groove vs vallecula what difference

what is difference between groove and vallecula

English

Etymology

From Middle English grov, grove, groof, grofe (cave; pit; mining shaft), from Old English grōf (trench, furrow, something dug), from Proto-Germanic *grōbō (groove, furrow), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrebʰ- (to dig, scrape, bury). Cognate with Dutch groef, groeve (groove; pit, grave), German Grube (ditch, pit), Norwegian grov (brook, riverbed), Serbo-Croatian grèbati (scratch, dig). Directly descended from Old English grafan (to dig). More at grave.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɡɹuːv/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɡɹuv/
  • Rhymes: -uːv

Noun

groove (plural grooves)

  1. A long, narrow channel or depression; e.g., such a slot cut into a hard material to provide a location for an engineering component, a tyre groove, or a geological channel or depression.
    Antonym: ridge
  2. A fixed routine.
    • 1873, John Morley, Rousseau
      The gregarious trifling of life in the social groove.
  3. The middle of the strike zone in baseball where a pitch is most easily hit.
  4. (music) A pronounced, enjoyable rhythm.
  5. (mining) A shaft or excavation.
  6. (motor racing) A racing line, a path across the racing circuit’s surface that a racecar will usually track on. (Note: There may be multiple grooves on any particular circuit or segment of circuit)

Derived terms

  • get one’s groove on
  • groove fricative
  • grooveless
  • groovelike
  • groovework
  • groovy
  • tongue and groove

Translations

Verb

groove (third-person singular simple present grooves, present participle grooving, simple past and past participle grooved)

  1. (transitive) To cut a groove or channel in; to form into channels or grooves; to furrow.
  2. (intransitive) To perform, dance to, or enjoy rhythmic music.
    I was just starting to groove to the band when we had to leave.

Derived terms

  • grooved
  • groover
  • ungrooved

Translations

Anagrams

  • go over, overgo

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʁuv/

Noun

groove m (plural grooves)

  1. groove (fixed routine)

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English.

Noun

groove m (plural grooves)

  1. groove (music style)


English

Etymology

1859 borrowing from Late Latin vallecula (a little valley, glen, dell), diminutive of vallēs (a valley, vale).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /vaˈlɛk.jʊl.ə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /væˈlɛk.jəl.ə/, /vəˈlɛk.jəl.ə/
  • Rhymes: -ɛkjʊlə

Noun

vallecula (plural valleculae or valleculas)

  1. (anatomy, botany) A depression, channel or groove.

Derived terms

  • vallecular
  • valleculate

References

  • “vallecula”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • “vallecula”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  • “vallecula”, in Dorland’s Illustrated Medical Dictionary, Saunders, 2004

Anagrams

  • call value

Latin

Etymology

From vallēs (a valley, vale) +‎ -cula (diminutive nominal suffix).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /u̯alˈle.ku.la/, [u̯älˈlʲɛkʊɫ̪ä]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /valˈle.ku.la/, [vɑlˈlɛːkulɑ]

Noun

vallecula f (genitive valleculae); first declension

  1. Diminutive of vallēs: Late Latin form of vallicula.

Descendants

  • English: vallecula

References

  • vallicula in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press

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