio, The Teacher: concerning Kate Swift,
      Will Henderson, who had on a light overcoat and no overshoes, kicked the heel of his left foot with the toe of the right.
  2. (intransitive) To make a sharp jerking movement of the leg, as to strike something.
    He enjoyed the simple pleasure of watching the kickline kick.
    • 1877, Anna Sewell, Black Beauty, Chapter 1: My Early Home
      Sometimes we had rather rough play, for they would frequently bite and kick as well as gallop.
    • 1904, Stratemeyer Syndicate, The Bobbsey Twins, Chapter II: Rope Jumping, and What Followed,
      “If you did that, I’d kick,” answered Freddie, and began to kick real hard into the air.
  3. (transitive) To direct to a particular place by a blow with the foot or leg.
    Kick the ball into the goal.
    • 1905, Fielding H. Yost, Football for Player and Spectator, Chapter 7,
      Sometimes he can kick the ball forward along the ground until it is kicked in goal, where he can fall on it for a touchdown.
  4. (with “off” or “out”) To eject summarily.
    • 1936 October, Robert E. Howard, The Conquerin’ Hero of the Humbolts, published in Action Stories
      “He’s been mad at me ever since I fired him off’n my payroll. After I kicked him off’n my ranch he run for sheriff, and the night of the election everybody was so drunk they voted for him by mistake, or for a joke, or somethin’, and since he’s been in office he’s been lettin’ the sheepmen steal me right out of house and home.”
    • 1976 February 3, Bill Gates, An Open Letter to Hobbyists,
      They are the ones who give hobbyists a bad name, and should be kicked out of any club meeting they show up at.
  5. (intransitive, Internet) To forcibly remove a participant from an online activity.
    He was kicked by ChanServ for flooding.
  6. (transitive, slang) To overcome (a bothersome or difficult issue or obstacle); to free oneself of (a problem).
    I still smoke, but they keep telling me to kick the habit.
  7. To move or push suddenly and violently.
    He was kicked sideways by the force of the blast.
    • 2011, Tom Andry, Bob Moore: No Hero
      The back of the car kicked out violently, forcing me to steer into the slide and accelerate in order to maintain control.
  8. (of a firearm) To recoil; to push by recoiling.
    • 2003, Jennifer C. D. Groomes, The Falcon Project, page 174,
      Lying on the ground, when fired, it kicked me back a foot. There was no way a person my size was going to be able to do an effective job with this gun.
    • 2006, Daniel D. Scherschel, Maple Grove, page 81,
      I asked my sister Jeanette if she wanted to shoot the 12 ga. shotgun. She replied, “does it kick“?
  9. (chess, transitive) To attack (a piece) in order to force it to move.
  10. (intransitive, cycling) To accelerate quickly with a few pedal strokes in an effort to break away from other riders.
    Contador kicks again to try to rid himself of Rasmussen.
  11. (intransitive) To show opposition or resistance.
  12. (printing, historical) To work a press by impact of the foot on a treadle.
Descendants
  • German: kicken
  • Welsh: cicio
Translations

Noun

kick (plural kicks)

  1. A hit or strike with the leg, foot or knee.
    A kick to the knee.
    • 1890, Jacob Riis, How the Other Half Lives, Chapter VII: A Raid on the Stable-Beer Dives,
      A kick of his boot-heel sent the door flying into the room.
    • 2011, Phil McNulty, Euro 2012: Montenegro 2-2 England [1]
      Elsad Zverotic gave Montenegro hope with a goal with the last kick of the first half – and when Rooney was deservedly shown red by referee Wolfgang Stark, England were placed under pressure they could not survive.
  2. The action of swinging a foot or leg.
    The ballerina did a high kick and a leap.
  3. (colloquial) Something that tickles the fancy; something fun or amusing.
    I finally saw the show. What a kick!
    I think I sprained something on my latest exercise kick.
  4. (Internet) The removal of a person from an online activity.
  5. (figuratively) Any bucking motion of an object that lacks legs or feet.
    The car had a nasty kick the whole way.
    The pool ball took a wild kick, up off the table.
  6. (uncountable and countable) Piquancy.
    • 2002, Ellen and Michael Albertson, Temptations, Fireside, →ISBN, page 124 [2]:
      Add a little cascabel pepper to ordinary tomato sauce to give it a kick.
    • 2003, Sheree Bykofsky and Megan Buckley, Sexy City Cocktails, Adams Media, →ISBN, page 129 [3]:
      For extra kick, hollow out a lime, float it on top of the drink, and fill it with tequila.
    • 2007 August 27, Anthony Lane, “Lone Sailors”, The New Yorker, volume 83, Issues 22-28
      The first time I saw “Deep Water,” the trace of mystery in the Crowhurst affair gave the movie a kick of excitement.
  7. A stimulation provided by an intoxicating substance.
  8. (soccer) A pass played by kicking with the foot.
  9. (soccer) The distance traveled by kicking the ball.
    a long kick up the field.
  10. A recoil of a gun.
  11. (informal) Pocket.
  12. An increase in speed in the final part of a running race.
  13. (film, television) Synonym of kicker (backlight positioned at an angle)
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:kick.
Descendants
  • German: Kick
  • Irish: cic
Translations

Derived terms

Etymology 2

Shortening of kick the bucket.

Verb

kick (third-person singular simple present kicks, present participle kicking, simple past and past participle kicked)

  1. (intransitive) To die.

Etymology 3

Shortening of kick ass

Verb

kick (third-person singular simple present kicks, present participle kicking, simple past and past participle kicked)

  1. (slang, intransitive) To be emphatically excellent.
    That band really kicks.

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Etymology 1

Borrowing from English kick.

Noun

kick m (plural kicks)

  1. kick, thrill (something that excites or gives pleasure)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

kick

  1. first-person singular present indicative of kicken
  2. imperative of kicken

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [kɪk]
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Verb

kick

  1. singular imperative of kicken
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of kicken

Yola

Verb

kick

  1. Alternative form of kink

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