grub vs sponge what difference

what is difference between grub and sponge

English

Etymology

From hypothetical Old English *grubbian, from Proto-Germanic *grubb- (compare Old High German grubilōn (to dig, search), German grübeln (to meditate, ponder)), from Proto-Germanic *grub- (to dig). The noun sense of “larva” (c. 1400) may derive from the notion of “digging insect” or from the possibly unrelated Middle English grub (dwarfish fellow). The slang sense of “food” is first recorded 1659, and has been linked with birds eating grubs or with bub (drink).”

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹʌb/
  • Rhymes: -ʌb

Noun

grub (countable and uncountable, plural grubs)

  1. (countable) An immature stage in the life cycle of an insect; a larva.
    Synonym: larva
  2. (uncountable, slang) Food.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:food
  3. (Australia, slang) A dirty person.
  4. (Australia, slang) A despicable person; a lowlife.
  5. (obsolete) A short, thick man; a dwarf.
    • 1602, Richard Carew, Survey of Cornwall
      John Romane, a short clownish grub, would bear the whole carcase of an ox, yet never tugged with him.

Derived terms

  • grubby
  • grublike
  • witchety grub

Translations

See also

  • caterpillar
  • maggot
  • worm

Verb

grub (third-person singular simple present grubs, present participle grubbing, simple past and past participle grubbed)

  1. To scavenge or in some way scrounge, typically for food.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To dig; to dig up by the roots; to root out by digging; often followed by up.
    to grub up trees, rushes, or sedge
    • 1846, Julius Hare, The Mission of the Comforter
      They do not attempt to grub up the root of sin.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      Yet there was no time to be lost if I was ever to get out alive, and so I groped with my hands against the side of the grave until I made out the bottom edge of the slab, and then fell to grubbing beneath it with my fingers.
  3. (slang, dated, transitive) To supply with food.
  4. (slang, dated) To eat.
    • “John dear , we must give this little fellow his supper , you know .”
      “ Of course we must , my darling . ”
      “ He has been grubbing and grubbing at school, ” said Bella

Translations

Anagrams

  • -burg, Burg, burg

German

Pronunciation

Verb

grub

  1. singular past imperfect of graben

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *grǫbъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡrûːb/

Adjective

grȗb (definite grȗbī, comparative grȕbljī, Cyrillic spelling гру̑б)

  1. rough, coarse
  2. rude

Declension



English

Etymology

From Old English spunge, taken from Latin spongia, from Ancient Greek σπογγιά (spongiá), related to σπόγγος (spóngos).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: spŭnj, IPA(key): /spʌnd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌndʒ

Noun

sponge (countable and uncountable, plural sponges)

  1. (countable) Any of various marine invertebrates, mostly of the phylum Porifera, that have a porous skeleton often of silica.
    Synonyms: sea sponge, bath sponge, poriferan, porifer
  2. (countable) A piece of porous material used for washing (originally made from the invertebrates, now often made of plastic).
    Synonym: bath sponge
  3. (uncountable) A porous material such as sponges consist of.
  4. (informal) A heavy drinker.
    Synonyms: souse, swill-pot; see also Thesaurus:drunkard
  5. (countable, uncountable) A type of light cake.
    Synonym: sponge cake
  6. (countable, uncountable, Britain) A type of steamed pudding.
    Synonym: sponge pudding
  7. (slang) A person who takes advantage of the generosity of others (abstractly imagined to absorb or soak up the money or efforts of others like a sponge).
    Synonyms: freeloader, sponger; see also Thesaurus:scrounger
  8. A person who readily absorbs ideas.
    • 2014, Phoeve Hutchison, Are You Listening? Life Is Talking to You! (page 145)
      For this reason, we need to think of our children as sponges of information and watch their sources carefully. We also need to always model appropriate behaviour, as we are a constant source of new information.
  9. (countable) A form of contraception that is inserted vaginally; a contraceptive sponge.
  10. Any sponge-like substance.
    1. (baking) Dough before it is kneaded and formed into loaves, and after it is converted into a light, spongy mass by the agency of the yeast or leaven.
    2. Iron from the puddling furnace, in a pasty condition.
    3. Iron ore, in masses, reduced but not melted or worked.
  11. A mop for cleaning the bore of a cannon after a discharge. It consists of a cylinder of wood, covered with sheepskin with the wool on, or cloth with a heavy looped nap, and having a handle, or staff.
  12. The extremity, or point, of a horseshoe, corresponding to the heel.
  13. (slang) A nuclear power plant worker routinely exposed to radiation.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Hindi: स्पंज (spañj)
  • Japanese: スポンジ (suponji)
  • Korean: 스펀지 (seupeonji)
  • Pashto: سپنج(spanj)
  • Welsh: spynj

Translations

See also

  • foam

Verb

sponge (third-person singular simple present sponges, present participle sponging, simple past and past participle sponged)

  1. (intransitive, slang) To take advantage of the kindness of others.
  2. (transitive, intransitive with on or upon) To get by imposition; to scrounge.
    Synonym: blag
    • July 17 1735, Jonathan Swift, letter to Lord Ornery
      I am an utter stranger to the persons and places, except when half a score come to sponge on me every Sunday evening
  3. (transitive) To deprive (somebody) of something by imposition.
    • How came such multitudes of our nation [] to be sponged of their plate and their money?
  4. To clean, soak up, or dab with a sponge.
  5. To suck in, or imbibe, like a sponge.
  6. To wipe out with a sponge, as letters or writing; to efface; to destroy all trace of.
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      Lett the eyes which have looked on Idols, sponge out their unlawfull acts
  7. (intransitive, baking) To be converted, as dough, into a light, spongy mass by the agency of yeast or leaven.
  8. (marine biology, of dolphins) To use a piece of wild sponge as a tool when foraging for food.

Translations

Further reading

  • sponge on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • pengos, pengős

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