guard vs tackle what difference

what is difference between guard and tackle

English

Alternative forms

  • gard, garde, guarde (obsolete)

Etymology

For verb: From early Middle French or late Old French (circa 14th cent) guarder (to keep, ward, guard, save, preserve, etc.), from Frankish *wardōn, from Proto-Germanic *wardāną (to guard, protect). Cognate with Old English weardian (whence English to ward). Compare French garder. See also English regard.

For noun: From Middle English garde, from early Middle French or late Old French guarde (a guardian, warden, keeper) (whence modern French garde), from the verb guarder. Doublet of garda, which is from Irish.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɡɑːd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɡɑɹd/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)d

Noun

guard (plural guards)

  1. A person who, or thing that, protects or watches over something.
  2. (Ireland) A garda; a police officer.
    • 2016, Anastasia Dukova, A History of the Dublin Metropolitan Police and its Colonial Legacy, Springer (→ISBN), page 139
      The Garda Regulations 1924 required a candidate for appointment as a guard to be able to produce satisfactory references as to his character
  3. (military) A squad responsible for protecting something.
  4. The part of a sword that protects the wielder’s hand.
  5. A part of a machine which blocks access to dangerous parts.
  6. A watchchain.
  7. (Australia) A panel of a car that encloses the wheel area, especially the front wheels.
  8. (uncountable) A state of caution; posture of defence.
  9. Something worn to protect part of the body, e.g. the shins in cricket.
  10. (basketball) A relatively short player, playing farther from the basket than a forward or center.
  11. (cricket) The position on the popping crease where a batsman makes a mark to align himself with the wicket; see take guard.
  12. (American football) Either of two offensive positions between the center and each of the offensive tackles, whose main responsibilities are to protect the quarterback, and open up “holes” through which offensive players can run.
  13. (sports) A player playing a position named guard.
  14. (rail transport) An employee, normally travelling in the last vehicle of a train, responsible for the safety of the train.
    • 1938, Xavier Herbert, Capricornia, New York: D. Appleton-Century, 1943, Chapter IX, p. 141, [4]
      When an engineer wished to stop a swiftly moving train he had first to whistle to the guard requesting him to apply the hand-brake of the van, and then apply the hand-brake of the engine. Guards did not always hear.
  15. (computing, programming) A Boolean expression that must evaluate to true for a branch of program execution to continue.

Synonyms

  • (the part of a sword that protects the wielder’s hand): quillon
  • (part of machine blocking dangerous parts): protection
  • (panel of a car enclosing a wheel): fender

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

guard (third-person singular simple present guards, present participle guarding, simple past and past participle guarded)

  1. To protect from danger; to secure against surprise, attack, or injury; to keep in safety; to defend.
  2. To keep watch over, in order to prevent escape or restrain from acts of violence, or the like.
    Guard the prisoner.
  3. To watch by way of caution or defense; to be caution; to be in a state or position of defense or safety.
    Careful people guard against mistakes.
  4. To protect the edge of, especially with an ornamental border; hence, to face or ornament with lists, laces, etc.
  5. To fasten by binding; to gird.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)

Derived terms

  • guard one’s tongue

Translations

Further reading

  • guard in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • guard in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • guard at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Dagur, Darug, Dugar, Durga, draug, durag


English

Etymology

From Middle English takel (gear, apparatus), from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German takel (ship’s rigging), perhaps related to Middle Dutch taken (to grasp, seize). Akin to Danish takkel (tackle), Swedish tackel (tackle). More at take.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtækəl/, [ˈtʰækɫ̩]
  • Rhymes: -ækəl

Noun

tackle (countable and uncountable, plural tackles)

  1. A device for grasping an object and an attached means of moving it, as a rope and hook.
  2. A block and tackle.
  3. (nautical, slang, uncountable) Clothing.
  4. (fishing, uncountable) Equipment (rod, reel, line, lure, etc.) used when angling.
  5. (uncountable, informal, by extension) Equipment, gear, gadgetry.
    • 2004 June 24–30, “Jeff Gordon Never Gets Tired Of Seeing Face On Cheap Plastic Crap”, The Onion, available in Embedded in America, →ISBN, page 193,
      … an illuminated license-plate frame bearing his likeness, signature, and yellow number 24. “That there’s a real nice piece of tackle. …”
  6. (sports, countable) A play where a player attempts to take control over the ball from an opponent, as in rugby or football.
  7. (rugby, American football, countable) A play where a defender brings the ball carrier to the ground.
  8. (countable) Any instance in which one person intercepts another and forces them to the ground.
  9. (American football) An offensive line position between a guard and an end: offensive tackle; a person playing that position.
  10. (American football) A defensive position between two defensive ends: defensive tackle; a person playing that position.
  11. (slang) A man’s genitalia.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

tackle (third-person singular simple present tackles, present participle tackling, simple past and past participle tackled)

  1. To force a person to the ground with the weight of one’s own body, usually by jumping on top or slamming one’s weight into him or her.
  2. To face or deal with, attempting to overcome or fight down.
  3. (sports) To attempt to take away a ball.
  4. (rugby, American football) To bring a ball carrier to the ground.
  5. (Singapore, colloquial) To “hit on” or pursue a person that one is interested in.

Translations

References

  • tackle in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • tackle at OneLook Dictionary Search

French

Pronunciation

  • Homophones: tacklent, tackles, tacle, tacles

Verb

tackle

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tackler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of tackler
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of tackler
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of tackler
  5. second-person singular imperative of tackler

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English tackle.

Noun

tackle m (plural tackles)

  1. (sports) tackle

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