guest vs node what difference

what is difference between guest and node

English

Etymology

From Middle English gest, from Old Norse gestr, which replaced or was merged with Old English ġiest, both from Proto-Germanic *gastiz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰóstis (stranger, guest, host, someone with whom one has reciprocal duties of hospitality). Cognate with German Gast (guest). Doublet of host, from Latin.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: gĕst, IPA(key): /ɡɛst/
  • Rhymes: -ɛst
  • Homophone: guessed

Noun

guest (plural guests)

  1. A recipient of hospitality, especially someone staying by invitation at the house of another.
  2. A patron or customer in a hotel etc.
  3. An invited visitor or performer to an institution or to a broadcast.
  4. (computing) A user given temporary access to a system despite not having an account of their own.
  5. (zoology) Any insect that lives in the nest of another without compulsion and usually not as a parasite.
  6. (zoology) An inquiline.

Translations

Verb

guest (third-person singular simple present guests, present participle guesting, simple past and past participle guested)

  1. (intransitive) to appear as a guest, especially on a broadcast
  2. (intransitive) as a musician, to play as a guest, providing an instrument that a band/orchestra does not normally have in its line up (for instance, percussion in a string band)
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To receive or entertain hospitably.
    • 1608, Josuah Sylvester, Du Bartas his divine weekes and workes
      Two Angels sent Two Heav’nly Scowts the Lord to Sodom sent ; downe , received and guested

Translations

Derived terms

Anagrams

  • tegus


English

Etymology

From Middle English node, borrowed from Latin nōdus. Doublet of knot and nodus.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -əʊd

Noun

node (plural nodes)

  1. A knot, knob, protuberance or swelling.
  2. (astronomy) The point where the orbit of a planet, as viewed from the Sun, intersects the ecliptic. The ascending and descending nodes refer respectively to the points where the planet moves from South to North and N to S; their respective symbols are ☊ and ☋.
  3. (botany) A leaf node.
  4. (networking) A computer or other device attached to a network.
  5. (engineering) The point at which the lines of a funicular machine meet from different angular directions; — called also knot.
  6. (geometry) The point at which a curve crosses itself, being a double point of the curve. See crunode and acnode.
  7. (geometry) A similar point on a surface, where there is more than one tangent-plane.
  8. (graph theory) A vertex or a leaf in a graph of a network, or other element in a data structure.
  9. (medicine) A hard concretion or incrustation which forms upon bones attacked with rheumatism, gout, or syphilis; sometimes also, a swelling in the neighborhood of a joint.
  10. (physics) A point along a standing wave where the wave has minimal amplitude.
  11. (rare) The knot, intrigue, or plot of a dramatic work.
  12. (technical) A hole in the gnomon of a sundial, through which passes the ray of light which marks the hour of the day, the parallels of the Sun’s declination, his place in the ecliptic, etc.
  13. (computational linguistics) The word of interest in a KWIC, surrounded by left and right cotexts.

Synonyms

  • (computer networking): host
  • (graph theory): vertex

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Irish: nód

Translations

See also

  • neurode

References

  • node on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Deno, Deon, Done, Endo, done, endo, endo-, oden, onde, oned

Danish

Noun

node c (singular definite noden, plural indefinite noder)

  1. (music) note

Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

node

  1. (archaic) Dative singular form of nood

Japanese

Romanization

node

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ので

Latin

Noun

nōde

  1. vocative singular of nōdus

Middle English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin nōdus. Doublet of knotte.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈnɔːd(ə)/

Noun

node (plural nodez)

  1. (medicine, Late Middle English) lump, swelling
  2. (rare, Late Middle English) knot, tie

Descendants

  • English: node
    • Irish: nód

References

  • “nōde, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-23.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Latin nodus (knot). Akin to English node.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²nuː.də/ (example of pronunciation)

Noun

node m (definite singular noden, indefinite plural nodar, definite plural nodane)

  1. a node

Etymology 2

From Old Norse hnoða.

Alternative forms

  • noda

Noun

node n (definite singular nodet, indefinite plural node, definite plural noda)

  1. Synonym of nyste

Etymology 3

Verb

node (present tense noder, past tense nodde, past participle nodd/nodt, passive infinitive nodast, present participle nodande, imperative nod)

  1. Synonym of neia

References

  • “node” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

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