grudge vs score what difference

what is difference between grudge and score

English

Etymology

A variant of grutch (mid 15th-century, younger than begrudge), from Middle English grucchen (to murmur, complain, feel envy, begrudge), from Old French grouchier, groucier (to murmur, grumble), of Germanic origin, akin to Middle High German grogezen (to howl, wail), German grocken (to croak). Compare also Old Norse krytja (to murmur), Old High German grunzen (to grunt).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹʌdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌdʒ

Noun

grudge (plural grudges)

  1. (countable) Deep-seated and/or long-term animosity or ill will about something or someone, especially due to a past misdeed or mistreatment.
    • 1607, Barnabe Barnes, THE DIVILS CHARTER: A TRAGÆDIE Conteining the Life and Death of Pope Alexander the ſixt, ACTVS. 5, SCÆ. 1:
      Bag. And if I do not my good Lord damme me for it
      I haue an old grudge at him cole black curre,
      He ſhall haue two ſteele bullets ſtrongly charg’d
    • 2001, H. Rider Haggard, All Adventure: Child of Storm/a Tale of Three Lions, Essential Library (xLibris), page 274:
      It is towards Saduko that he bears a grudge, for you know, my father, one should never pull a drowning man out of the stream — which is what Saduko did, for had it not been for his treachery, Cetewayo would have sunk beneath the water of Death — especially if it is only to spite a woman who hates him.

Derived terms

  • grudging
  • grudgy
  • hold a grudge
  • have a grudge
  • bear a grudge

Related terms

  • rancor
  • spite
  • grudge fuck
  • grudge match
  • resentment

Translations

Verb

grudge (third-person singular simple present grudges, present participle grudging, simple past and past participle grudged)

  1. To be unwilling to give or allow (someone something). [from 16th c.]
    • 1608, Henrie Gosson, The Woefull and Lamentable wast and spoile done by a suddaine Fire in S. Edmonds-bury in Suffolke, on Munday the tenth of Aprill. 1608., reprinted by F. Pawsey, Old Butter Market, Ipswich, 1845, page 6:
      Wee shall finde our whole life so necessarily ioyned with sorrow, that we ought rather delight (and take pleasure) in Gods louing chastisements, and admonitions, then any way murmure and grudge at our crosses, or tribulations :
    • 1841, Edmund Burke, The Annual Register, Rivingtons, page 430:
      If we of the central land were to grudge you what is beneficial, and not to compassionate your wants, then wherewithal could you foreigners manage to exist?
    • 1869, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Fields, Osgood, & Co., p. 62 [1]:
      Of course, his interest in the war and in the regiment was unbounded; he did not take to drill with especial readiness, but he was insatiable of it, and grudged every moment of relaxation.
    • 1953, Saul Bellow, The Adventures of Augie March, Viking Press, 1953, chapter 3:
      I’ve never seen such people for borrowing and lending; there was dough changing hands in all directions, and nobody grudged anyone.
  2. (obsolete) To grumble, complain; to be dissatisfied. [15th-18th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Luke XV:
      And the pharises, and scribes grudged sainge: He receaveth to his company synners […].
  3. (obsolete) To hold or harbour with malicious disposition or purpose; to cherish enviously.
  4. (obsolete) To feel compunction or grief.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Fisher to this entry?)

Derived terms

  • begrudge
  • grudgement
  • grudgery
  • grudgingly
  • misgrudge

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Dugger, Gudger, gurged, rugged


English

Etymology

From Middle English score, skore, schore, from Old English scoru (notch; tally; score), from Old Norse skor, from Proto-Germanic *skurō (incision; tear; rift), which is related to *skeraną (to cut).

Cognate with Icelandic skora, Swedish skåra, Danish skår. Related to shear.
(For twenty: The mark on a tally made by drovers for every twenty beasts passing through a tollgate.)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: skôr, IPA(key): /skɔː/
  • (General American) enPR: skôrʹ, IPA(key): /skɔɹ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: skōrʹ, IPA(key): /sko(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /skoə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)

Noun

score (plural scores)

  1. The total number of goals, points, runs, etc. earned by a participant in a game.
  2. The number of points accrued by each of the participants in a game, expressed as a ratio or a series of numbers.
  3. The performance of an individual or group on an examination or test, expressed by a number, letter, or other symbol; a grade.
  4. Twenty, 20.
  5. (gambling) An amount of money won in gambling; winnings.
    • 2013, Arnold Snyder, Big Book of Blackjack
      Use a few “introductory plays” to become known to a casino before you go for a big score.
  6. A distance of twenty yards, in ancient archery and gunnery.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  7. A weight of twenty pounds.
  8. (music) The written form of a musical composition showing all instrumental and vocal parts below each other.
  9. (music) The music of a movie or play.
  10. Subject.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 245e.
      Well, although we haven’t discussed the views of all those who make precise reckonings of being and not [being], we’ve done enough on that score.
  11. Account; reason; motive; sake; behalf.
    • But left the trade, as many more / Have lately done on the same score.
    • 1665, John Dryden, The Indian Emperour
      You act your kindness on Cydria’s score.
  12. A notch or incision; especially, one that is made as a tally mark; hence, a mark, or line, made for the purpose of account.
  13. An account or reckoning; account of dues; bill; debt.
  14. (US, crime, slang) a criminal act, especially:
    1. A robbery.
    2. A bribe paid to a police officer.
    3. An illegal sale, especially of drugs.
    4. A prostitute’s client.
  15. (US, vulgar, slang) A sexual conquest.

