ground vs land what difference

what is difference between ground and land

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ɡɹaʊnd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnd

Etymology 1

From Middle English grounde, from Old English grund, from Proto-Germanic *grunduz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰr̥mtu-. Cognate with West Frisian grûn, Dutch grond and German Grund. Non-Germanic cognates include Albanian grundë (brittle earth).

Alternative forms

  • GND (contraction used in electronics)

Noun

ground (countable and uncountable, plural grounds)

  1. The surface of the Earth, as opposed to the sky or water or underground.
    • Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. [] Frills, ruffles, flounces, lace, complicated seams and gores: not only did they sweep the ground and have to be held up in one hand elegantly as you walked along, but they had little capes or coats or feather boas.
  2. (uncountable) Terrain.
  3. Soil, earth.
  4. (countable) The bottom of a body of water.
  5. Basis, foundation, groundwork, legwork.
  6. (chiefly in the plural) Reason, (epistemic) justification, cause.
  7. Background, context, framework, surroundings.
  8. (historical) The area on which a battle is fought, particularly as referring to the area occupied by one side or the other. Often, according to the eventualities, “to give ground” or “to gain ground”.
  9. (figuratively, by extension) Advantage given or gained in any contest; e.g. in football, chess, debate or academic discourse.
  10. The plain surface upon which the figures of an artistic composition are set.
    crimson flowers on a white ground
  11. (sculpture) A flat surface upon which figures are raised in relief.
  12. (point lace) The net of small meshes upon which the embroidered pattern is applied.
    Brussels ground
  13. (etching) A gummy substance spread over the surface of a metal to be etched, to prevent the acid from eating except where an opening is made by the needle.
  14. (architecture, chiefly in the plural) One of the pieces of wood, flush with the plastering, to which mouldings etc. are attached.
    Grounds are usually put up first and the plastering floated flush with them.
  15. (countable) A soccer stadium.
  16. (electricity, Canada and US) An electrical conductor connected to the earth, or a large conductor whose electrical potential is taken as zero (such as a steel chassis).
  17. (countable, cricket) The area of grass on which a match is played (a cricket field); the entire arena in which it is played; the part of the field behind a batsman’s popping crease where he can not be run out (hence to make one’s ground).
  18. (music) A composition in which the bass, consisting of a few bars of independent notes, is continually repeated to a varying melody.
  19. (music) The tune on which descants are raised; the plain song.
    • 1592, William Shakespeare, The Life and Death of Richard III, act III, scene vii, in: The Works of Shakeſpear V (1726), page 149:
      Buck[ingham]   The Mayor is here at hand; pretend ſome fear, // Be not you ſpoke with, but by mighty ſuit; // And look you get a prayer-book in your hand, // And ſtand between two churchmen, good my lord, // For on that ground I’ll build a holy deſcant: // And be not eaſily won to our requeſts: // Play the maid’s part, ſtill anſwer nay, and take it.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Moore (Encyc.) to this entry?)
  20. The pit of a theatre.
    • 1614, Ben Jonson, Bartholomew Fair
      the understanding gentlemen o’ the ground here ask’d my judgment
Synonyms
  • (electricity) earth (British)
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
  • Pages starting with “ground”.
Translations
See also
  • floor
  • terra firma

Verb

ground (third-person singular simple present grounds, present participle grounding, simple past and past participle grounded)

  1. (US) To connect (an electrical conductor or device) to a ground.
    Synonym: earth
  2. (transitive) To punish, especially a child or teenager, by forcing them to stay at home and/or give up certain privileges.
    Synonym: gate
    If you don’t clean your room, I’ll have no choice but to ground you.
    Eric, you are grounded until further notice for lying to us about where you were last night!
    My kids are currently grounded from television.
  3. (transitive) To forbid (an aircraft or pilot) to fly.
    Because of the bad weather, all flights were grounded.
  4. To give a basic education in a particular subject; to instruct in elements or first principles.
    Jim was grounded in maths.
  5. (baseball) To hit a ground ball. Compare fly (verb(regular)) and line (verb).
  6. To place something on the ground.
  7. (intransitive) To run aground; to strike the bottom and remain fixed.
    The ship grounded on the bar.
  8. To found; to fix or set, as on a foundation, reason, or principle; to furnish a ground for; to fix firmly.
    • being rooted and grounded in love
    • So far from warranting any inference to the existence of a God, would, on the contrary, ground even an argument to his negation.
  9. (fine arts) To cover with a ground, as a copper plate for etching, or as paper or other materials with a uniform tint as a preparation for ornament.
  10. To improve or focus the mental or emotional state of.
    I ground myself with meditation.
Translations

