groan vs moan what difference

what is difference between groan and moan

English

Etymology

From Middle English gronen, from Old English grānian (to groan; lament; murmur), from Proto-West Germanic *grīnan, from Proto-Germanic *grainōną (to howl; weep), from Proto-Germanic *grīnaną (to whine; howl; whimper).

Cognate with Dutch grijnen, grienen (to cry; sob; blubber), German Low German grienen (to whimper; mewl), German greinen (to whine; whimper), Swedish grina (to howl; weep; laugh).

The noun is from Middle English gron, grone, from the verb.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɡɹəʊn/
  • (General American) enPR: ʹgrōn, IPA(key): /ɡɹoʊn/
  • Homophone: grown
  • Rhymes: -əʊn

Noun

groan (plural groans)

  1. A low, mournful sound uttered in pain or grief.
  2. A low, guttural sound uttered in frustration, disapproval, or ecstasy.
  3. Of an object: a low creaking sound from applied pressure or weight.

Alternative forms

  • groane (obsolete)

Translations

Verb

groan (third-person singular simple present groans, present participle groaning, simple past and past participle groaned)

  1. To make a groan.
  2. (obsolete) To strive after earnestly, as if with groans.
    • Nothing but holy, pure, and clear, / Or that which groaneth to be so.

Alternative forms

  • groane (obsolete)

Translations

Anagrams

  • Angor, Garon, Goran, Grano, Ongar, Ragon, Rogan, Ronga, angor, argon, nagor, orang, organ, rag on, rango


English

Etymology

From Middle English mone, mane, mān, (also as mene), from Old English *mān, *mǣn (complaint; lamentation), from Proto-West Germanic *mainu, from Proto-Germanic *mainō (opinion; mind).

Cognate with Old Frisian mēne (opinion), Old High German meina (opinion). Old English *mān, *mǣn is inferred from Old English mǣnan (to complain over; grieve; mourn). More at mean.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /məʊn/
  • (US) IPA(key): /moʊn/
  • Rhymes: -əʊn
  • Homophone: mown

Noun

moan (plural moans)

  1. a low, mournful cry of pain, sorrow or pleasure

Translations

Verb

moan (third-person singular simple present moans, present participle moaning, simple past and past participle moaned)

  1. (transitive, now rare) To complain about; to bemoan, to bewail; to mourn. [from 13th c.]
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, VI.7:
      Much did the Craven seeme to mone his case […].
    • 1708, Matthew Prior, the Turtle and the Sparrow
      Ye floods, ye woods, ye echoes, moan / My dear Columbo, dead and gone.
  2. (intransitive, now chiefly poetic) To grieve. [from 14th c.]
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To distress (someone); to sadden. [15th-17th c.]
    • which infinitely moans me
  4. (intransitive) To make a moan or similar sound. [from 18th c.]
  5. (transitive) To say in a moan, or with a moaning voice. [from 19th c.]
    ‘Please don’t leave me,’ he moaned.
  6. (intransitive, colloquial) To complain; to grumble. [from 20th c.]

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:complain

Derived terms

  • moaner
  • moany

Related terms

  • bemoan

Translations

See also

  • murmur
  • protest
  • lament

Further reading

  • moan in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • moan in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Amon, Mano, Mona, NOMA, Noam, Oman, Onam, mano, maon, mona, noma

Breton

Alternative forms

  • moen

Etymology

From Middle Breton moen, from Old Breton moin, from Proto-Brythonic *muɨn (beautiful). Compare Welsh mwyn (mild, gentle)), Irish maoin (property, riches)), Latin mūnis (obliging), Old English mǣne (common)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmwãːn/

Adjective

moan

  1. thin, slender
    Synonym: tanav
    Antonym: tev

Mutation


Finnish

Noun

moan

  1. Genitive singular form of moa.

Anagrams

  • Oman, oman

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial