growl vs rumble what difference

what is difference between growl and rumble

English

Etymology

From Middle English groulen, grollen, gurlen (of the bowels: to growl, rumble), either possibly from Old French groler (variant of croler (to be agitated, shake)), grouler, grouller (to growl, grumble), from Frankish *grullen, *gruljan or from Old English gryllan, both from Proto-Germanic *gruljaną (to make a sound; to growl, grumble, rumble), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰer- (to make a noise; to mumble, murmur; to rattle; to grind; to rub, stroke), probably ultimately imitative. The word is cognate with Middle Dutch grollen (to make a noise; to croak, grumble, murmur; to be angry) (modern Dutch grollen (to grumble)), German grollen (to rumble; to be angry, bear ill will), Old English grillan, griellan (to provoke, offend; to gnash the teeth). Compare grill.

The noun is derived from the verb.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: gräŭl, IPA(key): /ɡɹaʊl/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɡɹaʊl/
  • Rhymes: -aʊl

Noun

growl (plural growls)

  1. A deep, rumbling, threatening sound made in the throat by an animal.
  2. (by extension) The rumbling sound made by a person’s stomach when hungry.
  3. (by extension) An aggressive grumbling.
  4. (jazz, by extension) A low-pitched rumbling sound produced with a wind instrument.

Derived terms

  • death growl
  • growlf
  • undergrowl

Translations

See also

  • grr

Verb

growl (third-person singular simple present growls, present participle growling, simple past and past participle growled)

  1. (intransitive) To utter a deep guttural sound, as an angry animal; to give forth an angry, grumbling sound.
    Synonyms: gnar, gnarl, gurl, snarl
  2. (intransitive, jazz) Of a wind instrument: to produce a low-pitched rumbling sound.
  3. (intransitive, software) To send a user a message via the Growl software library.
  4. (transitive) To express (something) by growling.
  5. (transitive, jazz) To play a wind instrument in a way that produces a low-pitched rumbling sound.

Derived terms

Translations

Alternative forms

  • groil (dialectal)
  • groul (obsolete)

References

Further reading

  • growling (wind instruments) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • growling (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • glowr


English

Alternative forms

  • rummle, rommle (dialectal)

Etymology

From Middle English rumblen, romblen, rummelyn, frequentative form of romen (to roar), equivalent to rome +‎ -le. Cognate with Dutch rommelen (to rumble), Low German rummeln (to rumble), German rumpeln (to be noisy), Danish rumle (to rumble), all of imitative origin.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈɹʌmb(ə)l/
  • Rhymes: -ʌmbəl

Noun

rumble (plural rumbles)

  1. A low, heavy, continuous sound, such as that of thunder or a hungry stomach.
  2. (slang) A street fight or brawl.
  3. A rotating cask or box in which small articles are smoothed or polished by friction against each other.
  4. (dated) A seat for servants, behind the body of a carriage.
    • Kit, well wrapped, [] was in the rumble behind.

Translations

Verb

rumble (third-person singular simple present rumbles, present participle rumbling, simple past and past participle rumbled)

  1. (intransitive) To make a low, heavy, continuous sound.
  2. (transitive) To discover deceitful or underhanded behaviour.
  3. (intransitive) To move while making a rumbling noise.
  4. (slang, intransitive) To fight; to brawl.
  5. (video games, intransitive, of a game controller) to provide haptic feedback by vibrating.
  6. (transitive) To cause to pass through a rumble, or polishing machine.
  7. (obsolete) To murmur; to ripple.

Translations

Interjection

rumble

  1. An onomatopoeia describing a rumbling noise

Anagrams

  • Blumer, Bulmer, lumber, umbrel

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