Etymology 2

Inflected form of grind. See also milled.

Verb

ground

  1. simple past tense and past participle of grind

Adjective

ground (not comparable)

  1. Crushed, or reduced to small particles.
    Synonym: milled
  2. Processed by grinding.
    • 2018, H Glimpel, HJ Lauffer, A Bremstahler, Finishing Tool, In Particular End Milling Cutter, US Patent App. 15/764,739
      An advantage of such a finishing tool is that, after the machining, the workpiece has high surface quality. The surface which is produced appears finely ground to polished by means of this procedure.
Derived terms
  • ground beef
  • ground pepper
  • stoneground
Translations

Descendants

  • Tok Pisin: graun

References

  • ground at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • dog run

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • grund, grounde

Etymology

From Old English grund, from Proto-Germanic *grunduz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡruːnd/

Noun

ground

  1. ground
  2. Earth

Declension

Descendants

  • English: ground
    • Fiji Hindi: garaund
    • Maltese: grawnd
  • Scots: grund, groond, greund
  • Yola: greoune

References

  • “grǒund, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: lănd, IPA(key): /lænd/, [ɫeə̯nd]
  • Rhymes: -ænd

Etymology 1

From Middle English lond, land, from Old English land, lond (earth, land, soil, ground; defined piece of land, territory, realm, province, district; landed property; country (not town); ridge in a ploughed field), from Proto-West Germanic *land, from Proto-Germanic *landą (land), from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Cognate with Scots laund (land), West Frisian lân (land), Dutch land (land, country), German Land (land, country, state), Norwegian and Swedish land (land, country, shore, territory), Icelandic land (land). Non-Germanic cognates include Old Irish lann (heath), Welsh llan (enclosure), Breton lann (heath), Old Church Slavonic лѧдо (lędo), from Proto-Slavic *lęda (heath, wasteland) and Albanian lëndinë (heath, grassland).

Noun

land (countable and uncountable, plural lands)

  1. The part of Earth which is not covered by oceans or other bodies of water.
    Most insects live on land.
  2. Real estate or landed property; a partitioned and measurable area which is owned and on which buildings can be erected.
    There are 50 acres of land in this estate.
  3. A country or region.
    They come from a faraway land.
  4. A person’s country of origin and/or homeplace; homeland.
  5. The soil, in respect to its nature or quality for farming.
    wet land; good or bad land for growing potatoes
  6. (often in combination) realm, domain.
    I’m going to Disneyland.
    Maybe that’s how it works in TV-land, but not in the real world.
  7. (agriculture) The ground left unploughed between furrows; any of several portions into which a field is divided for ploughing.
  8. (Irish English, colloquial) A shock or fright.
    He got an awful land when the police arrived.
  9. (electronics) A conducting area on a board or chip which can be used for connecting wires.
  10. On a compact disc or similar recording medium, an area of the medium which does not have pits.
    • 1935, H. Courtney Bryson, The Gramophone Record (page 72)
      Now, assume that the recording is being done with 100 grooves per inch, and that the record groove is .006 inch wide. This means that the land on either side on any given groove in the absence of sound waves is .004 inch.
  11. (travel) The non-airline portion of an itinerary. Hotel, tours, cruises, etc.
    Our city offices sell a lot more land than our suburban offices.
  12. (obsolete) The ground or floor.
  13. (nautical) The lap of the strakes in a clinker-built boat; the lap of plates in an iron vessel; called also landing.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  14. In any surface prepared with indentations, perforations, or grooves, that part of the surface which is not so treated, such as the level part of a millstone between the furrows.
    1. (ballistics) The space between the rifling grooves in a gun.
  15. (Scotland, historical) A group of dwellings or tenements under one roof and having a common entry.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Verb

land (third-person singular simple present lands, present participle landing, simple past and past participle landed)

