guess vs supposition what difference

what is difference between guess and supposition

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: gĕs, IPA(key): /ɡɛs/
  • Rhymes: -ɛs

Etymology 1

From Middle English gessen, probably of North Germanic origin, from Old Danish getse, gitse, getsa (to guess), from Old Norse *getsa, *gitsa, from Proto-Germanic *gitisōną (to guess), from Proto-Germanic *getaną (to get), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰed- (to take, seize). Cognate with Danish gisse (to guess), Norwegian gissa, gjette (to guess), Swedish gissa (to guess), Saterland Frisian gisje (to guess), Dutch gissen (to guess), Low German gissen (to guess). Related also to Icelandic giska (“to guess”; from Proto-Germanic *gitiskōną). Compare also Russian гада́ть (gadátʹ, to conjecture, guess, divine), Albanian gjëzë (riddle) from gjej (find, recover, obtain). More at get.

Verb

guess (third-person singular simple present guesses, present participle guessing, simple past and past participle guessed)

  1. To reach a partly (or totally) unqualified conclusion.
  2. To solve by a correct conjecture; to conjecture rightly.
  3. (chiefly US) to suppose (introducing a proposition of uncertain plausibility).
    • 1714, Alexander Pope, Imitations of Horace
      But in known images of life I guess / The labour greater.
  4. (colloquial) To think, conclude, or decide (without a connotation of uncertainty). Usually in first person: “I guess”.
  5. (obsolete) To hit upon or reproduce by memory.
Synonyms
  • hypothesize
  • take a stab
  • speculate
  • assume
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English gesse. Cognate with Dutch gis (a guess).

Noun

guess (plural guesses)

  1. A prediction about the outcome of something, typically made without factual evidence or support.
    Synonyms: estimate, hypothesis, prediction
Derived terms
Translations

Further reading

  • guess in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • guess in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Guses


English

Etymology

From Middle English supposicioun, from Anglo-Norman supposicion, from Latin suppositiō, suppositiōnem (supposition), from sub- (under) + positiō, positiōnem (position; theme), from positus (position), from the perfect passive participle of pōnō, pōnere (put, place).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌsʌpəˈzɪʃən/

Noun

supposition (countable and uncountable, plural suppositions)

  1. Something that is supposed; an assumption made to account for known facts, conjecture.
  2. The act or an instance of supposing.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:supposition

Related terms

  • suppositious

Translations


French

Etymology

From supposer +‎ -ition.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sy.po.zi.sjɔ̃/

Noun

supposition f (plural suppositions)

  1. supposition

Related terms

  • présupposition

Further reading

  • “supposition” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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