ground vs strand what difference

what is difference between ground and strand

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ɡɹaʊnd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnd

Etymology 1

From Middle English grounde, from Old English grund, from Proto-Germanic *grunduz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰr̥mtu-. Cognate with West Frisian grûn, Dutch grond and German Grund. Non-Germanic cognates include Albanian grundë (brittle earth).

Alternative forms

  • GND (contraction used in electronics)

Noun

ground (countable and uncountable, plural grounds)

  1. The surface of the Earth, as opposed to the sky or water or underground.
    • Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. [] Frills, ruffles, flounces, lace, complicated seams and gores: not only did they sweep the ground and have to be held up in one hand elegantly as you walked along, but they had little capes or coats or feather boas.
  2. (uncountable) Terrain.
  3. Soil, earth.
  4. (countable) The bottom of a body of water.
  5. Basis, foundation, groundwork, legwork.
  6. (chiefly in the plural) Reason, (epistemic) justification, cause.
  7. Background, context, framework, surroundings.
  8. (historical) The area on which a battle is fought, particularly as referring to the area occupied by one side or the other. Often, according to the eventualities, “to give ground” or “to gain ground”.
  9. (figuratively, by extension) Advantage given or gained in any contest; e.g. in football, chess, debate or academic discourse.
  10. The plain surface upon which the figures of an artistic composition are set.
    crimson flowers on a white ground
  11. (sculpture) A flat surface upon which figures are raised in relief.
  12. (point lace) The net of small meshes upon which the embroidered pattern is applied.
    Brussels ground
  13. (etching) A gummy substance spread over the surface of a metal to be etched, to prevent the acid from eating except where an opening is made by the needle.
  14. (architecture, chiefly in the plural) One of the pieces of wood, flush with the plastering, to which mouldings etc. are attached.
    Grounds are usually put up first and the plastering floated flush with them.
  15. (countable) A soccer stadium.
  16. (electricity, Canada and US) An electrical conductor connected to the earth, or a large conductor whose electrical potential is taken as zero (such as a steel chassis).
  17. (countable, cricket) The area of grass on which a match is played (a cricket field); the entire arena in which it is played; the part of the field behind a batsman’s popping crease where he can not be run out (hence to make one’s ground).
  18. (music) A composition in which the bass, consisting of a few bars of independent notes, is continually repeated to a varying melody.
  19. (music) The tune on which descants are raised; the plain song.
    • 1592, William Shakespeare, The Life and Death of Richard III, act III, scene vii, in: The Works of Shakeſpear V (1726), page 149:
      Buck[ingham]   The Mayor is here at hand; pretend ſome fear, // Be not you ſpoke with, but by mighty ſuit; // And look you get a prayer-book in your hand, // And ſtand between two churchmen, good my lord, // For on that ground I’ll build a holy deſcant: // And be not eaſily won to our requeſts: // Play the maid’s part, ſtill anſwer nay, and take it.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Moore (Encyc.) to this entry?)
  20. The pit of a theatre.
    • 1614, Ben Jonson, Bartholomew Fair
      the understanding gentlemen o’ the ground here ask’d my judgment
Synonyms
  • (electricity) earth (British)
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
  • Pages starting with “ground”.
Translations
See also
  • floor
  • terra firma

Verb

ground (third-person singular simple present grounds, present participle grounding, simple past and past participle grounded)

