guerrilla vs insurgent what difference

what is difference between guerrilla and insurgent

English

Alternative forms

  • guerilla

Etymology

From Spanish guerrilla, diminutive of guerra (war), coined during the Peninsular War.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɡəˈɹɪlə/
  • Homophone: gorilla

Noun

guerrilla (plural guerrillas)

  1. A soldier in a small independent group, fighting against the government or regular forces by surprise raids.
  2. (now rare) A non-official war carried out by small independent groups; a guerrilla war.

Translations

Adjective

guerrilla (comparative more guerrilla, superlative most guerrilla)

  1. (military) Relating to, using, or typical of guerrilla warfare, or its principles of small independent or non-official perpetrators.
    • 1908, George Devereux Oswell, Sketches of Rulers of India, volume I, Chapter VII, page 127:
      Wherever Nicholson was most wanted, there he was sure to be found. What his life was at this time may be seen from a letter he wrote to his mother: ‘I am leading a very guerrilla sort of life with seven hundred horse and foot raised among the people of the country. The chieftain who is in rebellion has eight regular regiments and sixteen guns, so that I am unable to meet them openly in the field.’
    • 1963, Samuel B. Griffith (translator), Mao Zedong, The Red Book of Guerrilla Warfare, edited by Shawn Conners, →ISBN, published 2010, page 14, original 1937
      On the other hand, after the fall of Feng Ling Tu, the operations of Central Shansi, and Suiyuan, troops were more guerrilla than orthodox in nature.
    • 1976, Walter Laqueur, Guerrilla Warfare, page 205:
      The Slovak uprising in the latter days was not guerrilla in character, which, incidentally, may have been one of the reasons for its failure.
  2. (marketing) Relating to, using, or typical of guerrilla marketing.
    • 1989, Michael Wiese, Film & video marketing, page 445:
      We took a very guerrilla approach to marketing Goin’ Hollywood, in keeping with the irreverent tone of the game.
  3. Using unconventional, non-traditional, non-mainstream and often subversive practices to achieve something.

See also

  • guerrillero
  • guerrilla warfare
  • partisan

Catalan

Etymology

From Spanish guerrilla.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ɡəˈri.ʎə/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ɡeˈri.ʎa/

Noun

guerrilla f (plural guerrilles)

  1. guerrilla (small official or unofficial military troop)
  2. guerrilla war

Derived terms

  • guerriller

Further reading

  • “guerrilla” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “guerrilla” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “guerrilla” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “guerrilla” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Spanish guerrilla.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡəˈril.jaː/, /ˌɡeːˈril.jaː/
  • Hyphenation: guer‧ril‧la

Noun

guerrilla f (plural guerrilla’s)

  1. A guerrilla war; guerrilla warfare. [from 1810s]
    Synonym: guerrillaoorlog
  2. A guerrilla fighter.
    Synonyms: guerrillastrijder, guerrillero

Derived terms

  • guerrillabasis
  • guerilla-eenheid
  • guerrillagroepering
  • guerrillaleger
  • guerrillaoorlog
  • guerrillastrijder

Descendants

  • Indonesian: gerilya

Spanish

Etymology

guerra (war) +‎ -illa (diminutive suffix)

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: gue‧rri‧lla
  • Noun

    guerrilla f (plural guerrillas)

    1. guerrilla (small official or unofficial military troop)
    2. guerrilla war

    Derived terms

    • guerrillear
    • guerrillero

    Descendants

    • Catalan: guerrilla
    • English: guerrilla, guerilla
    • French: guérilla
      • Turkish: gerilla
    • Italian: guerriglia
    • Piedmontese: guerija
    • Portuguese: guerrilha

    Further reading

    • “guerrilla” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


    English

    Etymology

    From Latin īnsurgentem, accusative singular of īnsurgēns, present active participle of īnsurgō (I rise up against, revolt), from in (against) + surgō (I rise), itself from sub (up from below) + regō (I guide, direct, rule, govern, administer), from Proto-Indo-European *reg- (to move in a straight line, to rule, guide, lead straight, put right).

    Pronunciation

    • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪnˈsəːdʒ(ə)nt/
    • (US) IPA(key): /ɪnˈsəɹdʒənt/

    Adjective

    insurgent (not comparable)

    1. Rebellious, opposing authority.
      • 1856, John Lothrop Motley, The Rise of the Dutch Republic
        The insurgent provinces.
    2. Of water: surging or rushing in.
      • 1791, Erasmus Darwin, The Economy of Vegetation, J. Johnson, p. 33:
        Vesuvio groans through all his echoing caves, / And Etna thunders o’er the insurgent waves.

    Translations

    Noun

    insurgent (plural insurgents)

    1. One of several people who take up arms against the local state authority; a participant in insurgency.

    Translations

    Anagrams

    • retunings, unresting

    Catalan

    Etymology

    From Latin īnsurgentem.

    Pronunciation

    • Rhymes: -ent

    Noun

    insurgent m (plural insurgents)

    1. insurgent

    Related terms

    • insurgència

    Adjective

    insurgent (masculine and feminine plural insurgents)

    1. insurgent

    Further reading

    • “insurgent” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
    • “insurgent” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
    • “insurgent” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
    • “insurgent” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

    French

    Verb

    insurgent

    1. third-person plural present indicative of insurger
    2. third-person plural present subjunctive of insurger

    Latin

    Verb

    īnsurgent

    1. third-person plural future active indicative of īnsurgō

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