grizzle vs whine what difference

what is difference between grizzle and whine

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɹɪzəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪzəl

Etymology 1

From Middle English grisel, gryselle, from Old French grisel, from gris (grey), from Frankish *grīs, from Proto-Germanic *grīsaz.

Noun

grizzle (plural grizzles)

  1. A dark grey colour.
  2. Grey hair.
  3. A grey wig.

Translations

Related terms
  • grizzly

Adjective

grizzle

  1. Of a grey colour.

Verb

grizzle (third-person singular simple present grizzles, present participle grizzling, simple past and past participle grizzled)

  1. To make or become grey, as with age.
    • R. F. Burton
      hardship of the way such as would grizzle little children
    • Pall Mall Magazine
      I found myself on the Nubian desert shaking hands with a grizzling man whom men addressed as Collins Bey.

Translations

Etymology 2

From English West Country dialect.

Verb

grizzle (third-person singular simple present grizzles, present participle grizzling, simple past and past participle grizzled)

  1. to cry continuously but not very loudly – especially of a young child.
  2. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand, slang) To whinge or whine.
    • 1888, William S. Gilbert (librettist), The Yeomen of the Guard, The Complete Plays of Gilbert and Sullivan, page 510,
      [Wilfred:] In tears, eh? What a plague art thou grizzling for now?
    • 2009, Judy Waite, Game Girls, unnumbered page,
      The pin-thin girl is grizzling, whining that she has sand in her eyes.
  3. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand, slang) To fuss or cry

Translations

Related terms
  • grizzler

See also

  • Appendix:Colors

References



English

Etymology

From Middle English whynen, hwinen, whinen, from Old English hwīnan (to rush, to whizz, to squeal, to whine), from Proto-West Germanic *hwīnan, from Proto-Germanic *hwīnaną, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱwey- (to hiss, whistle, whisper). Cognate with Old Norse hvína, whence Icelandic hvína, Norwegian hvine, Swedish vina, and Danish hvine.

Despite the strong similarity in sound and meaning, not related with German weinen, Dutch wenen, from Proto-Germanic *wainōną.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: wīn, IPA(key): /waɪn/, [ʍaɪ̯n], [ʍʌɪ̯n], [ʍäːn], [ʍɑe̯n]
  • (without the winewhine merger) enPR: hwīn, IPA(key): /ʍaɪn/
  • Rhymes: -aɪn
  • Homophone: wine (accents with the wine-whine merger)

Noun

whine (plural whines)

  1. A long-drawn, high-pitched complaining cry or sound.
  2. A complaint or criticism.

Translations

Verb

whine (third-person singular simple present whines, present participle whining, simple past and past participle whined)

  1. (intransitive) To utter a high-pitched cry.
  2. (intransitive) To make a sound resembling such a cry.
    The jet engines whined at take off.
  3. (intransitive) To complain or protest with a whine or as if with a whine.
  4. (intransitive) To move with a whining sound.
  5. (transitive) To utter with the sound of a whine.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:complain

Translations


Middle English

Verb

whine

  1. Alternative form of whynen

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