  1. (US) To connect (an electrical conductor or device) to a ground.
    Synonym: earth
  2. (transitive) To punish, especially a child or teenager, by forcing them to stay at home and/or give up certain privileges.
    Synonym: gate
    If you don’t clean your room, I’ll have no choice but to ground you.
    Eric, you are grounded until further notice for lying to us about where you were last night!
    My kids are currently grounded from television.
  3. (transitive) To forbid (an aircraft or pilot) to fly.
    Because of the bad weather, all flights were grounded.
  4. To give a basic education in a particular subject; to instruct in elements or first principles.
    Jim was grounded in maths.
  5. (baseball) To hit a ground ball. Compare fly (verb(regular)) and line (verb).
  6. To place something on the ground.
  7. (intransitive) To run aground; to strike the bottom and remain fixed.
    The ship grounded on the bar.
  8. To found; to fix or set, as on a foundation, reason, or principle; to furnish a ground for; to fix firmly.
    • being rooted and grounded in love
    • So far from warranting any inference to the existence of a God, would, on the contrary, ground even an argument to his negation.
  9. (fine arts) To cover with a ground, as a copper plate for etching, or as paper or other materials with a uniform tint as a preparation for ornament.
  10. To improve or focus the mental or emotional state of.
    I ground myself with meditation.
Translations

Etymology 2

Inflected form of grind. See also milled.

Verb

ground

  1. simple past tense and past participle of grind

Adjective

ground (not comparable)

  1. Crushed, or reduced to small particles.
    Synonym: milled
  2. Processed by grinding.
    • 2018, H Glimpel, HJ Lauffer, A Bremstahler, Finishing Tool, In Particular End Milling Cutter, US Patent App. 15/764,739
      An advantage of such a finishing tool is that, after the machining, the workpiece has high surface quality. The surface which is produced appears finely ground to polished by means of this procedure.
Derived terms
  • ground beef
  • ground pepper
  • stoneground
Translations

Descendants

  • Tok Pisin: graun

References

  • ground at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • dog run

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • grund, grounde

Etymology

From Old English grund, from Proto-Germanic *grunduz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡruːnd/

Noun

ground

  1. ground
  2. Earth

Declension

Descendants

  • English: ground
    • Fiji Hindi: garaund
    • Maltese: grawnd
  • Scots: grund, groond, greund
  • Yola: greoune

References

  • “grǒund, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /stɹænd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /stɹænd/, [stɹɛənd]
  • Rhymes: -ænd

Etymology 1

From Middle English strand, strond, from Old English strand (strand, sea-shore, shore), from Proto-Germanic *strandō (edge, rim, shore), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)trAnt- (strand, border, field), from Proto-Indo-European *ster- (to broaden, spread out). Cognate with West Frisian strân, Dutch strand, German Strand, Danish strand, Swedish strand, Norwegian Bokmål strand.

Noun

strand (plural strands)

  1. The shore or beach of the sea or ocean; shore; beach.
  2. (poetic, archaic or regional) The shore or beach of a lake or river.
  3. A small brook or rivulet.
  4. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) A passage for water; gutter.
  5. A street (perhaps from the similarity of shape).
Alternative forms
  • strond (obsolete)
Translations

Verb

strand (third-person singular simple present strands, present participle stranding, simple past and past participle stranded)

  1. (transitive, nautical) To run aground; to beach.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To leave (someone) in a difficult situation; to abandon or desert.
  3. (transitive, baseball) To cause the third out of an inning to be made, leaving a runner on base.
    Jones pops up; that’s going to strand a pair.
Synonyms
  • (run aground): beach
  • (leave someone in a difficult situation): abandon, desert
Translations

Etymology 2

Origin uncertain. Cognate with Scots stran, strawn, strand (strand). Perhaps the same as strand (“rivulet, stream, gutter”; see Etymology 1 above); or from Middle English *stran, from Old French estran (a rope, cord), from Middle High German stren, strene (skein, strand), from Old High German streno, from Proto-West Germanic *strenō, from Proto-Germanic *strinô (strip, strand), from Proto-Indo-European *strēy-, *ster- (strip, line, streak, ray, stripe, row); related to Dutch streen (skein, hank of thread, strand, string), German Strähne (skein, hank of thread, strand of hair).