  1. (intransitive) To descend to a surface, especially from the air.
    The plane is about to land.
  2. (dated) To alight, to descend from a vehicle.
    • 1859, “Rules adopted by the Sixth Avenue Railway, N. Y.”, quoted in Alexander Easton, A Practical Treatise on Street or Horse-Power Railways, page 108:
      10. You will be civil and attentive to passengers, giving proper assistance to ladies and children getting in or out, and never start the car before passengers are fairly received or landed.
  3. (intransitive) To come into rest.
  4. (intransitive) To arrive on land, especially a shore or dock, from a body of water.
  5. (transitive) To bring to land.
    It can be tricky to land a helicopter.
    Use the net to land the fish.
  6. (transitive) To acquire; to secure.
  7. (transitive) To deliver. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  8. (intransitive) To go down well with an audience.
    Some of the comedian’s jokes failed to land.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old English hland.

Noun

land (uncountable)

  1. lant; urine

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch land, from Old Dutch lant, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lant/, [länt], [lant]

Noun

land (plural lande)

  1. country; nation

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lanˀ/, [lanˀ]
  • Rhymes: -and

Etymology 1

From Old Danish land, from Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, cognate with English land, German Land.

Noun

land n (singular definite landet, plural indefinite lande)

  1. country (a geographical area that is politically independent)
    Synonyms: stat, nation
  2. (uncountable, chiefly definite singular) country, countryside (rural areas outside the cities with agricultural production)
  3. land (part of Earth that is not covered in water)
  4. (as the last part of compounds) a large area or facility dedicated to a certain type of activity or merchandise
Usage notes

In compounds: land-, lande-, lands-.

Inflection
Derived terms

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

land

  1. imperative of lande

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑnt/
  • Hyphenation: land
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch lant, from Old Dutch lant, from Proto-West Germanic *land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Noun

land n (plural landen, diminutive landje n)

  1. land; country
  2. land (part of Earth not covered by water)
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: land
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: alanda, landi
  • Negerhollands: land, lant, lan
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: land, lantta
  • Sranan Tongo: lanti

Etymology 2

Verb

land

  1. first-person singular present indicative of landen
  2. imperative of landen

Elfdalian

Etymology

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Cognate with Swedish land.

Noun

land n

  1. country; nation

Declension


Faroese

Etymology 1

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Noun

land n (genitive singular lands, plural lond)

  1. land
  2. coast
  3. country, nation
  4. ground, soil
  5. the state
Declension
Related terms
  • landa

Etymology 2

From Old Norse hland, from Proto-Germanic *hlandą, from Proto-Indo-European *klān- (liquid, wet ground). Cognate with Lithuanian klanas (pool, puddle, slop).

Noun

land n (genitive singular lands, uncountable)

  1. (uncountable) urine
Declension

Gothic

Romanization

land

  1. Romanization of ????????????????

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lant/
  • Rhymes: -ant

Noun

land n (genitive singular lands, nominative plural lönd)

  1. (uncountable) land, earth, ground (part of the Earth not under water)
  2. (countable) country
  3. (uncountable) countryside, country
  4. (uncountable) land, as a mass noun, measurable in quantity
  5. (countable) tracts of land, an estate

Declension

Derived terms


Middle English

Noun

land

  1. Alternative form of lond

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑnː/
  • Rhymes: -ɑnː

Etymology 1

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Noun

land n (definite singular landet, indefinite plural land, definite plural landa or landene)

  1. country
  2. land
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Verb

land

  1. imperative of lande

References

  • “land” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑnː/, /lɑnd/ (example of pronunciation)

Etymology 1

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Akin to English land.

Noun

land n (definite singular landet, indefinite plural land, definite plural landa)

  1. country
    Noreg er eit land i nord.

    Norway is a country in the north.
  2. land
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse hland, from Proto-Germanic *hlandą.

