grudge vs stew what difference

what is difference between grudge and stew

English

Etymology

A variant of grutch (mid 15th-century, younger than begrudge), from Middle English grucchen (to murmur, complain, feel envy, begrudge), from Old French grouchier, groucier (to murmur, grumble), of Germanic origin, akin to Middle High German grogezen (to howl, wail), German grocken (to croak). Compare also Old Norse krytja (to murmur), Old High German grunzen (to grunt).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹʌdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌdʒ

Noun

grudge (plural grudges)

  1. (countable) Deep-seated and/or long-term animosity or ill will about something or someone, especially due to a past misdeed or mistreatment.
    • 1607, Barnabe Barnes, THE DIVILS CHARTER: A TRAGÆDIE Conteining the Life and Death of Pope Alexander the ſixt, ACTVS. 5, SCÆ. 1:
      Bag. And if I do not my good Lord damme me for it
      I haue an old grudge at him cole black curre,
      He ſhall haue two ſteele bullets ſtrongly charg’d
    • 2001, H. Rider Haggard, All Adventure: Child of Storm/a Tale of Three Lions, Essential Library (xLibris), page 274:
      It is towards Saduko that he bears a grudge, for you know, my father, one should never pull a drowning man out of the stream — which is what Saduko did, for had it not been for his treachery, Cetewayo would have sunk beneath the water of Death — especially if it is only to spite a woman who hates him.

Derived terms

  • grudging
  • grudgy
  • hold a grudge
  • have a grudge
  • bear a grudge

Related terms

  • rancor
  • spite
  • grudge fuck
  • grudge match
  • resentment

Translations

Verb

grudge (third-person singular simple present grudges, present participle grudging, simple past and past participle grudged)

  1. To be unwilling to give or allow (someone something). [from 16th c.]
    • 1608, Henrie Gosson, The Woefull and Lamentable wast and spoile done by a suddaine Fire in S. Edmonds-bury in Suffolke, on Munday the tenth of Aprill. 1608., reprinted by F. Pawsey, Old Butter Market, Ipswich, 1845, page 6:
      Wee shall finde our whole life so necessarily ioyned with sorrow, that we ought rather delight (and take pleasure) in Gods louing chastisements, and admonitions, then any way murmure and grudge at our crosses, or tribulations :
    • 1841, Edmund Burke, The Annual Register, Rivingtons, page 430:
      If we of the central land were to grudge you what is beneficial, and not to compassionate your wants, then wherewithal could you foreigners manage to exist?
    • 1869, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Fields, Osgood, & Co., p. 62 [1]:
      Of course, his interest in the war and in the regiment was unbounded; he did not take to drill with especial readiness, but he was insatiable of it, and grudged every moment of relaxation.
    • 1953, Saul Bellow, The Adventures of Augie March, Viking Press, 1953, chapter 3:
      I’ve never seen such people for borrowing and lending; there was dough changing hands in all directions, and nobody grudged anyone.
  2. (obsolete) To grumble, complain; to be dissatisfied. [15th-18th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Luke XV:
      And the pharises, and scribes grudged sainge: He receaveth to his company synners […].
  3. (obsolete) To hold or harbour with malicious disposition or purpose; to cherish enviously.
  4. (obsolete) To feel compunction or grief.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Fisher to this entry?)

Derived terms

  • begrudge
  • grudgement
  • grudgery
  • grudgingly
  • misgrudge

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Dugger, Gudger, gurged, rugged


English

Pronunciation

  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /stʃʉː/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /stjuː/, /stʃuː/
  • (US) enPR: sto͞o, IPA(key): /stu/
  • Rhymes: -uː
  • Hyphenation: stew

Etymology 1

From Middle English stewe, stue, from Anglo-Norman estouve, Old French estuve (bath, bathhouse) (modern French étuve), from Medieval Latin stupha, of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Vulgar Latin *extufāre, from ex- + Ancient Greek τῦφος (tûphos, smoke, steam), from τύφω (túphō, to smoke). See also Italian stufare, Portuguese estufar. Compare also Old English stuf-bæþ (a hot-air bath, vapour bath); see stove.

Noun

stew (usually uncountable, plural stews)

  1. (obsolete) A cooking-dish used for boiling; a cauldron. [14th-17thc.]
  2. (now historical) A heated bath-room or steam-room; also, a hot bath. [from 14thc.]
  3. (archaic) A brothel. [from 14thc.]
    • 1681, John Dryden, Absalom and Achitophel
      And rak’d, for converts, even the court and stews.
    • 1835, Thomas Babington Macaulay, Sir James Mackintosh
      Because he was chaste, the precinct of his temple is filled with licensed stews.
    • 1977, Gãmini Salgãdo, The Elizabethan Underworld, Folio Society, 2006, p.37:
      Although whores were permitted to sit at the door of the stew, they could not solicit in any way nor ‘chide or throw stones’ at passers-by.
  4. (obsolete) A prostitute.
    • 1650, Anthony Weldon, The Court and Character of King James I
      But it was so plotted betwixt the Lady, her Husband, and Bristol, that instead of that beauty, he had a notorious Stew sent him, and surely his carriage there was so lascivious…
  5. (uncountable, countable) A dish cooked by stewing. [from 18thc.]
    • 1870, Charles Dickens, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, Wordsworth Classics, 1998, p.367:
      I noticed then that there was nothing to drink on the table but brandy, and nothing to eat but salted herrings, and a hot, sickly, highly peppered stew.
  6. (Sussex) A pool in which fish are kept in preparation for eating; a stew pond.
  7. (US, regional) An artificial bed of oysters.
  8. (slang) A state of agitated excitement, worry, and/or confusion.
Synonyms
  • (food) casserole, (Britain) hotpot
Coordinate terms
  • casserole
  • cassoulet
  • goulash
  • ragout
Derived terms
  • cowboy stew
  • Irish stew
  • in a stew
  • sonofabitch stew / son-of-a-gun stew
  • stewpot
See also
  • stew pond on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • List of stews on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
Translations

Verb

stew (third-person singular simple present stews, present participle stewing, simple past and past participle stewed)

  1. (transitive or intransitive or ergative) To cook (food) by slowly boiling or simmering.
    I’m going to stew some meat for the casserole.
    The meat is stewing nicely.
  2. (transitive) To brew (tea) for too long, so that the flavour becomes too strong.
  3. (intransitive, figuratively) To suffer under uncomfortably hot conditions.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) To be in a state of elevated anxiety or anger.
Synonyms
  • (suffer under hot conditions): bake, boil, sweat, swelter
  • (be in a state of elevated anxiety): brood, fret, sweat, worry
Translations

Etymology 2

Abbreviation of steward or stewardess.

Noun

stew (plural stews)

  1. A steward or stewardess on an airplane or boat.
    • 1975 November 3, Mordecai Richler, “The Perils of Maureen”, New York, volume 8, number 44, page 8 [1]:
      And then, working as a stew for American Airlines, Mo met another older man [] .
    • 1991, Tom Clancy, The Sum of All Fears, 1992 edition, →ISBN, page 480 [2]:
      [] We want to know what he’s going to be saying on his airplane.”
      “I don’t have the legs to dress up as a stew, doc. Besides, I never learned to do the tea ceremony, either.”
    • 1992 January, Skip Hollandsworth, “Doing the Hustle”, Texas Monthly, ISSN 0148-7736, volume 20, issue 1, page 52 [3]:
      Dallas was also becoming known as a “stew zoo” because so many flight attendants were relocating there to work for Southwest, Braniff, and American Airlines.

Anagrams

  • ESWT, Tews, West, ewts, tews, west, wets

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