Noun

strand (plural strands)

  1. Each of the strings which, twisted together, make up a yarn, rope or cord.
  2. A string.
  3. An individual length of any fine, string-like substance.
    strand of spaghetti
    strand of hair.
  4. (electronics) A group of wires, usually twisted or braided.
  5. (broadcasting) A series of programmes on a particular theme or linked subject.
  6. (figuratively) An element in a composite whole; a sequence of linked events or facts; a logical thread.
    strand of truth
    • 2004, David Wray, Literacy: Major Themes in Education, Taylor & Francis →ISBN, page 78
      She responds to both questions in writing and checks her answer on the fact question. Her suspicions confirmed about the importance of the two names, Miranda vows to pay close attention to this strand of the story as she continues to read.
  7. (genetics) A nucleotide chain.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:string
Derived terms
  • do the strand
Translations

Note: many languages have particular words for “a strand of <substance>” that are different for each substance. The translations below refer to strands in general. You might find a more appropriate translation under the word for the substance itself.

Verb

strand (third-person singular simple present strands, present participle stranding, simple past and past participle stranded)

  1. (transitive) To break a strand of (a rope).
  2. (transitive) To form by uniting strands.
Translations

Anagrams

  • Arndts, drants

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch strand, from Middle Dutch strant.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /strant/

Noun

strand (plural strande, diminutive strandjie)

  1. beach

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse strǫnd.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stran/, [sd̥ʁɑnˀ]

Noun

strand c (singular definite stranden, plural indefinite strande)

  1. beach
  2. shore, seashore
  3. seaside

Inflection

Derived terms

Verb

strand

  1. imperative of strande

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /strɑnt/
  • Hyphenation: strand
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch strant. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

strand n (plural stranden, diminutive strandje n)

  1. beach, strand
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: strand

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

strand

  1. first-person singular present indicative of stranden
  2. imperative of stranden

Hungarian

Etymology

From German Strand.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈʃtrɒnd]
  • Rhymes: -ɒnd

Noun

strand (plural strandok)

  1. beach (a sandy shore of a body of water used for summertime leisure, swimming, suntanning)
  2. pool, swimming pool (an urban open-air facility with lawns, trees and several artificially constructed pools, used for summertime leisure)

Declension

Derived terms

  • strandol
  • strandos

(Compound words):

  • strandcipő
  • strandpapucs
  • strandtáska

References

Further reading

  • strand in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Icelandic

Etymology

From stranda (to run aground).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /strant/
  • Rhymes: -ant

Noun

strand n (genitive singular strands, nominative plural strönd)

  1. running aground, stranding

Declension


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • strande
  • stround, stronde, strond

Etymology

From Old English strand.

Noun

strand (plural strandes)

  1. (chiefly Northern) beach, shoreline

Descendants

  • English: strand
  • Scots: strand
  • Yola: sthroane

References

  • “strō̆nd(e, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse strǫnd

Noun

strand f or m (definite singular stranda or stranden, indefinite plural strender, definite plural strendene)

  1. a beach or shore
Derived terms
  • nakenstrand
  • sandstrand
  • strande
  • strandlinje

Etymology 2

Verb

strand

  1. imperative of strande

References

  • “strand” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse strǫnd. Akin to English strand.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /strɑnd/, /strɑnː/

Noun

strand f (definite singular stranda, indefinite plural strender, definite plural strendene)

  1. a beach or shore

Derived terms

  • nakenstrand
  • sandstrand
  • strande
  • strandlinje

References

  • “strand” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *strandō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /strɑnd/

Noun

strand n

  1. beach
  2. shore

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: strand, strande
    • English: strand
    • Scots: strand
    • Yola: sthroane
  • Old French: estrande, estran

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *strandō (edge; shore).

Noun

strand n

  1. beach

Descendants

  • Middle Low German: strand, strant m
    • Plautdietsch: Straunt

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish strand, from Old Norse strǫnd, from Proto-Germanic *strandō, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)trAnt-.

Pronunciation

Noun

strand c

  1. beach (not necessarily sandy)
  2. shore

Declension

Related terms

References

  • strand in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

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