Usage notes

As a quantity, a score is counted as any other unit: ten score, twelve score, fourteen score, etc. (or tenscore, twelvescore). There is no word for 202; rather, twenty score is used, and twice that forty score.

Synonyms

  • (prostitute’s client): see Thesaurus:prostitute’s client

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

score (third-person singular simple present scores, present participle scoring, simple past and past participle scored)

  1. (transitive) To cut a notch or a groove in a surface.
  2. (intransitive) To record the tally of points for a game, a match, or an examination.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To obtain something desired.
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 50
      “Of course it would be hypocritical for me to pretend that I regret what Abraham did. After all, I’ve scored by it.”
    1. To earn points in a game.
    2. To achieve (a score) in e.g. a test.
      • 2004, Diane McGuinness, Early reading instruction: what science really tells us about how to teach reading
        At the end of first grade, the children scored 80 percent correct on this test, a value that remained unchanged through third grade.
    3. (gambling) To win money by gambling.
      • 2005, Shannon Nash, For the Love of Money (page 215)
        [] he scored big by hitting the jack pot at the Bellagio (he won $7,000). The next day, he won $15,000 on the nickel machines at the Palm Casino!
    4. (slang) To acquire or gain.
    5. (US, crime, slang, of a police officer) To extract a bribe.
    6. (vulgar, slang) To obtain a sexual favor.
  4. (transitive) To provide (a film, etc.) with a musical score.
    • 1974, New York Magazine (volume 7, number 45, page 98)
      Godfather II is nothing like ready. It is not yet scored, and thus not mixed. There remain additional shooting, looping, editing.

Synonyms

  • (to cut a groove in a surface): groove, notch
  • (to record the score): keep, score, tally
  • (to earn points in a game):
  • (to achieve a score in a test):
  • (to acquire or gain): come by, earn, obtain; see also Thesaurus:receive
  • (to extract a bribe): shake down
  • (to obtain a sexual favor): pull
  • (to provide with a musical score): soundtrack

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Irish: scóráil

Translations

Interjection

score!

  1. (US, slang) Acknowledgement of success

See also

  • grade

References

  • Tom Dalzell, The Routledge Dictionary of Modern American Slang and Unconventional English, 2008, page 846

Anagrams

  • Corse, Crose, ROCEs, Secor, Sorce, ceros, cores, corse, creos, ocres

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English score.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skoːrə/, [ˈsɡ̊oːɐ]

Noun

score c (singular definite scoren, plural indefinite scorer)

  1. A score, a number of points earned.

Declension

Verb

score

  1. score a goal/point
  2. land (to acquire; to secure)
  3. (slang) steal
  4. persuade (someone) to have sex with oneself [from 1959]

Conjugation

Derived terms


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English score.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈskoː.rə/
  • Hyphenation: sco‧re

Noun

score m (plural scores, diminutive scoretje n)

  1. score (number of points earned)

Derived terms

  • scorebord

Related terms

  • scoren

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English score.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skɔʁ/

Noun

score m (plural scores)

  1. score (in a sport, game)

Derived terms

  • scorer

Further reading

  • “score” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • corse, Corse
  • ocres

Norwegian Bokmål

Alternative forms

  • (of noun) skår
  • (of verb) skåre

Etymology

Via English score, from Old Norse skor. Related to Old Norse skera (modern Norwegian Bokmål skjære).

Noun

score m (definite singular scoren, indefinite plural scorer, definite plural scorene)

  1. a score

Verb

score (imperative scor, present tense scorer, passive scores, simple past and past participle scora or scoret, present participle scorende)

  1. to score (earn points in a game)

Derived terms

  • scorer
  • scoring
  • scoringsposisjon
  • scoringssjanse

References

  • “score” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “score” in The Ordnett Dictionary

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • (of noun) skår
  • (of verb) skåre, skåra
  • (of verb) scora

Etymology

Borrowed from English score. Doublet of skòr.

Noun

score m (definite singular scoren, indefinite plural scorar, definite plural scorane)

  1. a score

Verb

score (present tense scorar, past tense scora, past participle scora, passive infinitive scorast, present participle scorande, imperative scor)

  1. to score (earn points in a game)

References

  • “score” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Spanish

Etymology

From English score.

Noun

score m (plural scores)

  1. (sports) score

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