grit vs gritstone what difference

what is difference between grit and gritstone

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɹɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1

With early modern vowel shortening, from Middle English grete, griet, from Old English grēot, from Proto-Germanic *greutą (compare German Grieß, Swedish gryta, Norwegian Nynorsk grjot), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰr-eu-d- (compare Lithuanian grúodas (frost; frozen street dirt), Serbo-Croatian grȕda (lump)).

Noun

grit (uncountable)

  1. A collection of hard small materials, such as dirt, ground stone, debris from sandblasting or other such grinding, or swarf from metalworking.
    1. Sand or a sand–salt mixture spread on wet and, especially, icy roads and footpaths to improve traction.
  2. Inedible particles in food.
  3. A measure of the relative coarseness of an abrasive material such as sandpaper, the smaller the number the coarser the abrasive.
  4. (geology) A hard, coarse-grained siliceous sandstone; gritstone. Also, a finer sharp-grained sandstone, e.g., grindstone grit.
  5. Strength of mind; great courage or fearlessness; fortitude.
    • 1861, Charles Reade, The Cloister and the Hearth
      They came to a rising ground , not sharp , but long ; and here youth and grit and sober living told more than ever.
Derived terms
  • gritten
  • gritty
Related terms
  • grind
  • grindstone
  • sand, sandy, sandblasting
Translations
See also
  • debris
  • mortar and pestle
  • swarf

Verb

grit (third-person singular simple present grits, present participle gritting, simple past and past participle gritted or (nonstandard) grit)

  1. Apparently only in grit one’s teeth: to clench, particularly in reaction to pain or anger.
  2. To cover with grit.
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To give forth a grating sound, like sand under the feet; to grate; to grind.
    • 1767, Oliver Goldsmith, The Hermit
      The sanded |floor that grits beneath the tread.
Derived terms
  • grit one’s teeth
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English gryt (bran, chaff), from Old English grytt, from Proto-Germanic *grutją (coarsely ground bits) (compare Dutch grut, German Grütze), ablaut variant of Proto-Indo-European *gʰr-eu-d-. See above.

Noun

grit (plural grits)

  1. (usually in the plural) Husked but unground oats.
  2. (usually in the plural) Coarsely ground corn or hominy used as porridge.
Related terms
  • groat
  • grout
  • gruel
Translations

Anagrams

  • girt, trig

Scots

Adjective

grit (comparative mair grit, superlative maist grit)

  1. great


English

Etymology

grit +‎ stone

Noun

gritstone (countable and uncountable, plural gritstones)

  1. A form of sedimentary rock, similar to sandstone but coarser.

See also

  • gritstone on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • rosetting

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