Noun

land n (definite singular landet, indefinite plural land, definite plural landa)

  1. urine from livestock

References

  • “land” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą.

Noun

land n (genitive lanz, plural land)

  1. land
    • 1241, Codex Holmiensis, prologue.
      Mæth logh skal land byggæs.

      With law shall land be built.

Declension

Descendants

  • Danish: land

Old English

Alternative forms

  • lond, lænd

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Cognate with Old Saxon land, Old Frisian land, lond, Old Dutch lant (Dutch land), Old High German lant (German Land), Old Norse land (Swedish land), Gothic ???????????????? (land). The Proto-Indo-European root is also the source of Proto-Celtic *landā (Welsh llan (enclosure), Breton lann (heath)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑnd/

Noun

land n

  1. land (dry portion of the Earth’s surface)
  2. a country
  3. region within a country: district, province
  4. the country, countryside
  5. owned or tilled land, an estate

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

  • belandian (to bereave of land, dispossess)
  • belendan (to bereave of land, dispossess)
  • ġelandian (to land, to become land)
  • ġelendan (to near, land, or come into lands as wealth)
  • lendan (to come to land)

Descendants

  • Middle English: lond
    • English: land
    • Scots: laund, land
    • Yola: lhoan, lone

References

  • Joseph Bosworth and T. Northcote Toller (1898), “land”, in An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Old Irish

Noun

land ?

  1. Alternative spelling of lann

Mutation


Old Norse

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath). Cognate with Old Saxon land, Old Frisian land, lond, Old English land, lond, Old Dutch lant, Old High German lant, Gothic ???????????????? (land).

Noun

land n (genitive lands, plural lǫnd)

  1. land

Declension

Descendants

  • Icelandic: land
  • Faroese: land
  • Norn: land
  • Norwegian: land
  • Old Swedish: land
    • Elfdalian: land
    • Swedish: land
  • Old Danish: land
    • Danish: land
  • Scanian: lann
  • Gutnish: land, lande, landi

References

  • land inGeir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *land.

Cognate with Old English land, lond, Old Frisian land, lond, Dutch land, Old High German lant (German Land), Old Norse land (Swedish land), Gothic ???????????????? (land). The Proto-Indo-European root is also the source of Proto-Celtic *landā (Welsh llan (enclosure), Breton lann (heath)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑnd/

Noun

land n

  1. land

Declension


Descendants

  • Middle Low German: lant
    • Dutch Low Saxon: laand
    • German Low German: Land
      • Plautdietsch: Launt

Old Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą.

Noun

land n

  1. land

Declension

Descendants

  • Elfdalian: land
  • Swedish: land

Polish

Etymology

From German Land, from Middle High German lant, from Old High German lant, from Proto-West Germanic *land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lant/

Noun

land m inan

  1. Land (federal state in Austria and Germany)
  2. (Poznań) countryside (rural area)
    Synonyms: prowincja, wieś

Declension

Further reading

  • land in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • land in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology

From German Land

Noun

land n (plural landuri)

  1. land (German and Austrian province)

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

From German Land.

Noun

land m (plural lands)

  1. one of the federal states of Germany

Further reading

  • “land” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish land, from Old Norse land, from Proto-Germanic *landą, from Proto-Indo-European *lendʰ- (land, heath).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /land/, [l̪an̪ːd̪], (colloquial) /lan/
  • Rhymes: -and

Noun

land n

  1. a land, a country, a nation, a state
  2. (uncountable) land, ground, earth, territory; as opposed to sea or air
  3. (uncountable) land, countryside, earth, ground suitable for farming; as opposed to towns and cities
  4. a garden plot, short for trädgårdsland; small piece of ground for growing vegetables, flowers, etc.

Declension

Synonyms

  • (country): nation
  • (neither sea nor air): backe, landbacke, mark
  • (ground suitable for farming): mark (owned land in general, for farming or not)

Derived terms

References

  • land in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

Zealandic

Etymology

From Middle Dutch lant

Noun

land n (plural [please provide])

  1. land

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial