groin vs inguen what difference

what is difference between groin and inguen

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹɔɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪn
  • Homophone: groyne

Etymology 1

From earlier grine, from Middle English grinde, grynde, from Old English grynde (abyss) (perhaps also “depression, hollow”), probably related to Proto-Germanic *grunduz; see ground. Later altered under the influence of loin.

Noun

groin (plural groins)

  1. The crease or depression of the human body at the junction of the trunk and the thigh, together with the surrounding region.
  2. The area adjoining this fold or depression.
    He pulled a muscle in his groin.
  3. (architecture) The projecting solid angle formed by the meeting of two vaults
  4. (euphemistic) The genitals.
    He got kicked in the groin and was writhing in pain.
  5. (geometry) The surface formed by two such vaults.
Coordinate terms
  • inguinal
Translations

Verb

groin (third-person singular simple present groins, present participle groining, simple past and past participle groined)

  1. To deliver a blow to the genitals of.
    In the scrum he somehow got groined.
    She groined him and ran to the car.
  2. (architecture) To build with groins.
  3. (literary) To hollow out, to excavate.
    ‘Down some profound dull tunnel, long since scooped / Through granites which titanic wars had groined.’ (From Strange Meeting by Wilfred Owen).

Etymology 2

From Middle English groynen, from a mixture of Old French groignier, grougnier (from Latin grunniō) and Old English grunnian (from Proto-Germanic *grunnōną).

Verb

groin (third-person singular simple present groins, present participle groining, simple past and past participle groined)

  1. To grunt; to growl; to snarl; to murmur.
    • c. 1515–1516, published 1568, John Skelton, Againſt venemous tongues enpoyſoned with ſclaunder and falſe detractions &c.:
      Such tunges ſhuld be torne out by the harde rootes,
      Hoyning like hogges that groynis and wrotes.

Etymology 3

Noun

groin (plural groins)

  1. Alternative spelling of groyne

Anagrams

  • Gorin, O-ring, Ringo, giron

French

Etymology

From Old French groign, from Late Latin grunium.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʁwɛ̃/

Noun

groin m (plural groins)

  1. the snout of the pig

Further reading

  • “groin” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • giron

Middle English

Noun

groin

  1. Alternative form of groyn


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin inguen.

Noun

inguen (plural inguens)

  1. (anatomy) The groin.
    • 1909, Transactions of the third International Sanitary Conference of the American Republics
      Ganglions of the right and of the left inguens []

Anagrams

  • gunnie, ingenu

Latin

Alternative forms

  • (Late Latin) inguina

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *h₁n̥gʷ-en-, related to Ancient Greek ἀδήν (adḗn) and Old Norse ökkvinn.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈin.ɡʷen/, [ˈɪŋɡʷɛn]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈin.ɡwen/, [ˈiŋɡwɛn]

Noun

inguen n (genitive inguinis); third declension

  1. (anatomy) groin
  2. privates (sexual organs)

Declension

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Derived terms

  • inguinālis

Descendants

References

  • inguen in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • inguen in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • inguen in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

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