grizzle vs yammer what difference

what is difference between grizzle and yammer

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɹɪzəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪzəl

Etymology 1

From Middle English grisel, gryselle, from Old French grisel, from gris (grey), from Frankish *grīs, from Proto-Germanic *grīsaz.

Noun

grizzle (plural grizzles)

  1. A dark grey colour.
  2. Grey hair.
  3. A grey wig.

Translations

Related terms
  • grizzly

Adjective

grizzle

  1. Of a grey colour.

Verb

grizzle (third-person singular simple present grizzles, present participle grizzling, simple past and past participle grizzled)

  1. To make or become grey, as with age.
    • R. F. Burton
      hardship of the way such as would grizzle little children
    • Pall Mall Magazine
      I found myself on the Nubian desert shaking hands with a grizzling man whom men addressed as Collins Bey.

Translations

Etymology 2

From English West Country dialect.

Verb

grizzle (third-person singular simple present grizzles, present participle grizzling, simple past and past participle grizzled)

  1. to cry continuously but not very loudly – especially of a young child.
  2. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand, slang) To whinge or whine.
    • 1888, William S. Gilbert (librettist), The Yeomen of the Guard, The Complete Plays of Gilbert and Sullivan, page 510,
      [Wilfred:] In tears, eh? What a plague art thou grizzling for now?
    • 2009, Judy Waite, Game Girls, unnumbered page,
      The pin-thin girl is grizzling, whining that she has sand in her eyes.
  3. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand, slang) To fuss or cry

Translations

Related terms
  • grizzler

See also

  • Appendix:Colors

References



English

Etymology

Probably from Middle Dutch jammeren. Cognate with and reinforced by Middle English yeoumeren (to mourn, complain), from Old English ġeōmrian (to lament), from ġeōmor (sorrowful), from Proto-West Germanic [Term?], from Proto-Germanic *jēmaraz (miserable, sorrowful), from Proto-Indo-European *yem- (to hold, match, defeat). Akin to German jammern.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈjæm.ə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈjæm.ɚ/
  • Rhymes: -æmə(r)

Verb

yammer (third-person singular simple present yammers, present participle yammering, simple past and past participle yammered)

  1. (intransitive) To complain peevishly.
  2. (intransitive) To talk loudly and persistently.
  3. (transitive) To repeat on and on, usually loudly or in complaint.
  4. (intransitive, rare) To make an outcry; to clamor.
    • 1951, Isaac Asimov, Foundation (1974 Panther Books Ltd publication), part V: “The Merchant Princes”, chapter 17, page 182, ¶ 1
      It was a ship, but a whale to the Dark Nebula’s minnow; and on its side was the Spaceship-and-Sun of the Empire. Every alarm on the ship yammered hysterically.

Synonyms

  • (complain): whine, grumble
  • (repeat): prattle, babble, yak
  • See also Thesaurus:complain

Translations

Noun

yammer (uncountable)

  1. The act or noise of yammering.
    • 1999, J. M. Coetzee, Disgrace, Penguin, 2000, Chapter Eight, pp. 72-73,
      The house is just as he had imagined it would be: rubbishy furniture, a clutter of ornaments (porcelain shepherdesses, cowbells, an ostrich-feather flywhisk), the yammer of the radio, the cheeping of birds in cages, cats everywhere underfoot.
  2. A loud noise.
    • 1943, R. Sidney Bown, Dave Dawson with the Flying Tigers, Akron, Ohio: Saalfield Publishing Company, Chapter Twelve,[1]
      The ungodly scream of Jap wings in the wind, and the blood-chilling snarl and yammer of their aerial machine gun and aerial cannon fire was enough to make the very ground shake and tremble.
  3. One who yammers.

Translations

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “yammer”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • “yammer” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.

Scots

Verb

yammer (third-person singular present yammers, present participle yammerin, past yammert, past participle yammert)

  1. (intransitive) to lament
  2. (intransitive) to yearn for something

Noun

yammer (uncountable)

  1. a cry of lamentation
  2. the act of yammerin

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